• At the height of the harvest season and just in time for Thanksgiving, the Conservation Council of New Brunswick is releasing its new, free BuyLocalNB™ smartphone app!

    Our user-friendly app helps you find delicious and wholesome locally-grown meats and alternatives, fruits, vegetables, grain products and more — all grown or produced right here in New Brunswick! 

    Looking to prepare a local-infused Thanksgiving feast with all the fixings this year? Use the BuyLocalNB™ to source your ingredients within minutes.

    But it’s not just for local food! Looking for furniture with that authentic, hand-carved feel? Or are you on the look-out for a thoughtful gift idea, like the perfect hand-made artisanal craft? Maybe you want environmentally-friendly cleaning supplies or soaps? The BuyLocalNB™ directory has it all, and our new smartphone app puts everything right at your fingertips.

    We also want to help you experience the local food economy through our smartphone app. Use the ‘Visit a Farm’ feature to find a local producer near you — maybe a sugar shack, apple orchard or dairy farm — and arrange a first-hand look at what they do to provide our families with fresh, wholesome, local products. You’ll also find the dozens of farmers markets and local markets adding life and vibrancy to our communities.

    buylocal_ccnbbanner
    The BuyLocalNB™ initiative launched at the Conservation Council in 2009. In 2011, we developed an online local food directory that became and instant favourite of local foodies, with chefs and retailers using our directory to source their products and ingredients.

    We revamped our online food directory last fall, adding a user-friendly searchable database of local growers, producers and retailers.

    Today, the online directory and complementary smarthphone app feature more than 280 local farmers, craftspeople and businesses, with more becoming listed each day!

    The BuyLocalNB™ app is currently available as an Android download. It will be available in iOS soon. (Are you an iOS user who is anxious to try out our new app? Check out the directory at buylocalnb.ca for a preview of what the app can do!)

     Download App

    Why should you shop local with our new BuyLocalNB™ app?  Easy! Supporting local food: 
    •   Supports the provincial economy and the family farm;
    •   Keeps N.B. money in N.B. communities by circulating our food dollars locally;
    •   Protects the environment by decreasing greenhouse gas emissions from transportation;
    •   Strengthens our communities by letting New Brunswickers get to know their local farmers and learn about where their food comes from; and
    •   Proactively increases our public health by providing better access to healthy nutritious food
    Get the new BuyLocalNB™ smarthphone app to download local food to your table today!
  • Tuesday, 20 June, 2017

    Conservation Council reacts to Auditor General’s report on climate action in N.B.

    The Auditor General of New Brunswick, Kim MacPherson, has delivered a substantive review of the province’s climate change plan and what is needed to turn policy intentions into on-the-ground work to protect homes and communities from what she says “may be one of the greatest challenges for communities, governments and corporations in the coming decades.”

    “New Brunswick’s Auditor General’s report should put wind in the sails of the government’s plans to reduce carbon pollution and make our communities healthy and strong in the face of climate change,” says Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

    “She points out, and rightly so, that while the 2016 Climate Change Action Plan lays out a series of 118 actions, we lack an aggressive time table or details on implementation.

    She recommends that the government introduce legislation to set its pollution targets into law, similar to that found in British Columbia, Quebec, Ontario, and Nova Scotia.

    We couldn't agree more and might go even a bit further — let’s see the legislation introduced the next time the Legislative Assembly meets, and let’s hope all parties vote for its speedy adoption.

    “If we want to catch this boat, the time for the government and NB Power to move is now. Not in 2018. Not ten years from now," says Corbett.
     -30-

    The Conservation Council of New Brunswick
    Established in 1969, the Conservation Council of New Brunswick has remained the province’s leading public advocate for environmental protection. A member of the UN’s Global 500 Roll of Honour, we work to find practical solutions to help families and citizens, educators, governments and businesses protect the air we breathe, the water we drink, the precious marine ecosystem and the land, including the forest, that support us.

    Recommended links

    To arrange an interview, contact:
    Jon MacNeill, Communications Director | 458-8747 | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

  • For countless generations, people in New Brunswick have cherished the wildlife and beauty of their natural surroundings. We have adopted many deeply rooted outdoor traditions that take us to the rivers, lakes, wetlands, forests, and coastlines of our beautiful province in all seasons of the year. Help protect the wild places that you love so that your family, children, and grandchildren will be able to enjoy them forever.

    Over 95% of New Brunswick is currently unprotected and open to exploitation that could harm wildlife and damage the natural beauty of our province, and we need to act now to change that.
  • Conservons notre N
    Pendant des générations, les Néo-Brunswickois ont établi des traditions profondément ancrées et des communautés fortes qui prospèrent parmi les rivières, les forêts, les lacs et créatures vivantes qui composent notre belle province. Aidez à protéger les milieux naturels et sauvages que vous aimez afin que votre famille, vos enfants et vos petits-enfants puissent en profiter pour toujours.

