Media Advisory: Fundy Baykeeper honoured tonight by Atlantic Salmon Federation


Wednesday, May 17, 2017 — Fredericton

Attention news editors: The Fundy Baykeeper, a program of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, receives the Atlantic Salmon Federation’s top national honour, the T.B. “Happy” Fraser Award, during a gala ceremony at the Algonquin Hotel in St. Andrews tonight. Matt Abbott, the Fundy Baykeeper since 2011, accepts the award.

The Fundy Baykeeper, the flagship program of the Conservation Council’s Marine Conservation Program, was selected for its longstanding commitment to the ecosystems of the Bay of Fundy, where wild Atlantic Salmon are on life support, and its decades-long work to protect New Brunswick’s coastal environments from pollution.

“Our coastlines in New Brunswick are true treasures,” says Abbott. “From the sprawling tides of the Bay of Fundy, to the warm ocean waters at Parlee Beach, our work to protect these spaces is all about consistency, dedication, and the commitment of our team to achieve results over time.”

Matt Abbott is available for media interviews upon request.

To arrange an interview, contact:

Jon MacNeill
Communications Director
506-458-8747 (w) | 506-238-3539 (m)
jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

MEDIA RELEASE

Conservation Council welcomes investments to protect
health of people and ecosystem at Parlee Beach

Fredericton, May 5, 2017 — Today, the provincial government announced infrastructure investments and restrictions on new development specific to the Parlee Beach area. Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, issued the following statement.

“Today’s announcement is an important step to protect the health of our treasured Parlee Beach ecosystem and the families who swim and play there.

These investments, coupled with better impact assessment for new developments, including campgrounds, should speed up the repair of this valued beach ecosystem. Better sewage treatment, combined with smart education programs, will reduce harmful bacteria that can pollute our coast and jeopardize human health. Keeping our bays and beaches clean always pays off for our coastal economies.

Pollution from near shore developments on the Northumberland Strait, like campgrounds and roads,  won’t be solved by today’s announcement. The Conservation Council encourages the Minister of Environment to move the coastal zone protection policy from being a paper document to a regulation under the Clean Water Act, and to classify important bay areas to protect their health, like they currently do in Maine. Putting in place a comprehensive land use policy and much wider wetland and salt marsh buffer zones for the entire Northumberland Strait region would further safeguard public and environmental health.

Projects we will monitor closely with respect to Parlee Beach water quality include the cumulative effects assessment and protocols development (which will study the impact of the total pollution going into Shediac Bay, not just pollution from individual projects), and an independent ground survey of local wetlands to improve our understanding of their size and the ecological services these critical spaces provide.”

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Background

In April, the Conservation Council welcomed the provincial government’s decision to use Health Canada’s technical and science-based guidelines for beach water safety at Parlee Beach. The protocol includes daily water quality testing, seven days a week, with all monitoring results and public health advisories posted online for easy public access.

The province announced rules for notifying the public about water quality test results after it was revealed that high levels of fecal contamination in the water at Parlee Beach, including E. coli, went unreported for the past three summers.

Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) is bacteria found in the environment, foods, and intestines of people and animals. Although most strains of E. coli are harmless, others can make you sick and can cause kidney failure, urinary tract infections, respiratory illness and pneumonia. When we discover E. coli in water, it usually has come from sewage runoffs, and animal faecal matter. That’s why health officials all over the world carefully monitor E. Coli and its different strains.

Health Canada has set safe limits for E. Coli in drinking water and E. coli in recreational waters. The number of faecal bacteria considered unsafe for recreational swimming varies depending on whether the bacteria is found in freshwater or saltwater. If tests find more than an average of 35 for every 100 millilitres (just a wee bit less than 1/2 cup), it is declared unsafe for all and the beach is closed.

To arrange an interview, contact:

Jon MacNeill
Communications Director
Conservation Council of New Brunswick
506-458-8747 | 506-238-3539
jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

April 5, 2017

FREDERICTON – The Conservation Council of New Brunswick’s Executive Director, Lois Corbett, made the following comments in response to the provincial government’s announcement today about new rules and procedures for reporting water quality at Parlee Beach:

“It’s a smart protocol, one that will increase health protection. Deciding to use Health Canada’s technical and science-based guidelines for beach water safety is the right decision.”

“Testing the health of the water every day, seven days a week, when the beach is open, will provide our citizens, our local businesses, and our visitors with clear information — Minister Rousselle gave us exactly what we needed. ”

“And now that the testing, reporting and public communications issues have been resolved, we can next move more quickly to stop the pollution that contaminates the water.”

“That step is very important and will require both stopping harmful practices like filling in wetlands and salt marshes, and reducing human and animal waste — the main source of the health threats to swimmers. We need to attack all sources — whether it is business or farm runoff, the local sewage system, or private septic tanks and recreational boaters.”

“Reducing the sources of water pollution is something we all care about but, as individuals, and we sometimes feel we have little to contribute. Well, not this time. It’s all hands on deck to fix the problem and continue to make this beach, and others, a destination of choice.”

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  • You can read the government announcement here.
  • You can learn more about the new rules here.
  • You can read more about Parlee Beach here.
Falls Brook Centre as you know is a registered charity and demonstration centre, committed to finding and promoting practical solutions to today's sustainability challenges. We are dedicated to the goals of inspiring people to work together using environmentally sound practices to create thriving local communities. What does this look like? Highlighting local economies, renewable energy options, and economically and ecologically sound land management techniques that work on the quarter-acre to 5,000 acre scales. On the ground, this is all about education aimed at all ages and addresses. If this sounds like something you could be a part of, I encourage you to visit our website and social media pages and consider becoming a Board member to make a real difference in the lives of New Brunswickers.

http://fallsbrookcentre.ca/wp/get-involved/volunteer-opportunities/

From what I'm hearing most folks don't know what's been happening regarding a second nuclear reactor for New Brunswick and a large proposed underwater power line under the Bay of Fundy from Saint John to Boston.  Although there's lots of talk about good clean green energy it seems likely the plan is to carry electricity from tidal turbines strung across the head of the Bay of Fundy and possibly a second nuclear reactor in New Brunswick.  There seems to be a lot going on here under the bed covers unknown to most of the public and most in the environmental community.  People need to know what's happening and now.  Could you post the attached items up where they will attract people's attention and people will view them.

Reference: Second Nuclear Reactor Could Happen, Telegraph Journal, January 27, 2017

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PRESS RELEASE

CCNB’s Fundy Baykeeper applauds restart of Energy East Pipeline Review and calls for a reform of the NEB before the review moves forward

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick’s Fundy Baykeeper applauds the National Energy Board’s decision on Friday to restart the Energy East review process.

“This is an important decision, but not an unexpected one,” said Fundy Baykeeper Matt Abbott. “Given the questions of bias hanging over all decisions made by the last National Energy Board panel, the only way to move forward was to void all the past panel members’ decisions.”

The ruling was made following  the filing of a Notice of Motion with the NEB on Jan 10 by Ecojustice lawyers representing Transition Initiative Kenora (TIK) calling for the Energy East proceedings to be declared void as a consequence of reasonable apprehension of bias.  Read the Motion here.

The project’s 2016 hearings were suspended late last August, after complaints were filed against two NEB board members – Jacques Gauthier and Lyne Mercier– who met privately with former Quebec premier Jean Charest while he was being paid as a consultant to TransCanada Corp. The review panel recused itself shortly afterwards, prompting demands that the review process be restarted.

All decisions made by the previous panel members are void and will be removed from the official hearing record. Those who’ve already applied to participate need not reapply, but essentially everything re-starts.

Abbott says that this decision won’t fix the NEB process regarding Energy East. The current process was put in place by the Harper Government and has been roundly criticized by many.

“The Energy East review should be delayed until a modernized review process is in place. Given the problems with NEB that the Energy East review has brought into focus, it is clear that we cannot have confidence in the NEB as it is currently constituted,” said Abbott.

“In uncertain, stressful times, it is good to know that a massive, dangerous, project like Energy East does not loom as close as it appeared to a few short months ago.”

According the NEB media release issued this morning, previous decisions that have been voided include:

  • Determination that the Energy East and Eastern Mainline applications are complete;
  • Decision to review the Energy East and Eastern Mainline applications via a single hearing;
  • List of Participants and any subsequent individual rulings on participation;
  • Lists of Issues and factors to be included in the environmental assessments under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012; and Hearing Order.
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To arrange an interview contact: Matt Abbott at 506-321-0429

The Fundy Baykeeper works for the Conservation Council to defend the public’s right to a healthy Bay of Fundy. Matt uses a  well-marked boat to patrol the Fundy coastline from Alma to St. Stephen. The Fundy Baykeeper is also part of the international Waterkeeper Alliance.

For more information on how the proposed Energy East pipeline would affect the Bay of Fundy, read the National Resource Defense Council’s report on tanker traffic in the Bay of Fundy: Sensitive Marine Ecosystems Threatened by Energy East’s ‘Aquatic Pipeline.’

For a full list of New Brunswick waterways at risk from Energy East, check out our interactive map.

For more information on the risks of Energy East to the communities of the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine, read the Conservation Council’s report: Tanker Traffic and Tar Balls: What TransCanada’s Energy East Pipeline Means for the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine.

