Here are the participants from the year 2017!
There are many ways of getting involved in the environmental movement!

Locally
  • Join your school's environmental or green club! None? Make one! Reach out to your student council.
  • Volunteer for an environmental organization in your area! Here is a list of groups throughout the province.

Provincially
  • Join the Youth Environmental Action Network (YEAN)! YEAN is a network that creates opportunities for youth environmental groups throughout the province to connect, share knowledge and work together on common initiatives! Contact nben@nben.ca or call 855-4144 for more information.
Choosing a site with high conservation value
Your shoreline cleanup needs to be well-planned in order to make sure that your conservation efforts are beneficial for the environment in your community. Keep in mind that your cleanup must span a minimum of 3 hectares! Here are a few questions to help you identify your site:
  • Do you know of any locations that could benefit from your activity?
  • Do you know the community groups or other people in your community that could help you identify a site for your shoreline cleanup?
The New Brunswick Environmental Network can help you get in touch with groups in your community who can advise you; don’t hesitate to contact us for more information!

Once you decide where your activity will take place, you will have to find out who is the landowner (your municipality, etc.), contact said landowner and make sure you obtain the approval to conduct your cleanup. The shoreline might be owned by your municipality, the provincial government, a business, an individual or something similar.

Managing your waste
Your shoreline cleanup will generate waste that you will need to manage during and after your activity. It is important to inform your solid waste commission about your event to make the necessary arrangements in order to eliminate the waste you will gather.

Safety Information
It is very important to make sure that your cleanup event is safe for everyone participating. Please review this safety information (adapted from the Site Coordinator Manual on the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup’s website) to make sure that your event is injury-free:

General Safety
Use “Sharps” containers for the disposal of glass shards, hard plastic, and metal.

Water Safety
  • Watch where you step. Wet rocks and logs can be very slippery. Loose rocks can shift and move, causing you to fall.
  • Check river, lake, and wetland water levels before your cleanup day. Move your cleanup further away from the water’s edge if levels are too high.
  • If your cleanup is along an ocean shoreline, make sure you are aware of the local tide schedule.
  • If your cleanup is along a river shoreline, keep your participants a safe distance from the water. River currents can be much stronger and deeper than they appear.
Hazardous Waste
  • If you encounter any waste you think may be hazardous or toxic, mark the area with flagging tape and contact local authorities immediately.
  • Do not remove chemical containers or large drums or barrels and be very cautious with them, as their contents may be dangerous.
  • Make note of any markings on the container that may help authorities identify the contents.
Animals
  • Never approach any animal, dead or alive!
  • If you encounter an alive entangled animal, please notify the Department of Energy and Resource Development at 506-453-3826. NEVER attempt to detangle an animal yourself.
  • If you find a dead marine mammal, please notify the Department of Energy and Resource Development at the number above. Aquatic mammals that appear to be stranded without entanglement should be left for 24 hours. After 24 hours, please notify.
 
Check-list of for your clean-up activity
  • Garbage bags
  • Gloves
  • Proper footwear and clothing
  • Container for sharp objects
  • First Aid kit
  • Flagging tape
  • Flotation device
  • Emergency phone numbers
  • Camera/ video camera
  • Water and food
Choosing a site with high conservation value

Your tree planting project needs good planning to make sure that your conservation
efforts will be beneficial for the environment in your community. Here are a few questions to help you identify your tree planting site:
  • Do you know of any locations that could benefit from your activity?
  • Do you know the community groups or other people in your community that could help you identify a site for your tree planting activity?
  • Which tree species are best suited for your tree planting habitat?
The New Brunswick Environmental Network can help you get in touch with groups in your community who can advise you; don’t hesitate to contact us for more information!

Once you decide where your activity will take place, you will have to find out who is the landowner, contact the landowner and make sure you obtain the approval to plant your trees. The landowner could be your municipality, the provincial government, a business, or an individual in your community.


Native tree species to plant

Softwood species: 
  • Balsam fir
  • Eastern hemlock
  • Eastern white cedar
  • Tamarach
  • Pines (jack, red, white)
  • Spruces (black, red, white)

 Hardwood species:
  • Ashes (black, red, white)
  • Basswood
  • Beech
  • Birches (grey, white, yellow)
  • Butternut
  • Elm
  • Ironwood
  • Maples (red, silver, sugar)
  • Oaks (bur, red)
  • Poplars (balsam, largetooth, trembling)

How to plant your trees

There are a lot of documents out there that can offer great information on how to plant trees to maximize your trees survival rate. On the “Tree Canada” website, you will find a great document on how to plant and care for your trees (Canadian Forest Service - Natural Resources Canada. 1992), see the steps below! The website, "Space for Life", also includes a great guide.

Prepare the planting spot

  • Remove grass, weeds and ground cover (turf) within a 50-cm radius of the planting hole. These plants compete with the tree for water and nutrients.
  • Dig the hole at least twice as wide as the container or root ball (to accommodate the entire root system), and to the depth of the root ball.
  • Roughen the sides and bottom of the hole to allow root penetration.
  • If good quality soil is not available, break up the turf taken from the top and put it in the hole around the root ball, where it will break down into good rooting soil. Peat or loam, if added, would improve this mixture.
  • Soil in the hole should be moist, neither too wet nor too dry.
  • A cone-shaped mound of soil at the bottom of the hole is advised for bare-root trees. This will allow the roots to develop downward and outward into the surrounding soil.
Prepare and plant your tree with care

Bare-root:
  • Loosen the roots with a spray of water and straighten them to prevent doubling-under, crowding, and crossing. Do not expose the roots to direct sunlight or drying winds for more than a minute to avoid damaging the fine root hairs.
  • The root crown is set on the mound and the roots spread over and down the sides of the mound. Refill the hole with good quality soil, gently raising and lowering the tree while filling to eliminate air pockets.
Container:
  • Trees should be kept in the container until the last possible moment before planting.
  • Plant the tree so that the top of the root ball is flush with the top of the hole. Fill the hole in and around the root ball with good quality soil or soil removed from the hole. Tamp the soil around the root ball until the hole is two-thirds full.
  • Fill the remaining space with water to settle the soil and allow the hole to drain. Finish filling the hole with soil and make a ridge of soil around the root ball to direct water towards the roots.
Staking trees larger than one meter is recommended as it prevents dislodging by wind, people, and animals. Make sure the stake ties do not cause damage to the bark. The stakes should be removed after two or three growing seasons.

Check-list for your tree-planting activity
  • Gloves
  • Proper footwear and clothing
  • Watering can or buckets and water
  • Shovel(s)
  • Stakes and ropes (if needed)
  • Wheelbarrow (if needed)
  • First Aid kit
  • Camera/ video camera
  • Water and food
Projects must focus on conservation priorities and help restore New Brunswick's native habitat. Community groups who wish to participate must link up with a youth group or school.  No connections? No problem! We can help connect you with a youth group in your area.

Tree planting projects:
  • A minimum of 40 trees must be planted
  • Trees planted must be native species
  • Trees must be appropriate for planting site
Shoreline/riverside cleanup projects:
  • Cleanup must span a minimum of 3 hectares
 © 2018 NBEN / RENB