    Plus de 95 % du Nouveau-Brunswick n'est actuellement pas protégé et nous devons agir maintenant pour changer cela.

    Le Canada s’est engagé à conserver 17 % des terres et des eaux douces d'ici 2020 lors de l’Union internationale. En tant que canadiens, nous avons la responsabilité partagée de tenir le gouvernement responsable de l'atteinte de cet objectif.
  •  

    La décennie des Nations Unies pour l’éducation en vue du développement durable (ÉDD) se terminera l’année prochaine. Qu’avons-nous accompli au Canada pour soutenir cette décennie? Quels défis avons-nous affrontés? Et vers quoi dirigeons-nous? Ce sont les questions qui ont encadré les discussions de l’atelier national sur l’ÉDD à laquelle j’ai participé récemment à la réunion annuelle de la commission canadienne de l’UNESCO. En général, l’atelier a permis des discussions intéressantes bien qu’à mon avis ce fut un peu trop d’écoutes de nos propres propos et pas assez d’actions concrètes.

    Peut-être parmi les commentaires des plus aptes à susciter la réflexion que j’ai entendue concernaient les meilleures définitions de l’ÉDD, souvent appelée éducation à la viabilité ici au NB. La voici : l’ÉDD consiste à trouver le type d’avenir que nous souhaitons et puis à préparer les gens avec les compétences, les connaissances et les valeurs dont ils auront besoin pour faire de ce futur une réalité.

    L’atelier m’a aidé à réfléchir aux diverses initiatives en ÉDD au Nouveau-Brunswick par rapport aux priorités internationales et celles des autres provinces. L’UNESCO a préparé trois priorités pour ÉDD internationale; celles-ci ont été adoptées au Manitoba. Devrions-nous au Nouveau-Brunswick nous concentrer aussi sur ces mêmes priorités? Ces priorités sont les suivantes :

    • Dans toutes les écoles un plan en ÉDD ou sur la viabilité d’ici 2015;
    • Les facultés d’éducation incorporent l’ÉDD dans leurs programmes d’éducations des enseignants; et
    • La formation professionnelle (p. e. dans les collèges communautaires) réoriente sa programmation pour nous aider à transformer notre « économie brune » en « économie verte ».

    Des recherches entreprises dans plusieurs pays pourraient aider notre cause dans la province. Nous, « les convaincus » savons que l’ÉDD améliore la qualité de l’éducation. Toutefois, des recherches sont nécessaires pour convaincre les « non-croyants ». Ces recherchent sont entreprises par un certain nombre de pays qui travaillent en collaboration pour explorer les liens entre l’ÉDD et la qualité de l’éducation et pour trouver des données qualitatives et quantitatives pour démontrer cette relations.

    Vingt-neuf représentants d’organisations canadiennes ont participé à cet atelier. Le rapport officiel se trouve ici.

  • Come see why this property is so important.

    http://forestsinternational.org/projects/conservation-of-working-lands/

     

    Since early 2009, CFI has been working with organic farmers and sustainable woodlot owners Clark Philips and Susan Tyler, as well as the New Brunswick Community Land Trust (NBCLT), in order to develop a succession plan for a unique 650 acre farm and Acadian Forest woodlot called Whaelghinbran Farm. Clark (74) and Susan (72), have been farming organically and practicing ecological forestry on their woodlot for over 40 years. By carefully harvesting and marketing timber they have begun a process of restoration, working to achieve the health and diversity found within the Acadian Forest Eco-region prior to European settlement. In order to continue this legacy, Clark, Susan, CFI and the NBCLT are working to uphold the principles and techniques employed at Whaelghinbran Farm through a working lands conservation agreement. CFI intends to steward the farm and woodlot under the conservation easement with a community of interested organizations and individuals, and is striving to establish a rural training centre on site.This training centre will provide students from the region with the knowledge, skills, and network necessary to become involved in a movement rooted in ecologically-based working lands in the Acadian Forest Eco-region. The multi-stakeholder community-based ecological forestry practiced at Whaelghinbran will also provide a strong example of alternative approaches to woodland management in the region.

