• Come see why this property is so important.

    http://forestsinternational.org/projects/conservation-of-working-lands/

     

    Since early 2009, CFI has been working with organic farmers and sustainable woodlot owners Clark Philips and Susan Tyler, as well as the New Brunswick Community Land Trust (NBCLT), in order to develop a succession plan for a unique 650 acre farm and Acadian Forest woodlot called Whaelghinbran Farm. Clark (74) and Susan (72), have been farming organically and practicing ecological forestry on their woodlot for over 40 years. By carefully harvesting and marketing timber they have begun a process of restoration, working to achieve the health and diversity found within the Acadian Forest Eco-region prior to European settlement. In order to continue this legacy, Clark, Susan, CFI and the NBCLT are working to uphold the principles and techniques employed at Whaelghinbran Farm through a working lands conservation agreement. CFI intends to steward the farm and woodlot under the conservation easement with a community of interested organizations and individuals, and is striving to establish a rural training centre on site.This training centre will provide students from the region with the knowledge, skills, and network necessary to become involved in a movement rooted in ecologically-based working lands in the Acadian Forest Eco-region. The multi-stakeholder community-based ecological forestry practiced at Whaelghinbran will also provide a strong example of alternative approaches to woodland management in the region.

  • OBITUARY OF THE ACADIAN FOREST - With great sadness we mourn the sudden, tragic death of more than 12,600 acres/year of Acadian Forest which, until this year, had been placed in the care of its Trustee, the Province of New Brunswick, for heritage conservation purposes. The death was caused by a routine case of what the Province of New Brunswick calls “carefully managed clear cutting." The amount cut is equivalent to cutting Mactaquac Provincial Park 10 times every year and for the next 25 years.

    This part of New Brunswick's forest had been entrusted to the Province for perpetual care by rural and urban residents alike for the benefit of all generations. Felled by the tens of thousands, primarily along rivers and streams, the premature and suspicious death means this forest will no longer be able to provide much needed water flow, temperature and flood control.

    Along with more severe soil erosion and increased flooding in its communities, this tragic 'death by clear cutting' will further reduce fish populations, notably that of the pride of New Brunswick rivers, the Atlantic Salmon. As well, thousands of deer and countless other species of animals and plants associated with Old Growth Forests will now die because the shelter and food they need to survive that had been provided by the forest was, of course, also destroyed by the clear cut.

    The Acadian Forest is survived by a very distant relative, the Tree Plantation, unable to provide the same type of life-giving function of its now dead relative. Meanwhile, yet another 'unnatural death by clear cut' in New Brunswick is prompting calls for an inquest into what has been called the reckless endangerment of all the New Brunswick Forests by their Trustee, the Province. In a stunning admission, the Province of New Brunswick has admitted to openly colluding with serial clear cutters. Adding to the concern is the fact that the Forest estate was stripped of assets by 'serial clear cutters' before its death and so left nothing to the residents of New Brunswick.

    The dead forest, more than 10,000 years old and now gone forever, was predeceased by northern cod stocks off the Atlantic coast who also fell victim to "careful management" by their Trustees.

    In lieu of flowers and other tokens of mourning for this beloved member of New Brunswick's Natural Family, letters, e-mails, tweets and other expressions of outrage directed to Premier Brian Gallant, Natural Resources Minister Denis Landry, and your MLA are requested.

    Rest in peace Acadian Forest.
 © 2018 NBEN / RENB