For more on the Energy East pipeline, check out:




PRESS RELEASE

STATEMENT BY CONSERVATION COUNCIL'S MATT ABBOTT ON THE APPOINTMENT OF THE PANEL TO REVIEW THE PROPOSED ENERGY EAST PIPELINE

January 10, 2017

(Fredericton, NB) The Conservation Council’s Fundy Baykeeper says it should be “back to the drawing board” for the review of the proposed Energy East pipeline project, the largest ever pipeline proposed in Canada – one that would cross over 300 rivers and streams in New Brunswick and would export oil from its terminus in Saint John by supertanker across the Bay of Fundy and down through the Gulf of Maine.

“The announcement of the replacement of the project’s review panel members is but one small part of a complicated, and sorely discredited, process,” said Matt Abbott.

“Federal Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr announced an expert panel in November to make recommendations on how the NEB can be modernized, especially with respect to First Nations consultation and support, improved public participation, credible information on the potential impact to Canada’s water systems, including the Bay of Fundy, and squaring oil export with Canada’s plan to reduce carbon pollution,” said Abbott.

“It’s difficult to see how the new panel could embark on any credible process without first seeing the results of the modernization review.“

CCNB first called for a restart of the project review in August, when conflict of interest allegations forced suspension of public hearings and the eventual recusal of the former EE review panel members.

Unresolved issues with respect to any review on the proposed pipeline include whether or not new panel members will hear from scientists, First Nations and environmental groups and fishermen from New Brunswick; whether they will extend the impact zone under review to include the whole Bay of Fundy and whether they will require a complete analysis of both the business case for the pipeline and the impact of eventual spills from it on the natural environment, said Abbott.

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To arrange an interview contact Matt Abbott at (506) 321-0429

For more information on how the proposed Energy East pipeline would affect the Bay of Fundy, read the National Resource Defense Council’s report on tanker traffic in the Bay of Fundy: Sensitive Marine Ecosystems Threatened by Energy East’s ‘Aquatic Pipeline’.

For a full list of New Brunswick waterways at risk from Energy East, check out our interactive map.

For more information on the risks of Energy East to the communities of the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine, read the Conservation Council’s report: Tanker Traffic and Tar Balls: What TransCanada’s Energy East Pipeline Means for the Bay of Fundy and Gulf of Maine.
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Media Advisory

Leading Canadian environmental organizations to outline expectations for Friday’s first ministers meeting on clean growth and climate change

December 7, 2016 (Ottawa, ON) — Erin Flanagan (Pembina Institute), Steven Guilbeault (Équiterre), Catherine Abreu (CAN-Rac), Dale Marshall (Environmental Defence) and Dr. Louise Comeau (CCNB) will host an online media briefing to outline expectations for Friday’s first ministers' meeting on climate change and will respond to questions.

Event: Media briefing and Q&A 
Date: Wednesday, December 7th 2016
Time: 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. (EST)
Location: via GoToMeeting webinar 
RSVP at: Media Briefing Q&A registration

Context: For the first time ever, Canadian political leaders are negotiating a pan-Canadian climate plan to meet or exceed the country’s 2030 emissions reduction target. This webinar will outline trends in Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions in light of recent announcements and will discuss the extent to which governments have made policy commitments commensurate with reducing national emissions by 30% below 2005 levels by 2030.

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Media inquiries:

Erin Flanagan (English / français)
Program Director, Federal Policy, Pembina Institute
587-581-1701

Kelly O’Connor
Communications Lead, Pembina Institute
416-220-8804

Louise Comeau
Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions, CCNB
506-238-0355
POUR PUBLICATION IMMÉDIATE

COMMUNIQUÉ DE PRESSE

5 décembre, 2016

Stop Spraying NB  a recueilli le plus grand nombre de signatures de pétition jamais ramassé au Nouveau-Brunswick :  13,439 autres signatures à ajouter pour un grand  total de 27,225 afin d’arrêter l’arrosage d’herbicides sur les forêts  publiques ainsi que sous les lignes d’Energie NB

FRÉDÉRICTON – Ce  mardi 6 décembre, 2016,  13,404 signatures ORIGINALES seront déposées à l’Assemblée législative provinciale demandant à ce que la province du Nouveau-Brunswick cesse l’arrosage de pesticides sur les forêts publiques et sous les lignes d’Energie NB. Cette troisième présentation de pétitions représente encore une fois des communautés tout autour de la province incluant des communautés francophones, anglophones et  autochtones.  La pétition continue de prendre son élan et SSNB va continuer  de soumettre d’autres signatures dans le futur.  Une délégation d’organisateurs de différentes communautés  à travers la province représentant "Stop Spraying NB-Arrêtons l’arrosage NB " feront le voyage vers Fredericton  pour une photo devant la législature mardi midi le 6 décembre,  2016.  Certains députés qui supportent la cause ont été invités à se joindre à nous pour cette photo. SSNB a reçu l’information qu’en plus du député de Frédéricton, David Coon, le député  Jake Stewart (sud-ouest Miramichi) va signer la pétition et va également se joindre à nous pour la photo. Le député Jake Stewart s’est  prononcé contre l’arrosage de la forêt durant la  dernière année, et nous sommes heureux qu’il se joigne à nous.

Programme pour la présentation de la pétition:

Mardi 6 décembre, 2016
12:00 (midi) -photo avec les députés supportant la cause
1:00 pm: entrée de façon pacifique dans l’édifice de l’Assemblée législative afin d’être témoin  de la remise de la pétition par le député de Frédéricton, David Coon,  et d’entendre les mots de support des députés qui supportent notre cause.
Endroit: Edifice de l’Assemblée législative provinciale
               706 rue Queen
               Fredericton, NB

Comme vous le savez, le mouvement pour l’arrêt de l’arrosage au Nouveau-Brunswick a subi une croissance rapide depuis la saison de chasse 2015 lorsque les chasseurs ont  observé qu’il n’y avait presque plus de chevreuils dans nos forêts publiques. L’effondrement catastrophique  du cheptel de chevreuil se poursuit, avec la population maintenant rendue au quart de ce qu’elle était 30 ans passés. Une campagne pour ramasser des signatures de pétition qui a  commencé le 16 décembre 2015 avec une soumission initiale de presque 1200 signatures de Kedgwick, a été suivie par la remise de 12,686 signatures le 18 mai, 2016. Cette pétition pour l’arrêt de l’arrosage d’ herbicides sur les forêts publiques et sous les lignes d’Energie NB  est maintenant la  plus GRANDE pétition enregistrée dans l’histoire du Nouveau-Brunswick. Notre  gouvernement a un devoir d’ écouter ces 27,225 électeurs. Ce nombre va continuer de croître, alors que  plusieurs membres de nos communautés deviennent actifs dans ce mouvement. Chaque semaine,  nous avons de nouvelles personnes prêtes à recueillir des signatures dans leur communauté.  En septembre 2016, un Néo-Brunswickois retraité, Amédée Boucher, s’est impliqué  activement pour la cause et a recueilli  7,000 signatures dans la Péninsule acadienne dans une courte période de 2 mois avec quelques autres résidents.  Donc, un événement fut planifié par des organisateurs de Tracadie, supporté par SSNB, afin de discuter de l’arrosage et a connu une bonne participation.  Ce soir-là, le député de Fredericton, David Coon, a pris le temps, malgré son horaire fort occupé, de voyager jusqu'à Tracadie en un vendredi soir, et a reçu un total de 12,877 signatures incluant les signatures recueillies par Amédée Boucher et un autre lot reçu par SSNB  de partout dans la province. Le 2 décembre, 2016 un autre lot de 566 signatures est arrivé dans le courrier de SSNB. Les députés libéraux locaux ont refusé d’assister à cette rencontre.

 "Les gens de la Péninsule acadienne refusent d’être empoisonnés," dit Amédée Boucher, responsable d’avoir recueilli un volume de signatures dans cette zone, "mais la signature de la pétition est seulement le premier pas. Ca va prendre votre présence le 6 décembre afin de laisser un message clair  à nos politiciens: assez, c’est assez." Les  données récentes du Maine Fish and Wildlife, Québec Chasse et Pêche, Ministère des  Ressources naturelles de la Nouvelle-Ecosse et du Nouveau-Brunswick démontre que le nombre de captures  dans le NB sont maintenant à 15% de ce qu’elles étaient  en 1985, alors qu’au Québec, le nombre de capture a triplé et dans le Maine, il est resté relativement stable pour cette même période. La combinaison de l’augmentation des  coupes  à blanc et de l'arrosage de glyphosates  sur les plantations en monoculture de bois mou ont éliminé une très grand quantité de nourriture des chevreuils, supprimant  l’approvisionnement en nourriture à  32,000 de ces bêtes chaque année. Les gens qui vivent près de la forêt ont eux-mêmes remarqué les effets sur la population de chevreuils au NB.

Un guide de la faune et  propriétaire de lots boisés privés, Léo Goguen de Rogersville, est en forêt constamment et a déjà déclaré , "Notre moyen de subsistence dépend de la chasse du gros et petit gibier. Irving non seulement empoisonne la viande qui nous permet de manger mais détruit de nombreux habitats qui permettent à la faune de survivre et de se reproduire.  Nous perdons le revenu des activités de loisirs et nos familles sont dépossédées de nourriture saine provenant de nos forêts.  Léo a aussi été victime de préjudice sur les  effets sur son moyen de subsistance comme propriétaire de lots boisés privés.