  • Falls Brook Centre as you know is a registered charity and demonstration centre, committed to finding and promoting practical solutions to today's sustainability challenges. We are dedicated to the goals of inspiring people to work together using environmentally sound practices to create thriving local communities. What does this look like? Highlighting local economies, renewable energy options, and economically and ecologically sound land management techniques that work on the quarter-acre to 5,000 acre scales. On the ground, this is all about education aimed at all ages and addresses. If this sounds like something you could be a part of, I encourage you to visit our website and social media pages and consider becoming a Board member to make a real difference in the lives of New Brunswickers.

    http://fallsbrookcentre.ca/wp/get-involved/volunteer-opportunities/

  • Join us for our annual local food celebration at the Conservation Council Southeast Chapter’s 100-Mile Dinner Fundraiser.

    This popular event takes place on Sunday, Oct. 14 from 5-8 p.m. at Dolma Food, 251 St. George St. (second floor) in Moncton.

    Tickets are $25 in advance or $30 at the door. You can buy tickets online here, at the Dolma Food stores in Moncton and Dieppe, or by contacting Anita atccnbsoutheast@gmail.com or 506-859-8104. The 100-Mile Dinner gathers friends, neighbours and community members to celebrate with a locally-sourced tapas buffet (including vegetarian options), guest speakers, a live auction, draw prizes, and presentation of the third annual Beth McLaughlin Environmental Journalism Award. If you have items you’d like to donate to the auction, please contact Anita atccnbsoutheast@gmail.com or Dave at 506-859-8104. Seating is limited so get your tickets today!
  • NB Groups Want The Provincial Government To Heed Their Message
    For Immediate Release
    September 16, 2011

    Moncton -- On Saturday, September 17, the anti-shale gas network of citizens have planned
    another march for New Brunswickers to say “NO!” to shale gas in the downtown core of
    Moncton.

    More than 2 dozen groups from around the province, from places like Cornhill, Sackville,
    Taymouth and Hampton, recently announced the network they’ve formed to stop shale gas
    development in New Brunswick, and their next step is to hold another rally to continue sending
    their message to the provincial government that the shale gas industry is not welcome here.

    This grassroots movement has committed itself to informing their fellow New Brunswickers of
    the dangers of shale gas. “It’s shameful that our government has not honestly engaged and
    informed its citizens of the dangers of this industry,” says Debra Hopper, a spokesperson for Our
    Environment, Our Choice, Notre Environnement, Notre Choix. “We have an intelligent group
    here. We have done our homework; now the government needs to do the same. It has been
    reading off of cheat sheets provided by industry. The same tired lines that we’re all sick of
    hearing. The people of New Brunswick have a right to know what we are really facing.”

    “We ask that our government do its job in protecting our life sustaining resources against an
    industry that is advancing at an accelerated rate and that threatens our quality of life for
    generations to come. Once the damages are done, there is no return,” says Patricia Léger,
    spokesperson for Memramcook Action. “We cannot expect industry to warn us of the dangers of
    this toxic method of extracting natural gas and our government seems to only be listening to
    industry.”

    In our ongoing effort to get the facts about the dangers of shale gas drilling out into the open, a
    second march is being held this time in Moncton.  It will begin at 12:00 noon at the Hal Betts
    Ball Fields – Moncton SportPlex, located at 250 Assomption Blvd at the corner of Vaughn
    Harvey. Protesters will march along Vaughn Harvey Blvd, and down Main Street before
    congregating at Moncton City Hall, next to SWN Offices.  We invite all water drinkers and air
    breathers to join us in our PEACEFUL display of democracy in action. 

    At City Hall, there will be speakers from various groups and communities from across the
    province, including the Youth Environmental Action Network, Elsipogtog First Nation, Friends
    of Mount Carleton, the Maliseet Grand Council, and Ban Fracking NB. 

    Media Contacts:
    Our Environment, Our Choice, Notre Envrionnement, Notre Choix, Denise Melanson: 523-9467
    Quality of Life Initiative, Otty Forgrave: 839-2326
    CCNB Action, Stephanie Merrill: 261-8317
    Ban Fracking NB, Terri Telasco: 866-7658
    New Brunswickers Against Fracking, Mary de La Valette: 369-1995
    Council of Canadians, St. John Chapter, Carol Ring: 847-0953
    Grand Lake Watershed Guardians, Amy Sullivan: 339-1980 or 339-5324
    Sierra Club Atlantic, Hazel Richardson: 452-8915

  • Do you know an individual or organization that has demonstrated excellence in land conservation in our province? Nominations for the 2018 Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation are open until Monday, October 1, 2018.

