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Marine, Fisheries & Aquaculture

Public feedback was sought on Proposed Modernization of the Pulp and Paper Effluent Regulations until November 17, 2017. Information sessions were held via webinars to present the consultation document, answer questions and hear feedback. The document is available down below.

Fisheries Act:

On February 6, 2018, Fisheries and Oceans presented proposed amendements to the Fisheries Act. These amendements include restored protections for fish habitat, enhanced marine protection and habitat restoration, better management of projects, preserving independent inshore fisheries and a strengthened Indigenous role in project reviews, monitoring and policy development. Click here for more information.

On June 20, 2016, the Government of Canada launched a review of environmental and regulatory processes, including restoring lost protections and introducing modern safeguards to the Fisheries Act and the Navigation Protection Act.

In the Fall of 2016, the public’s feedback was sought on the 2012–2013 amendments to the Fisheries Act. The summary of the comments is below.

Navigation Protection Act:

The Standing Committee on Transport, Infrastructure, and Communities agreed to devote approximately eight (8) meetings to conduct the study and report on the changes to the Navigation Protection Act that came into force in 2014, with a specific focus on:
  • The environmental and sector impacts of the changes;
  • The impact of the changes on the long-term viability of commercial and recreational utilization of Canada’s waterways;
  • The cost, practicality and effectiveness of the changes when gauged against the environmental, business and recreational function of Canada’s waterways; and
  • The efficiency of the changes when viewed holistically, from a user perspective, with other Acts that collectively impact upon users.
The Committee asked for written briefs from the public in the Fall of 2016.  For more information, click here.
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