Le nord du Nouveau-Brunswick  est grandement troublé par ce qui se passe: "Nous,  à EcoVie, sommes très préoccupés  par ce qui arrive dans nos forêts", dit Clément Arpin, propriétaire à la retraite d’une ancienne usine à valeurs ajoutées, de Kedgwick. "28% de toutes les forêts arrosées au Canada sont au NB et le NB représente 0.7% de la superficie de notre pays. C’est beaucoup d’arrosage de pesticides tout autour nous! Nos belles forêts  mixtes sont transformées en plantations .... une monoculture n’est pas une forêt.  Nous devons réaliser qu’une forêt diversifiée nous apporte de la diversité dans les emplois et une stabilité dans notre économie. On ne peut pas faire du sirop d’ érable  avec des épinettes. Alors pourquoi tuer nos feuillus alors que nos érablières  ont  augmenter leurs revenus  de 1000% dans la dernière  décennie comme l’a déclaré notre Premier Ministre, Brian Gallant, lors d’une de ses visites à Kedgwick?  On doit travailler avec le forêt, mettre nos gens au travail au lieu d’utiliser des pesticides qui détruisent notre belle diversité."

Le député David Coon est depuis longtemps défenseur de la cause pour l’arrêt de l’arrosage d’ herbicides sur les forêts et sous les lignes d’Energie N.B. Le 2 décembre, 2016, David Coon a fait cette puissante déclaration: "Arrêtons la coupe à blanc intensive et disons au revoir à l’arrosage d’herbicides » :
http://greenpartynb.ca/en/8-news/1007-stop-the-runaway-clearcutting-and-say-goodbye-to-herbicide-spraying. Cette citation dans sa déclaration en dit long: "Notre province  est une de trois dernières provinces canadiennes s'accrochant à cette pratique, malgré de nombreuses pétitions semblables à celle-ci , et des voix s’objectant depuis longtemps provenant de nos milieux ruraux . Ils ont droit à un environnement sûr, à vivre sans peur pour leur bien-être et celui de la faune qui habite nos forêts." "Le fait que ce sont les contribuables qui paient pour l’arrosage de nos forêts à un coût de $ 2.4m/année est juste ridicule", dit le Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, organisatrice du groupe SSNB. "De plus,  notre gestion forestière crée moins emplois que jamais auparavant, ce qui ne fait aucun sens. Nous avons besoin de remettre au travail nos équipes d’éclaircisseurs.  Nous laissons des travailleurs formés assis chez eux pour soutenir une pratique de gestion forestière qui est non durable.   Ces gens pourraient être au travail et contribuer à notre économie au lieu d’être en manque d’emploi."

SVP venez rencontrer des membres pour l’arrêt de l’arrosage  et autres Néo-Brunswickois qui sont grandement préoccupés par la poursuite de cette pratique en dehors l’édifice de l’Assemblée législative ce mardi 6 décembre, 2016 à midi. Tous les dirigeants politiques  et députés sont invités à assister et démontrer leur soutien.

Contacts pour les médias: (seront présents à l’événement à Frédéricton)
Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, SSNB,Fredericton, cellulaire 506-292-7503 (contact médias anglais)
André Arpin, ECOVIE , Kedgwick, cellulaire: 506-284-0593 (contact médias français)
Amédée Boucher, Péninsule acadienne, cellulaire: 709-792-4033

New Post from New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance

Let’s close the door on shale gas development once and for all

Commentary by Jim Emberger (Fredericton Gleaner, Nov 23, 2016) We applaud the Gallant government’s decision to amend the Clean Environment Act to ban the disposal of fracking wastewater in municipal and provincial sewage treatment systems.    The scientific studies behind the decision have long noted that municipal wastewater systems were not…

Read more …

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Media Advisory

CCNB available for comment on new report calling on federal government 
to phase-out coal powered electricity generation by 2030

What: Dr. Louise Comeau, the Conservation Council’s Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions, will be available to respond to questions about a new report, Out with the coal, in with the new: National benefits of an accelerated phase-out of coal-fired power. The report will be released in Ottawa by the Pembina Institute in collaboration with CCNB and other health and environmental groups. The report assesses the potential health and climate change benefits from phasing coal out of electricity production by 2030.

When: Monday, November 21, 2016, 11 am. Atlantic

Who: Dr. Louise Comeau Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions.

Where: Conservation Council of New Brunswick, 180 St. John St., Fredericton, NB

Why: Burning coal to generate electricity contributes to air pollution affecting human health, as well as climate change through high levels of greenhouse gases per MWh of electricity produced. There is a global movement away from coal to secure health and climate protection benefits. We are asking the federal Government to announce an accelerated coal phase-out in the lead up to First Ministers meeting in Ottawa December 9, 2016.

Contacts:Louise Comeau, louise.comeau@conservationcouncil.ca506 238 0355
Barb MacKinnon, New Brunswick Lung Association, barb.mackinnon@nb.lung.ca506 455 8961
The New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance is proud to support the lawsuit filed by Elsipogtog First Nation, on behalf of the Mi’kmaq Nation, to claim Aboriginal title to the Mi’kma’ki district of Sikniktuk in New Brunswick.

Our support is grounded in many things. In recent history we have been allies against a common enemy that threatened all of us with the contamination of our water, air and land. Many of our members, both Anglophone and Francophone from around the province, stood with the people of Elsipogtog as they peacefully defended their land. Some were arrested alongside them and still others sent money and supplies to support the cause.

We have also stood shoulder to shoulder with our other indigenous allies, the Wolastoqewiyik, in the peaceful defense of mother earth, understanding that such actions are often necessary to protect that which sustains life when it is threatened.

We also support this suit because we are joined with First Nations by history, including the mutual signing of treaties in centuries past. While we cannot undo the hardships that befell First Nations in the years since those treaties were signed, we can say—along with the Supreme Court of Canada—that the passage of time does not diminish the rule of law.  Treaties signed remain treaties to be respected and enforced.

Canada’s governments and citizens alike are thus obligated both legally and morally to acknowledge the terms of those treaties which, beyond dispute, entitle the First Nations the right to protect the water, air and land necessary to support their way of life.

By doing so we also acknowledge that we are helping New Brunswick, and the world, rediscover the values that are necessary for our continued existence.

Jim Emberger, Spokesperson
New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance


Kenneth Francis accepting solidarity statement on Aboriginal Title Claim from Jim Emberger, NBASGA @ NBEN Annual Meeting (photo Mark D’Arcy)
Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick Chapter (CPAWS NB) is encouraging New Brunswickers to get involved in a public consultation on the provincial government’s proposed construction of snowmobile trails and hub in Mount Carleton Provincial Park. The provincial Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture has released an environmental assessment report on the proposal, and has invited members of the public to submit comments before November 21.

“CPAWS NB is very concerned about the impact of this project on the wilderness and wildlife of our iconic and wildest provincial park,” says Roberta Clowater, CPAWS NB Executive Director. “Unfortunately, the environmental assessment report does not do a good job of identifying the potential environmental impacts of such a trail. We encourage all New Brunswickers to share their views on this proposed project with our provincial government.”

CPAWS New Brunswick has reviewed the Environmental Assessment report, and developed a summary of comments that it hopes will contribute to the public discussion around this proposed development at Mount Carleton Provincial Park.

The summary can be downloaded at: http://cpawsnb.org/images/upload/key_messages_EIA.pdf

Our review found that:
• The provincial government has apparently not done surveys to determine if there are habitats for species at risk, such as bald eagles, Canada lynx, or Gaspé shrews along the proposed development route, especially the new snowmobile trail up the side of Mount Carleton.
• The report dismisses the potential impacts of snowmobile noise and compaction of snow on wildlife, ignoring a significant body of research that indicates snowmobiling can negatively impact moose, bald eagles, hibernating bears and small mammals over the long term.
• The report also ignores evidence that snowmobiles and groomers can reduce winter survival for small mammals by compacting snow or collapsing the tunnels they use to search for food, which could affect food sources for owls, hawks, Canada lynx, foxes, and American marten – resulting in impacts up the food chain.

“Mount Carleton Provincial Park is one of our most treasured landscapes and the provincial government is supposed to protect it as a beautiful wild place for all New Brunswickers to enjoy, now and in the future. The significant gaps in the assessment report reinforce CPAWS NB’s belief that the proposed new snowmobile trail up the side of Mount Carleton should not move forward. It is difficult to see how the Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture can undertake this part of the project in a way that avoids or mitigates the potential impacts on wildlife and trail erosion. We hope the environmental assessment process gives serious consideration to all of the missing information related to this project, especially given the public expectation for higher scrutiny of development proposals in a provincial park,” Clowater noted.

The public can submit comments on or before November 21 to: lynn.white@gnb.ca or mailed to Lynn White, Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1.
COMMUNIQUÉ DE PRESSE

L’arrosage de pesticides dans nos forêts vous préoccupe? Vous désirez en savoir plus sur cette pratique dans notre région? Un grand rassemblement est organisé par un groupe de citoyens concernés par l’arrosage et ses répercussions sur la santé :

Vendredi le 18 novembre à 7 :00
Au Marché Centre-Ville
3416 rue Principale
Tracadie, N.-B.