    Successful nominees will have a significant impact on land conservation in New Brunswick through leadership, direct action, and long-term involvement as well as other significant contributions. Eligible nominees may include any individuals or organizations involved in stewardship, volunteerism, donation of lands, or building effective partnerships and must meet at least one of the following criteria:
    • An individual or entity who has contributed in a sustained manner over a significant period of time;
    • An individual or entity who has contributed significantly in a relatively short amount of time;
    • A donor of funds or property;
    • A volunteer, steward and/or member of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick;
    • A corporate or community partner of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick;
    • An individual who contributed significantly in the past and should be recognized posthumously.

    Click here to download the nomination form!

     

    For more information, visit: www.naturetrust.nb.ca/wp/blog/2018-lg-award-nominations or contact Danielle Andrus, Communications Manager, at danielle.andrus@ntnb.org or (506) 457-2398.

    2018 LG
     
  • NBCC Woodstock will be the site of the 2nd Richard Olmstead Sustainable Living Expo (ROSLE) on Saturday, October 13, 2012, 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM.The Expo will feature speakers, workshops, displays and booths to showcase goods and services that relate to living locally in a sustainable lifestyle. (See Attached)

    The Expo is an opportunity for those who produce or provide goods and services that make the Woodstock Region more self-reliant and energy efficient to share their resources, knowledge, and expertise with the wider community. Exhibitors include individuals, businesses, and organizations that provide goods and services, including arts, recreational, and educational services, in the greater Woodstock region.

    From crafts people to passive solar homebuilding, from local food to energy efficiency experts, from healthy eating to products for sustainable living, the Expo showcases the many ways businesses and community organizations are working to build a stronger, more resilient region.

    Dr.Wayne Groszko (Ph.D.in Chemical Oceanography, Dalhousie University) is the Key note speaker. His topic is"Solar Energy: AWorldTour – Learn about exciting new developments in solar energy around the world, with connections to how you can use solarenergy here at home in New Brunswick."

    Speakers and work shops include:

    10:00 am  Dr. Donald Wood - Geothermalenergy

    11:00 am  Peter Steeves - Heatpumpsoptions

    12:00 pm  SimplyforLife-..Cookingdemonstration

    1:00 pm    Dr.Wayne Groszko - Keynote address

    2:00 pm    Sara Mudg - Efficiency New Brunswick Opportunities

    3:00 pm    Garth Hood – Passive solar Houses Web: thoughtfuldwellings.ca

    Breakfast with healthy local foods is being provided by Simply for Life for $7

    from8:00 to 9:30 am

    The local sponsor the Sustainable Energy Group will release its free new booklet at the Expo called ‘From Oil Dependency to Renewable Energy – An Energy Transition Guidebook, Assessment, Planning, and Resources’.

    The guide book demonstrates many practical ways how people can reduce their own environmental footprint while living healthier lives, with numerous examples of local

    people already doing this.

    Richard Olmstead (1954 - 2010), one of the founding members of SEG in 2004, was passionate about educating people to consume less and to be mindful of our impact on the environment. The Expo was Richard's idea, and is in his memory.

    Falls Brook Centre – Activities for all ages. Admission to the Expo is only $2, children under 12 free.

    (Submitted on behalf of the Sustainable Energy Group)

  • PRESS RELEASE

    For Immediate Release        November 17, 2011

    Shale Gas Protest March and Rallies in Fredericton November 19th and 23rd

     

    FREDERICTON NB ---- A march and two rallies at the Provincial Legislature will take place on November 19th and November 23rd to protest unconventional shale gas development in New Brunswick.
    Citizens and community groups from throughout New Brunswick will converge on Fredericton on Saturday, November 19th and at the opening session of the New Brunswick Legislature on Wednesday, November 23rd with their message to the Alward Government that the exploration and extraction of natural gas from shale using horizontal drilling in combination with slick water hydraulic fracturing will not be tolerated.

    New Brunswickers from all over the province denounce the development of an unconventional shale gas industry. The process used to extract unconventional shale gas is less than 20 years old. It is the undisputed cause of ecological damage and long-term economic net debt, earthquakes, air and noise pollution, infrastructure degradation and the profligate use and irreversible poisoning of trillions of litres of fresh water. It leaves deleterious impacts on the lives and health of humans and other animals in its wake.

    “The civic duty of New Brunswick residents does not require that they be guinea pigs in anyone's science experiments”, states Jim Emberger, spokesperson for the Taymouth Community Association.

    The promise of large-scale job creation appears over-exaggerated. In a recent presentation at the University of New Brunswick on October 22, 2011, Mr. Calvin Tillman, former mayor of Dish, Texas mentioned that since this industry requires highly skilled workers, most will be imported from outside the province to enable the industry to be more competitive at a time when stock market prices for natural gas are low.

    Events on Saturday, November 19th will begin at 7:00 am with a Sunrise Ceremony at the Old Burial Grounds at 51 Woodstock Road. At 10:00 am there will be a benefit concert at the Old Burial Grounds for the people of Penobsquis. A march to the Provincial Legislature will begin after the concert, starting at 11:00 am.

    Sixty residents in Penobsquis have lost their well water and have experienced ground subsidence allegedly from the industrialization of their rural community. Some who want to move away have been unable to sell their homes. We ask, where is justice for the people of Penobsquis? Will regulations serve anyone when more things go wrong? A point made clear in the recent documentary by Rob Turgeon, ‘Be... Without Water’. (www.youtube.com/user/robfturgeon#p/a/u/1/aK0NMTMXHSw)

    Events on Wednesday, November 23rd are scheduled to begin at the Provincial Legislature at 12:00 noon. A program with music and speakers will begin at 1:00 pm.

     

    Media Contacts:

    Jean Louis Deveau 506 442 1413 jlpdev@nbnet.nb.ca     

    Julia Linke 506 367 0987 linkejul@gmail.com

    Terry Wishart 506 238 4001 t.wishart@banfrackingnb.ca

    _________________________________________________

    COMMUNIQUÉ

    Pour publication immédiate                              17 novembre 2011

    Marche et rassemblements contre les gaz de schiste à Fredericton les 19 et 23 novembre

    FREDERICTON NB — Une marche et deux rassemblements devant l’Assemblée législative auront lieu les 19 et 23 novembre pour protester contre l’exploitation non traditionnelle des gaz de schiste au Nouveau-Brunswick.

    Des citoyens et des groupes communautaires de toutes les régions du Nouveau-Brunswick se réuniront à Fredericton le samedi 19 novembre et lors de la séance d’ouverture de l’Assemblée législative du Nouveau-Brunswick le mercredi 23 novembre pour livrer leur message à l’administration Alward que l’exploration et l’exploitation du gaz naturel des schistes en utilisant le forage horizontal avec des fluides de fracturation ne seront pas tolérées. Les Néobrunswickois de toute la province dénoncent l’exploitation non conventionnelle des gaz de schiste par l’industrie. Le processus utilisé pour extraire les gaz a moins de 20 ans. Et il est la cause non contestée de dégâts écologiques, de dettes économiques nettes à long terme, de tremblements de terre, de pollution atmosphérique et sonore, de dégradation des infrastructures et de l’utilisation immodérée d’eau et de l’empoisonnement irréversible de trillions de litres d’eau douce. Par ailleurs, cette industrie laisse dans son sillage des impacts nuisibles sur la vie et la santé des humains et des autres animaux.

    « Le devoir civique des résidents du Nouveau-Brunswick n’exige pas qu’ils servent de cobaye pour les expériences scientifiques, » affirme Jim Emberger, porte-parole de l’Association communautaire de Taymouth.

    Les promesses de créations d’emplois à grande échelle semblent très exagérées. Dans sa récente présentation à l’université du Nouveau-Brunswick le 22 octobre dernier, monsieur Calvin Tillman, ancien maire de Dish au Texas a mentionné qu’étant donné que cette industrie a besoin de travailleurs hautement qualifiés, la plupart d’entre eux proviendront de l’extérieur de la province afin de permettre aux opérations d’être plus compétitives au moment où les prix sur le marché du gaz naturel sont bas.

    Les évènements de samedi 19 novembre vont commencer à 7 heures avec une cérémonie du lever du soleil au vieux cimetière situé au 51 Woodstock Road. À 10 heures, il y aura un concert au bénéfice des citoyens de Penobsquis. La marche vers l’Assemblée législative commencera après le concert à 11 heures au même endroit.

    En effet, soixante résidents de Penobsquis ont perdu l’eau de leur puits et ont subi des affaissements de terrain après l’industrialisation de leur collectivité rurale. Certains qui ont voulu déménager ailleurs n’ont pas été capables de vendre leur maison. Nous demandons, où se trouve la justice pour les habitants de Penobsquis? Est-ce que des règlementations vont servir à qui que ce soit lorsque d’autres choses tourneront mal? Un récent documentaire par Rob Turgeon donne une réponse très claire :

    « Vivez...sans eau » (www.youtube.com/user/robfturgeon#p/a/u/1/aK0NMTMXHSw)

    Les évènements de mercredi 23 novembre débuteront à l’Assemblée législative à midi. Un
    ensemble d’évènements avec musique et conférenciers débutera à 13 heures.