Un total d’au moins 14,000 signatures pour l’Arrêt de l’arrosage au NB vont être présentées lors de cette soirée. David Coon, chef du Parti Vert du N.B., a accepté de recevoir et remettre la pétition à l’Assemblée législative à Frédéricton. Il sera donc présent à cette rencontre. De ces 14,000 signatures, un total de 8,000 signatures ont été amassées dans la Péninsule acadienne en seulement 3 mois pour la campagne continue de Stop Spraying NB (14,000 signatures accumulées tout autour de la province ont déjà été soumises à l’Assemblée législative du NB en Mai 2016). Les autres 6000 signatures ont été reçues de plusieurs citoyens de partout dans le reste de la province pour le groupe Stop Spraying NB. La Péninsule fait maintenant partie du mouvement provincial pour l’arrêt de l’arrosage STOP SPRAYING N.B. Mais en plus des forêts, les gens de ce coin de la province sont aussi énormément préoccupés par l’arrosage dans la culture des bleuetières. « Les gens de la Péninsule ne veulent plus être arrosés de poison », dit Amédée Boucher, responsable d’avoir recueilli une grosse partie des signatures, «  mais signer la pétition n’est que la première étape. Ça va prendre votre présence le 18 novembre pour laisser un message clair à nos politiciens : assez, c’est assez ». Il invite tous les organismes qui ont à cœur nos forêts, la nature, la santé et les générations futures à venir les appuyer. Mad. Nancy Benoit, mère de trois jeunes enfants ,ajoute « Le taux de cancer augmente de façon tragique et à chaque année, chaque famille est touchée par cette maladie et de plus en plus jeune. C’est plus que le temps qu’on y voit ». M. Eloi Benoit, pour sa part, croit «qu’ il faut penser à nos générations futures et que si on continue comme ça, on s’en va dans la mauvaise direction. De plus, qui prend soin des animaux? » de conclure M. Benoit. On vous attend donc en grand nombre!

Nous avons maintenant soumis un total de 28,000 signatures depuis le début de la campagne en décembre 2015.

Pour plus d’information, vous pouvez contacter Nancy Benoit au 506-397-0683.
Le 9 novembre 2016, la Première nation d'Elsipogtog dépose une réclamation au nom de la Nation Mi'kmaq pour le titre aborigène du district Mi'kma'ki de Sikniktuk, au Nouveau-Brunswick.

«Cette revendication concerne la protection de nos terres et de nos eaux pour nos enfants et nos générations futures», a déclaré Elsipogtog Chief Arren Sock. "Nous ne pouvons pas rester en place pendant que le gouvernement nous ignore et prend des décisions qui menacent les terres traditionnelles des Mi'kmaq. Il est temps pour nous d'exercer nos droits et responsabilités pour protéger notre territoire. "

Les Mi'kmaq, y compris les ancêtres d'Elsipogtog, ont signé des traités de paix et d'amitié avec la Couronne britannique dans les années 1760. Les traités n'incluaient pas la remise des Mi'kmaq de leurs terres. Dans la revendication, Elsipogtog demande à la Cour de confirmer que la Nation Mi'kmaq continue de détenir des titres et droits autochtones à Sikniktuk et d'ordonner des injonctions empêchant la destruction des terres, de l'eau, de l'air et des forêts.

"Nous voulons offrir de l'espoir et de la force à nos jeunes en prenant position pour protéger le titre et les droits des Mi'kmaq", a déclaré Kenneth Francis, porte-parole de Kopit Lodge, qui représente Elsipogtog sur les questions de développement des ressources. «Le gouvernement fédéral a promis une nouvelle relation avec les peuples autochtones basée sur le partenariat et le respect et qui est conforme à la Déclaration des Nations Unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones. Malheureusement, nous voyons encore le Canada et la province méconnaître nos droits et prendre des décisions qui menacent la santé de notre peuple et de nos terres. En déposant cette demande, nous demandons aux deux paliers de gouvernement de prendre les démarches nécessaires afin que nos droits soient pris au sérieux.

La revendication vient à un moment où les peuples autochtones et non autochtones du Nouveau-Brunswick ont 
​​à maintes reprises soulevé des préoccupations au sujet des décisions du gouvernement concernant les terres et les eaux dans le territoire des Mi'kmaq.

«Elsipogtog entend continuer à travailler avec nos voisins autochtones et nos alliés canadiens pour assurer la protection des terres et des eaux qui nous soutiennent», a déclaré le chef Sock. «En tant que partie de la nation Mi'kmaq, nous avons la responsabilité d'agir comme intendants de notre territoire. Réaffirmer notre droit de prendre des décisions sur nos terres et nos eaux est un élément essentiel de la sauvegarde de Sikniktuk pour tous nos avantages à long terme.



Contacts médias:

Chef Arren Sock: 506-523-8705
Kenneth Francis, porte-parole, Kopit Lodge: 506-523-5823
Bruce McIvor, avocat-conseil: 604-785-0327
Bird Feeding Basics

Nature Moncton Workshop

Sunday, November 27, 2016. 1:00 -4:00 pm

Tankville School, 1665 Elmwood Dr., Moncton







Nelson Poirier will give a session on Bird Feeding Basics on Sunday November 27, 1:00-4:00 pm at the Tankville School, 1665 Elmwood Dr., Moncton.

Topics dealt with will include setting the best buffet that will attract the biggest variety of visitors, suggested feeder types with pros and cons, placement of feeders to best protect yet enjoy your visitors’ presence, getting to know your guests with bird guides/binoculars, the different behavior expectations of your visitors, surprise visitors, placing the "unwelcome" matt out for unwanted visitors, and suggestions on hygiene.

All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not. $8 fee per participant to cover costs.
Select Committee on Climate Change Report Could Set Stage for a Sustainable New Brunswick

Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions

October 24, 2016

The Final Report of the Select Committee on Climate Change is a testament to the value of making our voices heard. Members of the eight-member, all-party committee (http://www.conservationcouncil.ca/select-committee-engages-all-nbers-in-growing-the-green-economy/) listened to New Brunswickers and have delivered a report that could lay the foundation for long-term sustainability and stable jobs while meeting our climate protection goals.

The Conservation Council is calling on the Government to adopt the Committee’s recommendations and to tell New Brunswickers in its November 2 Speech from the Throne how it intends to convert the recommendations into action.

The Select Committee’s recommendations closely align with the recommendations the Conservation Council made it in its climate action plan. Our climate action plan proposals (http://www.conservationcouncil.ca/our-programs/climate-and-energy/) included calling on Government to phase coal out of electricity production by 2030 and to move toward a zero emitting system by expanding its commitment to renewable energy.  The Select Committee calls for fossil-fuel free electricity system by 2030 and an increase in the Renewable Portfolio Standard to 60% from 40%. We called for a carbon pricing regime where revenue would be used to finance investments in deep retrofits of buildings, including social housing, and to create incentives to transform transportation so it relies more on clean electricity. The Select Committee recommends the creation of a Climate Fund to do just that.

With respect to governance, the Select Committee also listened, calling as the Conservation Council did, for introduction of a Climate Change Act to set in law a provincial greenhouse gas reduction target of 40% below 1990 levels by 2030 and by 80 percent below 2001 levels by 2050.  The Committee also called on Government to strengthen building codes, planning legislation and guidelines, and procurement rules to require low-polluting choices. With respect to Government operations, the Select Committee calls on Government to establish a cabinet committee on climate change, chaired by the Premier, and to strengthen the capacity of the Climate Change Secretariat to get things done.

We want to thank the Committee for its hard work and for so respectfully listening to New Brunswickers. Now we wait to hear whether Government respects the Committee’s work as much as the Conservation Council does.

For more information, contact: Louise Comeau, louise.comeau@conservationcouncil.ca; 506 238 0355
Holiday greetings!

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick is excited announce that our upcoming holiday edition of Eco-Alert – our seasonal informative magazine enjoyed by over 10,000 English and French readers throughout the province – will be celebrating the many local NB producers that make buying local worth every penny!

Considering this, we are offering special holiday discounted pricing for advertisements in this issue and we would love to help spread the word about your organization this holiday.

Eco-Alert is a bilingual publication and reaches a wide demographic in New Brunswick and we think Eco-Alert would be a great fit for your business. Help us make buying local to be the new gift of choice this holiday!

You can view our rates here. We even have rates as low as $75 for special, smaller business card-sized ads!

Check out an online version of our latest issue of Eco-Alert here.

If you are interested in purchasing ad space, would like to receive a copy of our magazine, have any questions, or, better yet – have a story you want to share - please don't hesitate to give us a call at 458-8747.

We look forward to hearing from you,

 The Conservation Council of New Brunswick
Enjoy an elegant evening at The Cocoa Room in the beautiful Chocolate River Station. Join the Southeast Chapter of the Conservation Council on Sunday, October 23rd, as we celebrate all that is local with our annual 100 Mile Dinner fundraiser. A 3-course meal, guest speakers, local music, silent auction, vendor fair, and the much anticipated presentation of the Environmental Journalism Award in memory of Beth McLaughlin will make for a memorable evening indeed!




Tickets are limited and must be purchased in advance in person at The Corn Crib (337 Mountain road) or online on Eventbrite by following the link below:




https://www.eventbrite.com/e/100-mile-dinner-tickets-27824167835


100 Mile Dinner Poster
Oct. 14 2016
CCNB_Logo.png

Attention News Editors: Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, issued the following statement about the Department of Environment and Local Government’s report, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick - Summary of Comments, released today. She is available for comment.