     

    Personnes-ressources pour les médias :

    Jean Louis Deveau 506 442 1413 jlpdev@nbnet.nb.ca

    Julia Linke 506 367 0987 linkejul@gmail.com

    Terry Wishart 506 238 4001 t.wishart@banfrackingnb.ca

  • PRESS RELEASE: For Immediate Release November 22, 2011

    Shale Gas Protest Rally in Fredericton November 23rd

    FREDERICTON NB ---- A rally at the Provincial Legislature will take place on November 23rd to protest unconventional shale gas development in New Brunswick.

    Citizens and community groups from throughout New Brunswick will converge on Fredericton on Wednesday, November 23rd at the opening session of the New Brunswick Legislature with their message to the Alward Government that the exploration and extraction of natural gas from shale using horizontal drilling in combination with slick water hydraulic fracturing will not be tolerated.

    Members of CUPE locals from throughout the province will be joining industry opponents in solidarity on Wednesday. At their November 3rd 2011 National Convention, CUPE adopted Resolution No.96, which expressly states that all levels of government must put an end to shale gas development because the industry, “has failed to demonstrate that such development would not have serious consequences for the environment and the health of citizens”; and governments being “clearly unprepared for this issue, and have done a poor job of responding to public concerns”.

    New Brunswickers from all over the province denounce the development of an unconventional shale gas industry. The process used to extract unconventional shale gas is less than 20 years old. It is the undisputed cause of ecological damage and long-term economic net debt, earthquakes, air and noise pollution, infrastructure degradation and the profligate use and irreversible poisoning of trillions of litres of fresh water. It leaves deleterious impacts on the lives and health of humans and other animals in its wake.

    “The civic duty of New Brunswick residents does not require that they be guinea pigs in anyone's science experiments”, states Jim Emberger, spokesperson for the Taymouth Community Association.

    The promise of large-scale job creation appears over-exaggerated. In a recent presentation at the University of New Brunswick on October 22, 2011, Mr. Calvin Tillman, former mayor of Dish, Texas mentioned that since this industry requires highly skilled workers, most will be imported from outside the province to enable the industry to be more competitive at a time when stock market prices for natural gas are low.

    Sixty residents in Penobsquis have lost their well water and have experienced ground subsidence allegedly from potash mining and the added burden of shale gas drilling in their rural community. Some who want to move away have been unable to sell their homes. We ask, where is justice for the people of Penobsquis? Will regulations serve anyone when more things go wrong? A point made clear in the recent documentary by Rob Turgeon, ‘Be… Without Water’. (www.youtube.com/user/robfturgeon#p/a/u/1/aK0NMTMXHSw)

    Events on Wednesday, November 23rd are scheduled to begin with a gathering at the Provincial Legislature at 12:00 noon. A program with music and speakers will begin at 12:45 pm.

    Media Contacts:
    Jean Louis Deveau 506 442 1413 jlpdev@nbnet.nb.ca

    Julia Linke 506 367 0987 linkejul@gmail.com

    Terry Wishart 506 238 4001 t.wishart@banfrackingnb.ca

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Pour publication immédiate COMMUNIQUÉ 22 novembre 2011

    Rassemblement contre les gaz de schiste à Fredericton le 23 novembre

    FREDERICTON NB − Un rassemblement aura lieu à l’Assemblée législative demain le 23 novembre afin de protester contre l’exploitation des gaz de schiste au Nouveau-Brunswick.

    Des citoyennes et des citoyens ainsi que des groupes communautaires de l’ensemble du Nouveau-Brunswick convergeront vers Fredericton à l’ouverture de la Législature du Nouveau-Brunswick demain mercredi le 23 novembre pour signifier à l’administration Alward que l’exploration et l’extraction des gaz naturels en utilisant le forage horizontal avec des fluides de fracturation sous pression ne seront pas tolérées.

    Les membres des sections locales de toute la province du SCFP se joindront en solidarité à ceux qui s’opposent à l’exploitation des gaz de schiste. Lors de leur Convention nationale le 3 novembre dernier, ils ont adopté la résolution 96, qui déclare expressément à tous les niveaux de gouvernement que l’on doit mettre fin à l’exploitation des gaz de schiste parce que cette industrie « a failli de démontrer que de telles entreprises n’auraient pas de conséquences graves sur l’environnement et sur la santé de la population, » et que les gouvernements « sont manifestement mal préparés devant cet enjeu et qu’ils n’ont pas réussi à répondre aux préoccupations de la population. »

    Les NéoBrunswickois de toute la province dénoncent le développement non conventionnel de l’industrie des gaz de schiste. Le processus utilisé pour extraire les gaz de schiste non conventionnels a moins de 20 ans. Et il est la cause non contestée de dégâts écologiques, de tremblements de terre, de pollution atmosphérique, de pollution par le bruit, de dégradation des infrastructures et de l’utilisation immodérée et de l’empoisonnement irréversible de trillions de litres d’eau douce. Elle laisse dans son sillage des impacts nuisibles pour la vie des humains et des autres animaux.

    « Le devoir civique des résidents du Nouveau-Brunswick n’exige pas qu’ils servent de cobaye pour les expériences scientifiques de qui que ce soit, » affirme Jim Emberger, porte-parole de l’Association communautaire de Taymouth.

    Les promesses de créations d’emplois à grande échelle semblent très exagérées. Dans sa récente présentation à l’université du Nouveau-Brunswick le 22 octobre dernier, monsieur Calvin Tillman, ancien maire de Dish au Texas a mentionné qu’étant donné que cette industrie a besoin de travailleurs hautement qualifiés, la plupart d’entre eux proviendront de l’extérieur de la province afin de permettre aux opérations d’être plus compétitives au moment où les prix en bourse du gaz naturel sont bas.

    En effet, la collectivité de Penobsquis a perdu (60) puits et sources depuis plusieurs années. Les plateformes de forage pour les gaz de schiste qui contribuent au fonctionnement des processus de la mine de potasse sont dispersées dans les pâturages et les coteaux à l’amont de la Kennebecasis. Nous demandons, où se trouve la justice pour les habitants de Penobsquis? Est-ce que des règlementations vont servir qui que ce soit lorsque d’autres choses tournent mal? Un récent documentaire par Rob Turgeon donne une réponse très claire : « Vivez…sans eau » (www.youtube.com/user/robfturgeon#p/a/u/1/aK0NMTMXHSw)

    Les évènements de demain mercredi 23 novembre débuteront à midi lors du rassemblement devant l’Assemblée législative provinciale. Un programme de musique et de conférenciers suivra à midi et 45.

    Contacts pour les médias:
    Jean Louis Deveau 506 442 1413 jlpdev@nbnet.nb.ca

    Julia Linke 506 367 0987 linkejul@gmail.com

    Terry Wishart 506 238 4001 t.wishart@banfrackingnb.ca
  •  

    The UN Decade on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) comes to an end next year. What have we accomplished in Canada to support the Decade? What challenges did we face? And where do we go from here? It was these questions that shaped the discussion at a national ESD workshop I attended at the Canadian Commission for UNESCO annual meeting recently. In general, the workshop provided an interesting discussion, although it was a bit too much of listening to ourselves talk and not quite enough of concrete action items for my liking.

     

    Perhaps one of the most thought-provoking comments included the best definition of ESD – more often called sustainability education here in NB! – that I have ever heard. Here it is: ESD is about figuring out the kind of future we want and then preparing people with the skills, knowledge, and values they need to make that future a reality.

     

    The workshop helped me think about our various ESD initiatives in New Brunswick in terms of international priorities and those in other provinces. UNESCO has developed three priorities for ESD internationally; these have been adopted provincially in Manitoba. Should we in NB be focusing on these priorities also? The priorities are:

     

    • All schools have an ESD or sustainability plan by 2015,
    • Faculties of Education incorporate ESD into their teachers’ education programs, and
    • Vocational education (e.g., community collges) re-orient their programming to help us move from a “brown economy” to a “green economy.”

     

    There is research underway internationally that may help our cause here in the province. We, as “believers” know that ESD improves the quality of education. However, research is needed to demonstrate this to non-believers. This research is being undertaken by a number of countries working together to explore the links between ESD and quality education and to find qualitative and quantitative data to support these links.

    This workshop was attended by 29 representatives from organizations across the country. The official minutes can be found here.

  • Jim Emberger - Commentary, Telegraph-Journal, Daily Gleaner August 24, 2018

    At a recent oil and gas industry conference, Terry Spencer, head of natural gas infrastructure company, ONEOK, told the audience: “One of these days, one of these big ol’ fracs will be operated with nobody there..... We are as an industry working towards where we can operate 24/7, unattended.”

    He wasn’t forecasting the distant future.

    In 2016, the Houston Chronicle was already reporting,“These new rigs, using sophisticated software and robotics, could reduce the number of people working in the oil patch by up to 40 per cent.”  The article continues: “The Holy Grail [is] to not have to touch the pipe and totally automate the process.”

    The 2014 fossil fuel crash forced companies to slash the number of drilling rigs and lay off 440,000 workers. Although the number of rigs is slowly growing back, analysts say that half the workers may never return.

    That’s because the fracking industry, despite its growth, has always been mired in debt – the Wall Street Journal calculates US$280 billion. To have any chance of reaching profitability, the industry must cut costs, meaning eliminating jobs and increasing automation.