The Summary of Comments report documents the feedback from public information sessions, stakeholder sessions held across the province, and online and written submissions to the Department of Environment in response to the March 1, 2016, Discussion Paper, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick.

The Minister also announced that the Department is establishing a technical working group to provide recommendations on water classification.

“The report has fairly captured the importance of protecting New Brunswick's precious water. The advice from the public, and the wealth of first-hand experience included in its pages from those working on the front lines provides a clear call to work together to produce a modern, effective and efficient water protection strategy,” said Corbett.

The Conservation Council knows that a comprehensive water protection strategy for New Brunswick will:

  • be science-based, involving baseline data, cumulative impacts, e-flows (the minimum amount of water required to sustain aquatic life in rivers and streams), and be tailored to meet the needs of each of the 13 watersheds in N.B.;

  • set goals for water quality objectives;

  • protect both surface waters (lakes, streams, rivers) and groundwater as well as our marine coastal areas;

  • be enforceable with a modern legal framework, including water classification for the province's rivers;

  • be transparent, involving consultations with First Nations, businesses, farmers, municipal officials and citizens; and,

  • be accountable, involving monitoring and regular reporting to the public on the progress of goals and objectives outlined in the water protection strategy.

“We are especially pleased to see the Minister is committed to water classification as a critical part of an overall water protection strategy by setting up a technical advisory group. I was encouraged to see support for this and for all the other important elements reflected in the Summary Comments paper. This clears the way for the government to create a comprehensive and progressive strategy, one based in modern law,” said Corbett.

-30-

Read the report, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick: Summary of Comments, here. 

Read the original March 1, 2016, Discussion Paper, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick, here.

To arrange an interview, contact: 

Emily McPhee, Communications

Office:
 458-8747
Cell: (639) 571-3388  
Email: emily.mcphee@conservationcouncil.ca
 
Oct. 14 2016

Statement on Provincial Water Protection Strategy


CCNB_Logo.png

Attention News Editors: Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, issued the following statement about the Department of Environment and Local Government’s report,Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick - Summary of Comments, released today. She is available for comment.

The Summary of Comments report documents the feedback from public information sessions, stakeholder sessions held across the province, and online and written submissions to the Department of Environment in response to the March 1, 2016, Discussion Paper, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick.

The Minister also announced that the Department is establishing a technical working group to provide recommendations on water classification.

“The report has fairly captured the importance of protecting New Brunswick's precious water. The advice from the public, and the wealth of first-hand experience included in its pages from those working on the front lines provides a clear call to work together to produce a modern, effective and efficient water protection strategy,” said Corbett.

The Conservation Council knows that a comprehensive water protection strategy for New Brunswick will:

  • be science-based, involving baseline data, cumulative impacts, e-flows (the minimum amount of water required to sustain aquatic life in rivers and streams), and be tailored to meet the needs of each of the 13 watersheds in N.B.;

  • set goals for water quality objectives;

  • protect both surface waters (lakes, streams, rivers) and groundwater as well as our marine coastal areas;

  • be enforceable with a modern legal framework, including water classification for the province's rivers;

  • be transparent, involving consultations with First Nations, businesses, farmers, municipal officials and citizens; and,

  • be accountable, involving monitoring and regular reporting to the public on the progress of goals and objectives outlined in the water protection strategy.

“We are especially pleased to see the Minister is committed to water classification as a critical part of an overall water protection strategy by setting up a technical advisory group. I was encouraged to see support for this and for all the other important elements reflected in the Summary Comments paper. This clears the way for the government to create a comprehensive and progressive strategy, one based in modern law,” said Corbett.

-30-

Read the report, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick: Summary of Comments, here. 

Read the original March 1, 2016, Discussion Paper, Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick, here.

To arrange an interview, contact: 

Emily McPhee, Communications

Office:
 458-8747
Cell: (639) 571-3388  
Email: emily.mcphee@conservationcouncil.ca
-=-=-

 

 
NATURE MONCTON VISIT TO MAGNETC HILL ZOO

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2016

MEET AT 10:00 AM

THE PHILOSOPHY OF ZOOS HAS CHANGED CONSIDERABLY OVER THE YEARS. NOW VERY FEW ANIMALS IN ZOOS ARE TAKEN

FROM THE WILD, BUT INSTEAD THEY ARE BRED IN CAPTVITY, AND MANY SPECIES ENDANGERED IN THE WILD AND BRED

THIS WAY ARE RELEASED BACK INTO THEIR NATURAL HABITAT TO BOLSTER NUMBERS.

ON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, NATURE MONCTON MEMBERS WILL BE GIVEN A SPECIAL OPPORTUNITY TO SEE THE

ANIMALS AT THE ZOO AND SOME BEHIND-THE-SCENES ACTVITES IN ACTVE PROGRESS. THIS TRIP WILL BE LED BY BRUCE

DOUGAN, GENERAL MANAGER OF THE MAGNETC HILL ZOO.

MANY OF US MAY NOT BE AWARE THAT THE MAGNETC HILL ZOO, HERE ON OUR DOORSTEPS, IS ONE OF THE MORE

RECOGNIZED ZOOS IN CANADA FOR ITS PROGRAMS AND DISPLAYS.

MEET AT 10 AM AT THE MAGNETC HILL ZOO PARKING LOT ON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15. FAMILY AND FRIENDS ARE

WELCOME.

ADULT (18+) $11

SENIOR/YOUTH (12-17) (60+) $10

CHILD (4-11) $8
ccnb-logo-hr
September 29, 2016

PRESS RELEASE

Fredericton, N.B. – A national assessment by the Pembina Institute of provincial progress on climate action commitments finds New Brunswick at the back of the pack on climate action.The Race to the Front: Tracking Pan-Canadian Climate Progress and Where We Go from Here report, released in collaboration with the Conservation Council, sets the context for an all-important meeting of Environment Ministers Monday, October 3 in Montreal.

The meeting of the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) is expected to approve options developed by four federal-provincial working groups to meet commitments made in Paris at the United Nations Climate Conference in December 2015. CCME recommendations will go to Premiers and the Prime Minister to support final negotiations leading to a meeting of First Ministers (FMM) in November. The FMM is expected to finalize a framework where each province would be required to meet certain basic climate action requirements such as putting in place carbon pricing regime meeting similar price and coverage benchmarks across Canada. Provinces failing to do so by a certain date would have a carbon charge imposed by the federal government (the backstop). The federal Government is also expected to accelerate regulations to phase coal out of electricity production. The Pembina Institute report assesses where provinces currently are with respect to climate action and highlights additional actions required by provinces and the federal Government.

The Conservation Council has published a provincial climate action plan detailing recommendations for doing our fair share to cut carbon pollution. Proposed actions could improve energy efficiency and increase the supply of renewable energy in buildings, industry and transportation, and create jobs at home.

“New Brunswick shows weak progress on climate action, but we believe the province can make a positive contribution to Canada’s pollution reduction goals. To reduce emissions in the near term, New Brunswick must implement an economy-wide carbon price with funds raised invested in greenhouse gas reductions, and it needs to agree to phase coal out of electricity production no later than 2030,” says Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions.

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick is committed to doing its part to help New Brunswick move to a 100% renewable energy future by creating awareness and advancing practical solutions through research, education and policy development.As a local environmental organization, CCNB supports the transition to clean energy in New Brunswick and what’s being done to reach renewable goals.

For more information, contact: Dr. Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Solutions, CCNB, Tel. (506)238-0355

Download the Pembina Report here:

As a co-applicant in a judicial review for the proposed snowmobile grooming hub project at Mount Carleton Provincial Park, I was pleased to hear that the Department of Tourism had decided to register this project for an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). An EIA means that Tourism would need to explain what negative impacts the grooming hub might have had on the park. But,  somehow Tourism received permission from the Department of Environment to have two of the 12 components of this project exempted from their EIA registration document—the bridge at the ford between Bathurst Lake and Camp Lake and the other at Moose Brook. This means that the EIA for this project has been irreconcilably compromised.  Note that in every deliberation we have had with Tourism on this project, the bridges have always been presented to us as being important components of the snowmobile grooming hub.  So, when Chief Ron Tremblay and I met with the Department of Environment to find out how it happened that the bridges had been exempted, we learned that the decision Environment made was based on the information that they had received, and that whether or not that information was correct was immaterial. It has therefore been extremely disappointing for us to learn that the bridge work at Mount Carleton has now been allowed to start. Our take home lesson is that it appears that New Brunswick’s EIA regulations can be tampered with and that whenever this happens, there is no remedy.

New Brunswickers are invited to read the Environmental Impact Assessment document for the snowmobile grooming hub project and to please make their comments/concerns known to both the Department of Tourism and Department of Environment.  A pdf of this report may be found on the web at: http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/env/pdf/EIA-EIE/Registrations-Engegistrements/documents/EIARegistration1444.pdf

Jean Louis Deveau
Covered by CBC, Radio Canada, Acadie Nouvelle:


http://www.acadienouvelle.com/actualites/2016/08/24/glyphosate-occupation-pacifique-contre-larrosage-restigouche-video/?pgnc=1

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/atlantique/2016/08/24/015-acadie-nouveau-brunswick-epandage-herbicide-kedgwick.shtml

MEDIA RELEASE: AUGUST 23, 2016
COMMUNIQUE DE PRESSE URGENT 23 AOUT, 2016
Les joyeux campeurs protegent notre avenir et nos forets
(ENGLISH TEXT FOLLOWS)
Dans le Restigouche ouest, un groupe communautaire avait depuis trois mois l'intention d'occuper une clearcutting qui devait être arrosé cette année avec l'herbicide glyphosate. « Nous devons cesser d'empoisonner nos forêts, protéger la faune et la flore, et sauver l'environnement pour les générations à venir », a déclaré Francine Levesque, membre du groupe EcoVie, situé dans la région de Kedgwick-Saint-Quentin.
Plus tôt cette semaine , un site a été choisi pour établir un campement pour protéger l'environnement . « Le plan original était de garder l'action en silence, » a déclaré Jean MacDonald, un autre membre de EcoVie. « Mais vous savez que nous sommes dans une petite communauté. Il est devenu difficile de garder tout cela en silence, étant donné l'intérêt des gens pour arrêter l'arrosage. Quelqu'un passe près de notre camp et a pris des photos et a été le partage sur Facebook.»
« Maintenant, nous recevons plusieurs offres de support », a déclaré Francine . « Nous ne sommes seulement un petit groupe de personnes . Nous aurions souhaite que le plan d'action soit dévoilé lors de la réunion mensuelle du groupe de la Paix et de l'Amitié (Peace & Friendship Alliance) le samedi 27 Août à Kedgwick River. L'Alliance comprend acadienne , autochtone et anglophone du Nouveau-Brunswick qui sont fortement opposés à l'arrosage. Mais presentement le chat est sorti du sac " .
Les “Joyeux campeurs” sont maintenant situés sur le Chemin de la Shop a Savon, un peu en dehors de la route 17 , près de l'ancienne église de White’s Brook. Un code très sévère de l'éthique et de la non-violence sont mis en application sur le site.
(English next page)
Happy Campers Protecting our Future and our Forest
In Restigouche West, a community group has had plans for three months to occupy clearcuts scheduled to be sprayed with Glyphosate herbicide. “We need to stop this poisoning of the woods, to bring back the wildlife, and protect the environment for future generations,” said Francine Levesque, a member of EcoVie, which is centred in the Kedgwick and Saint Quentin communities.
Earlier this week, a site was chosen to make this stand for the environment. “The original plan was to keep the action under wraps,” said Jean MacDonald, another member of EcoVie. “But you know how it is in a small community. Someone went by and took photos of the camp we are setting up, and put them on FaceBook. We could not keep it quiet because so many people around here oppose the spraying.”
“Now we are getting many offers of support,” says Francine. “We are just a few people. We had hoped to wait to announce to the media until this Saturday, August 27, when the provincial Peace & Friendship Alliance network will be having its monthly meeting in Kedgwick River. The Alliance is made up of Indigenous, Acadian, and Anglophone New Brunswickers who are very opposed to the spraying. But I guess the cat is out of the bag.”
The “Happy Campers” site is located on Chemin de la Shop a Savon, just off Highway 17. Travel in White's Brook Road by the old church about 4.5 km, and then turn right when you come to a “T” in the road. A very tight code of ethics and non-violence is being enforced at the site.
Stop Spraying New Brunswick group calls for human health study, wildlife health study and immediate moratorium.

New Brunswick’s acting Chief Medical Officer (CMO) Dr. Jennifer Russell has concluded that there is no need to stop glyphosate forest spraying at this time in NB. After review of the Glyphosate report released by the Chief Medical Officer of New Brunswick on July 26, 2016, Stop Spraying New Brunswick group calls for an immediate moratorium on forest spraying and the start of human and wildlife health studies.

“What I saw was a report that acknowledged that the use of Glyphosate is contentious,” says Peter Gilbert, co-organizer of Stop Spraying New Brunswick. ”Some say it’s okay and some say it’s not. There are provinces, states, countries and scientific authorities on both sides of this debate. That in itself is enough reason to press pause on the use of this controversial herbicide.“

“The extent of forest spraying in this province and the dramatic drop in the deer population are two compelling reasons to launch a major health study immediately in NB including humans and large forest animals”, says Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, co-organizer of stop Spraying New Brunswick.

New Brunswick is seeing an increase in forest spraying as a result of the 2014 Forest Management Strategy, which allows for more Crown forest clearcuts than before with resulting plantations that are managed by herbicide spraying. 40% of cut forest was sprayed in 2014, a much higher percentage than any other province in Canada.

“Canadian Environmental Protection Law recognizes that the protection of the environment is essential to the well-being of Canadians,” says Francine Levesque from Écovie, Kedgwick River. “It includes a precautionary principle that says that "lack of full scientific certainty shall not be used as a reason for postponing cost-effective measures to prevent environmental degradation" and "The application of this principle is a legitimate and distinct decision-making approach within risk management". This principle should be used in NB at this moment with glyphosate since we have the second-highest cancer rate In Canada (Statistics 2015).” 

Clearly something is wrong as we are witnessing with large mammals (other than humans) living in our forests. One only has to look at the significant drop and change in distribution of New Brunswick’s deer population. Our deer population is now a quarter of what it was 30 years ago (New Brunswick’s deer population has plummeted from 270,000 to 74,000 over the past 3 decades). Data comparing New Brunswick, Maine and Québec show that the deer harvest numbers in New Brunswick have decreased to 15% of 1985 LEVELS, whereas numbers are up 300% in Québec and have remained stable in Maine. Québec has had a ban on forest spraying since 2001. 

It should be noted that it has been reported that deer will not eat sprayed vegetation and that they will migrate to find food in unsprayed areas, but their supply of food is diminishing due to increased clearcuts and herbicide spraying. Moose however, will eat sprayed vegetation so the health of these large mammals should be studied. If there is no risk this needs to be proven and not assumed. A study would help answer several important questions since a large percentage of our population hunts moose and fishes for food. Is their meat and organ tissue tested for the presence of this chemical? 

“New Brunswick’s wildlife such as deer and moose are our canaries in the coal mine with respect to forest spraying," says Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D'Arcy. “Stop Spraying New Brunswick (SSNB) is asking for an immediate health study to be launched on humans and large mammals in New Brunswick as well as an immediate moratorium or outright ban on forest spraying. Our acting CMO should be applying the precautionary principle and not use the New Brunswick rural population as guinea pigs."

FREDERICTON — Tracy Glynn, the forest program director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, issued the following statement about the report released today by the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health (OCMOH) on glyphosate.

The report confirms what we have long feared — that the forest industry uses more glyphosate in NB operations than any other province in Canada.

The report found that 40% of the forest land cut in NB in 2014 was sprayed with glyphosate compared to 28% in Ontario, 21% in Alberta, 18% in Manitoba and only 11% in Nova Scotia.

While 205,859 hectares were cut in Québec in the same year, no forest lands there were sprayed with glyphosate.

The analysis puts the key public policy question squarely back into the government’s hands. Namely, why, of all places in Canada, is NB spending so much taxpayer money on our companies’ spray programs when other jurisdictions, like Vermont and Québec, get on fine without it.

The report did discuss the human health risk associated with glyphosate. While it recognizes that there are many outstanding questions that need to be examined by Health Canada and its Pesticide Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) in its long overdue re-evaluation of the chemical, the report says human health risks can be reduced if its label restrictions are properly followed.

The OCMOH points out that public health agencies in Canada and elsewhere have adopted a “wait and see” approach. The PMRA is currently reassessing glyphosate. The review of glyphosate, not expected until 2017, was delayed due to what the OCMOH called “rapidly-evolving new information.”

Beyond the scope of the OCMOH’s report are other concerns related to glyphosate use in forestry that weigh heavily on the minds of New Brunswickers. These concerns need to be addressed by our provincial government and include the environmental impacts of the use of glyphosate on deer, moose and aquatic species, and on water quality.

The report points out the uncertainty surrounding glyphosate use world-wide. Some European countries, like France, Sweden, Italy and the Netherlands, are arguing for a complete ban of its use in both agriculture and forestry. We believe that this supports our recommendation that a prudent action would be to stop using it in forestry operations, especially since more responsible alternatives are available and their use, in fact, would create more jobs.

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Additional Information

  • NB farmers use less glyphosate than those in other provinces, primarily due to the fact that NB grows fewer bushels of genetically modified corn and soybeans.
  • Québec banned herbicide use in its forests in 2001 due to public concern over human health impacts of spraying. Vermont, which has a similar forest type to New Brunswick, also stopped using herbicides in their forests, almost two decades ago, in 1997.
  • NB’s Auditor General recommended in her 2015 report that public forests should be managed for economic, environmental and social values, and highlighted that the province has lost money from the management of public forests for at least the last five years.
  • To see where NB forest will be sprayed this summer, click here.

report Crop

Canadian Groups Call on Federal Government to Reject Pipelines,

As New U.S.Led Campaign Calls for National Tar Sands Dilbit Tanker Ban

July 26, 2016, Saint John—A new report released today by the US – based Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), in partnership with the Conservation Council of New Brunswick and other numerous Canadian and U.S. groups, shows the proposed Energy East pipeline would drive a 300 to 500 per cent increase in crude tanker traffic down the Atlantic coast from Saint John, New Brunswick to the U.S. Gulf Coast— industry’s preferred refinery market for processing tar sands bitumen. The report, “Tar Sands in the Atlantic: TransCanada’s Proposed Energy East Pipeline,” shows the addition of almost 300 supertankers would pose a massive threat—in the form of deafening ocean noise, heightened risks of major oil spills, and the introduction of invasive species—to marine mammals like the endangered North Atlantic right whale, the Bay of Fundy’s lucrative lobster fishery, and other iconic regions like the Florida Keys.