    For example, SWN, the American company once exploring in New Brunswick, has announced it will layoff 200 workers to save on annual personnel costs of $65 million.

    Since the fracking industry has always sold itself as a source of high-paying, blue-collar jobs, it doesn’t publicize that many of those jobs are now disappearing.  Replacing workers with machines is masked as “efficiencies” and “cost-savings,” and, with no apparent sense of shame, as “worker safety measures.”

    Industry debt also leads to numerous bankruptcies and company closures, posing financial threats to taxpayers and landowners in the form of thousands of abandoned, often leaking, gas and oil wells.

    Governments should have demanded sufficient funds from the industry in advance to cover the costs of closing wells, but did not. Industry claimed it couldn’t afford the upfront cost.  Now, bankruptcy laws that give creditors first access to the assets of insolvent companies leave little money to remediate abandoned wells.

    Saskatchewan’s auditor general estimates the problem will cost the province $4 billion, while Alberta, with its hundreds-of-thousands of wells, faces a mind-numbing $47 billion in future costs.  Saskatchewan has already asked Ottawa for a few hundred million until they can figure out a long-term plan, so we can surmise that federal and provincial taxpayers will be on the hook for bailout money.

    Any taxpayer bailout will be a bitter pill, as the industry already receives billions from Canadian taxpayer subsidies, another fact not discussed. The International Monetary Fund estimates that Canada’s subsidies to the natural gas industry are 44-per cent greater than its foreign aid payments.

    The British Columbia government, for instance, offers exemptions from income, sales and climate taxes, provides lower electricity rates, and offers extremely generous “royalty credits for fracking operations.”  The Energy Ministry calculates that these “credits” equal nearly $5 billion in lost royalty revenue.

    Despite generous subsidies, Alberta (our largest gas producer) has seen royalties plummet 90 per cent since 2008: from $5 billion down to $500 million.This explains why the Petroleum Services Association of Canada just announced a decrease in Canadian natural gas drilling this year, citing low natural gas prices and reduced demand.It noted: “Many companies are sitting at near break-even points or are still in negative territory.... This is not sustainable from a business continuity and competitiveness perspective,” and explains the “lack of attractiveness for investment.”

    These subsidies, debts and job losses occur in tandem, with multiple economists warning that market forces may turn Canada’s billions of dollars of fossil fuel infrastructure into worthless “stranded assets” by 2030.

    All of this news comes from industry or government sources.

    So why would conservatives, economists and various chambers of commerce members who write newspaper commentaries promoting shale gas not address any of these issues? One would expect that, as businesspeople, they would be aware of the industry’s financial and trade news.

    What are we to think when they endlessly repeat the meaningless phrase “responsible resource development” while displaying no more detailed knowledge about shale gas economics than they do about its health and environmental threats?

    Should we pin our economic hopes on an industry built on subsidies, debt and potentially huge costs to taxpayers, one that provides fewer jobs with each passing year, while putting our health, environment and climate at risk?

    Or, should we instead keep the moratorium on fracking, and choose a business sector with an economic case that is booming with jobs and prospects. Clean Energy Canada’s recent study of a basic energy efficiency plan for New Brunswick shows that by 2030 we could increase GDP by $5 billion and create 25,879 jobs.

    Going beyond the basic plan, and adding renewable energy, makes those numbers skyrocket. These aren’t imaginary figures. Jobs in energy efficiency and renewable energy far outnumber those in the fossil fuel industries, while ensuring a healthier, more sustainable, future.

    Jim Emberger is spokesperson for the New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance (NoShaleGasNB. ca)
  • Village of Gagetown Adopts Declaration of Environmental Rights
    written by Voices for Sustainable Environments and Communities

    On Monday Jan 15th, about 20 citizens turned out on a snowy wintery evening for the Village of Gagetown Council meeting, held at the Village Rec Council. They were there to see the Village Council issue its Environmental Rights Declaration in support of the Blue Dot movement. Blue Dot is an initiative of the David Suzuki Foundation that works toward the right to a healthy environment for all Canadians.
  • VOICE OF THE PEOPLE TOUR: Red Dot Poll Results Summary for Fredericton South, April 30, 2014

    1) Moratorium on shale gas

    2) Public health

    3) New Brunswick needs diverse set of solutions for jobs / economy
    - clean energy
    - Local value aded products
    - local agriculture and forestry

    4) Sustainable jobs. Clean jobs.

    5) Forest management agreement with JD Irving must be stopped

    6) First Nations should be consulted before entering into resource agreements

    7) No 'gag' orders and non-disclosure agreements should be allowed in NB

    8) Radioactive waste water

    9) Solar power

    10) Clean energy
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