“The Energy East pipeline and tanker proposal is too risky for our communities, water and wildlife,” said Keith Brooks, Campaigns Director at Environmental Defence. “The federal government says tar sands oil doesn’t belong in the Great Bear Rainforest or the North Coast of BC. The boreal forest of eastern Canada and places like the Bay of Fundy on the Atlantic coast are no different.”

NRDC, which was instrumental in the campaign to stop the Keystone XL pipeline, also announced today a new campaign calling for a national moratorium on tankers carrying tar sands dilbit in U.S waters, which would apply to the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. In just a week, a petition to the White House has garnered more than 80,000 signatories.

“Energy East represents a set of extraordinary threats to the U.S. East Coast,” said Anthony Swift, Director of NRDC’s Canada Project. “It would be irresponsible for regulators to turn a blind eye to what could happen with Energy East’s oil once it’s loaded onto tankers bound for the Gulf Coast.”

“In the face of these threats—which we know from the National Academy of Sciences represent nearly impossible challenges for industry and spill responders to address—we believe there’s a pressing need for a moratorium on tar sands tankers and barges in U.S. waters,” added Swift.

In the U.S., the Coast Guard and the Environmental Protection Agency have the authority to approve or reject vessel and facility spill response plans. According to the NRDC, given a lack of technology designed for confronting submerged and sunken oil, no response plan can adequately clean up diluted bitumen. Unlike conventional crude, large portions of diluted bitumen can be expected to sink if

spilled in water, according to a 2016 study by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). The NAS also found that current regulations and spill response techniques are incapable of managing the unique behavior and higher risks of tar sands diluted bitumen spill in water.

“To be at all credible, the National Energy Board must give the NAS study a central role in its review of Energy East,” said Matt Abbott of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, who added the NEB has denied the opportunity for consultation on the tanker issue in Nova Scotia, which, along with New Brunswick, would be most directly impacted by tar sands tanker traffic.

Meanwhile, in British Columbia the NEB refused to consider the same NAS study in its Kinder Morgan pipeline analysis.

“We already have tankers loaded with diluted bitumen plying the West Coast, threatening communities on both sides of the border,” said Will Horter, strategy director at Dogwood Initiative. “Now Kinder Morgan is pushing ahead with plans for a seven-fold expansion in tanker traffic, with no ability to clean up submerged oil.” Today also marks the six-year anniversary of the Kalamazoo, Michigan spill, where

4.2 million litres of tar sands dilbit crude spilled into the river after a rupture in the Enbridge pipeline. The five year spill response effort cost more than $1 billion USD and bitumen residues remain in place on the river bottom despite extensive dredging.

Partners of NRDC’s report — which is available online here —include 350.org, 350Maine, 350 Massachusetts for a Better Future, Conservation Council of New Brunswick, Ecology Action Centre, Environmental Defence, Environment Maine, Equiterre, Friends of the Earth, Greenpeace, Natural Resources Council of Maine, Oil Change International, and Sierra Club.

Read the complete Tanker report, here.

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To learn more about an alternative vision for New Brunswick that focuses on renewable energy investments as apposed to the  Energy East pipeline, check out the Conservation Council’s Bold, Made-in-New Brunswick Plan to Address Climate Change.

For more on the Energy East Pipeline, check out:

For more information on the , please contact:

  • Anthony Swift, Canada Project Director, NRDC, 202-513-6276
  • Tim Ehlich, Communications Manager, Environmental Defence, 647-468-3641
  • Matthew Abbott, Director of Marine Conservation, CCNB, 506-321-0429
  • Will Horter, Strategy Director, Dogwood Initiative, 250-418-1672
  • Stephen Thomas, Energy Campaign Coordinator, Ecology Action Centre, 902-4417136

 

For more information on the , please contact:

  • Anthony Swift, Canada Project Director, NRDC, 202-513-6276
  • Tim Ehlich, Communications Manager, Environmental Defence, 647-468-3641
  • Matthew Abbott, Director of Marine Conservation, Conservation Council of New Brunswick, 506-321-0429
  • Will Horter, Strategy Director, Dogwood Initiative, 250-418-1672
  • Stephen Thomas, Energy Campaign Coordinator, Ecology Action Centre, 902-4417136
Opponents push alternative to Mt. Carleton gas bar and snowmobile trail on mountain


Fredericton - A perfectly good alternative to developments being proposed for within Mt. Carleton Park exists outside the wilderness park, say people dead-set against an enlarged snowmobile circuit and gas bar being promoted by the Province.

Jean Louis Deveau is spokesman for a group of citizens concerned about the expanding presence of snow machines in the Park and their impact on wildlife. The group is advancing alternative locations to keep the park free of new infrastructure and what they view as incompatible use by motorized vehicles in New Brunswick’s only designated wilderness park. 

Governor's Lodge at Popple Depot, located east of the park, is one such alternative and is at the centre of a proposed snowmobile ‘hub.’ “From my understanding, Governor’s Lodge has the space for sled gatherings and it also sells gas,” Deveau, a former manager at Mt. Carleton said Tuesday.

“Why build new infrastructure to enable sleds to gas up in a wilderness park when there are already private establishments in the area offering the services they want?” Deveau asks. Taxpayers would pay for the gas dispensary being proposed for the park, whereas the gas dispensary at Popple Depot was paid for by the private sector.

“By putting a new gas bar in the park, the Province may well disadvantage or even handicap Governor’s Lodge and other privately owned gas distributors in the area. Won’t that defeat the Province’s goals of trying to create new jobs with this project?” Deveau said.

Park advocates including Deveau have launched a legal challenge to force the government to abandon the scheme to infringe on the Park, and to follow its own legislation. A crowdfunding campaign on gofundme.com was launched in June to help cover legal fees. The court is scheduled to hear the case on September 2nd in Woodstock.

The Parks Act (2014) stipulates a management plan based on a zoning system must be completed prior to any development in Provincial Parks. Mt. Carleton has been zoned but doesn’t have a management plan.



Press Release

A Bold, Made-in-New Brunswick Plan to Address Climate Change

Conservation Council of New Brunswick releases policy options to spur climate change conversation

July 13, 2016

Fredericton, N.B. – A new report from the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, released today, offers provincial politicians, environmental policy makers, and citizens a bold vision for New Brunswick. The three-part plan covers electricity, provincial investments, and government policies required to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while keeping bills low and creating jobs for New Brunswickers.

New Brunswick’s greenhouse gas emissions mostly come from using fossil fuel energy: coal, oil and natural gas to make electricity to heat and cool our homes, and power our appliances and industry, as well as gasoline and diesel to run our vehicles and trucks to move people and goods.

The Conservation Council’s“Climate Action Plan for NewBrunswick”proposes to reduce these emissions through investments to retrofit our buildings, starting with social and low-income housing; expanding efforts to install renewable energy like solar and wind; and accelerating installation of the Energy Internet (Smart Grid telecommunications) to manage a more distributed electricity load. These investments would help NB Power phase coal out of electricity production over the next 15 years. The Conservation Council’s plan also proposes creating incentives to help New Brunswickers buy electric and energy efficient vehicles and trucks as Ontario and Quebec have done, and modernizing industry and manufacturing to cut waste and pollution. 

Blue-Green Canada, an alliance of labour and environmental groups calculates that for every $1 million invested in the fossil fuel sector two jobs are created, while 15 jobs are created for the same amount in the clean energy sector.  Using those figures, New Brunswick could create up to 7,500 jobs a year by investing its climate action dollars in clean energy and energy efficiency retrofits which, in turn, would keep energy bills low for New Brunswickers.

QUOTES: 

“There is strong scientific consensus that the climate is becoming unbalanced mostly because of human activity (95% - 100% certainty).” – Dr. Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Policy.

“Post-tropical storm Arthur opened New Brunswickers’ eyes to the reality of climate change. We now know and accept that climate change is a reality. The Conservation Council wants to start a serious conversation about adapting to, and mitigating, the damage to our communities as a result of a rapidly changing climate.” – Dr. Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Policy.

“We need a comprehensive climate action plan that helps New Brunswick do its fair share so others will too. We need to work together because we can’t protect the people and communities we care about from extreme changes to the climate without partnering to drastically cut greenhouse gas pollution.”  - Dr. Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Policy.

“New Brunswick needs to implement policies and programs that are fair and cut waste by making polluters use clean energy and practice more sustainable agriculture and forestry.” – Dr. Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Policy.

“If we act together, we can limit the risks to our health and communities from a more extreme climate.” – Dr. Louise Comeau, Director of Climate Change and Energy Policy.

 Key Facts:

       New Brunswick is the second most electricity-dependent economy in Canada behind Québec. As a regional energy hub, New Brunswick is well positioned to become a clean energy leader by investing heavily in NB Power’s Smart Grid technology to give the electricity system the capacity it needs to significantly increase the supply of renewable energy, phase out coal-fired generating stations, and provide load balancing services to Nova Scotia, PEI, and New England.

       Global investments in clean energy are increasing, spurring increased employment in the sector while the costs of clean energy have decreased significantly. Canada hasn’t kept pace, investing only $4 billion CND in 2015 while global investments in clean energy reached $325 billion USD, according to Clean Energy Canada’s Tracking the Energy Revolution 2016 report. 

       In 2015, the Atlantic Premiers and New England Governors agreed to cut greenhouse gas emissions 35% to 45% below 1990 levels by 2030. New Brunswick’s contribution to meeting that goal is to eliminate 6.5 million tonnes from our carbon budget. Almost 40% of those reductions can be achieved by phasing out coal to generate electricity, as Ontario has already done and Alberta will do by 2030.

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick (conservationcouncil.ca) has been at the forefront of environmental protection in New Brunswick since 1969. We are a non-profit organization that creates awareness of environmental problems and advances practical solutions through research, education and interventions.

 
Contact: Mike Girard

Office: 506-458-8747 

E-mail: mike.girard@conservationcouncil.ca

Plants and Animals Take New Brunswick Government To Court

Fredericton - When push comes to shove, as it has in the case of pending developments in New Brunswick’s only wilderness park, it’s always good to have allies with deep pockets.

Such allies are being courted by concerned citizens who are taking the Province of New Brunswick to court over its management of Mount Carleton Wilderness Park near Nictau, N.B. 

The proposal entails extending a network of snowmobile trails to the summit, park electrification and a gas bar, things the group opposing the project believes will damage the natural area and its wildlife.

“We’ve turned to Go Fund Me, a crowd-source fundraising website, to gather the $15,000 needed to stop this development in court,” said Jean Louis Deveau, former park manager at Mount Carleton. 

“The plants and animals cannot speak for themselves,” Deveau said. “With everything around the Park being clear cut, we cannot stand by and let this sanctuary be destroyed. We've raised over $13,000 in the past week so this clearly resonates with people.” 

Grand Chief Ron Tremblay of the Traditional Maliseet Government has reached out to media outlets to cover this story. In an interview on CBC radio this week he argued strenuously that snowmobiles should not be allowed to expand their range in the park.

“The commodification of this wild place through snowmobile tourism is not only incompatible with our values, tradition, and culture but will inevitably lead to conflicts between those who, like the Gallant Government, see the park as a place of business and those who, like us, see it as sacred,” said Tremblay. 

A provincial court justice will hear arguments at the end of June in Moncton. Donors are urged to go to GoFundMe.com and search for ‘Plants & Animals Take on NB Gov’t’ to contribute towards the group's court expenses.




La version française suit la version anglaise.


Funding appeal by the Plants, Swimmers, Flyers, Crawlers, and Four-legged creatures of Mount Carleton Provincial Park



We are the plants, swimmers, flyers, crawlers, and four-legged creatures of the park, whose ancestors have lived in this part of Wolastokuk (Maliseet homeland) for thousands of years.  Our wish for now is to have a New Brunswick court of law designate this part of Wolastokuk—our homeland—as our sanctuary.

Members of our extended families, the Kci-Putuwosultihtit Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet Grand Council), will bring our case before the court later this month. The Wolastoqewiyik (Maliseet people) have been, and always will be, our protectors. The Grand Chief of the Kci-Putuwosultihtit Wolastoqiyik, Ron Tremblay, will be joined by Jean Louis Deveau, a co-founder of the Friends of Mount Carleton and former manager of the park, who will intervene on our behalf. Our lawyer is Gordon Allen from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. 

The struggle to preserve our home for All Our Relations by challenging in court the decision to turn our home into a snowmobile hub will take thousands of dollars of the plastic money used by two-legged creatures. The economy of the land, air, and water where we live, however, is based not on plastic money, but on sunlight. So, we don’t have plastic money used by two-leggeds and will need the help of friends like you to win this court challenge.

So, this a special appeal to those of you compassionate two-legged creatures, who understand that we are all interconnected in the circle of life and who are sympathetic to preserving our way of life, here and/or elsewhere in Wolastokuk homeland, to donate your kind of money to help pay for our legal fees in court.

Please make your donations, large or small, online via our Go Fund Me page or offline to the Maliseet Grand Council, c/o Alma Brooks, 50 Maliseet Drive, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3A 2V9. 

• • •

Demande de fonds par les plantes, les créatures aquatiques, ailées, rampantes, et les créatures à quatre pattes du Parc provincial Mont-Carleton




Nous sommes les plantes, les créatures aquatiques, ailées, rampantes ainsi que les créatures à quatre pattes vivant dans ce parc et dont les ancêtres ont vécu dans cette partie du territoire Wolastokuk (malécite) pendant des milliers d’années. Ce que nous voulons, aujourd’hui, c’est qu’un tribunal du Nouveau-Brunswick désigne cette partie de Wolastokuk – notre territoire - comme notre sanctuaire. 




Des membres de nos familles élargies, le Kci-Putuwosultihtit Wolastoqiyik (Grand Conseil malécite),  soumettront notre cause au tribunal plus tard ce mois-ci. De tout temps, les Wolastoqewiyik (le peuple malécite) ont été nos protecteurs et ils le seront toujours. Le grand chef du Kci-Putuwosultihtit Wolastoqiyik, Ron Tremblay, accompagné de Jean Louis Deveau, un co-fondateur des Amis du mont Carleton et ancien directeur du parc, interviendra en notre nom. Notre avocat est Gordon Allen de Dartmouth en Nouvelle-Écosse. 




Notre lutte pour préserver notre territoire pour toutes nos relations en contestant en cour la décision de transformer nos terres en un centre d’entretien centralisé pour motoneiges va coûter des milliers de dollars de la monnaie qu’utilisent les humains. L’économie de la terre, de l’air et de l’eau où nous habitons ne reposant pas sur le système monétaire des humains mais plutôt sur la lumière du soleil, nous ne disposons pas d’argent. 




C’est pourquoi nous avons besoin de l’aide d’amis comme vous pour gagner cette bataille juridique. Nous vous lançons donc un appel à vous, créatures à deux pattes compatissantes, qui comprenez que nous sommes tous étroitement reliés dans le cercle de la vie et qui êtes favorables à la préservation de notre mode de vie ici ou ailleurs sur le territoire Wolastokuk, pour que vous nous aidiez, par vos dons, à défrayer nos frais juridiques.  




Vos dons, peu importe le montant, peuvent être faits en ligne sur notre page Go Fund Me ou envoyés par la poste à Grand Conseil Malécite, a/s Alma Brooks, 50, promenade Maliseet, Fredericton, Nouveau-Brunswick, E3A 2V9.


Be Happy for Sparrows

Workshop and Field Trip with Roger Leblanc

Saturday June 11, 2016




It’s a fact that when you are starting out in birding there are some groups of birds that are harder than others to wrap you mind or binoculars around. Some beginners don’t even want to talk about flycatchers or gulls. And it’s true that some birds could drive you to get interested in plants! But there is a much easier group of birds that still gives people a lot of problems. The sparrows or LBJs (for “little brown jobs”) are birds that are relatively easy to find, don’t tend to hide that much, show fairly good field marks, and have recognizable songs. But still, identifying them will give most people a hard time at first. Why? Well as the LBJ nickname suggests they don’t have a lot of colors, they are relatively close to each other in size and there are a fair number of species to pick from.




But don’t despair -- help is on the way. Nature Moncton is offering a hands-on workshop on sparrows. Starting with a short one-hour indoor refresher on the sparrows of NB we will then head outdoors to the Riverview Marsh where we will concentrate on sparrows to try to put in practice what you have learned inside. The objective will be to find in the field as many as we can of the 7 or 8 species that can be found fairly easily in the region at this time of the year. Our own Roger Leblanc will lead this workshop / outing and will share with us the tricks of the trade that he has honed over the years for putting names on the pesky LBJ’S. Things like song, habitat, behavior and head pattern will be pointed out and studied in the hope that the LBJs will become ETCs (easy to call).




And in addition to sparrows, there are always many more other birds, including lots of waterfowl, on the marsh – so we may be surprised by other interesting species!




Saturday June 11, 8:00 to 9:00 (workshop); 9:30 to 12:00 (field)




**Workshop will be held in Community room at the Riverview Sobey’s, 1160 Findlay Blvd., Riverview




Registration with Louise Nichols at nicholsl@eastlink.ca. 

Phone: 939-9054.

Cost of workshop/field trip is $8 payable at the door . All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not.




 
Bio Banner Fra

Le mardi 18 mai 2016

(Fredericton, N.-B.) Afin de souligner le 22 mai, qui a été désigné la Journée internationale de la biodiversité par les Nations Unies, des groupes au Nouveau-Brunswick désirent souligner qu’ils placent une valeur importante sur la beauté de la nature et des espaces sauvages avec le lancement d’un nouveau logo.  Ce logo, avec l’inscription « Vivre la Nature : Ensemble pour la biodiversité du Nouveau-Brunswick », aidera à intégrer la biodiversité dans la province, ce qui est précisément le thème présenté cette année pour cette journée.

Le logo a été conçu afin de créer une sensibilisation à l’importance de la diversité de la vie sauvage au Nouveau-Brunswick et de renforcer l’intérêt de la population dans la préservation.  Ce logo peut être utilisé par les groupes et les individus qui veulent célébrer la biodiversité et démontrer leur esprit de collaboration pour faire progresser la conservation et la surveillance.  Ce logo a été créé par les groupes impliqués dans le Collectif sur la biodiversité du Nouveau-Brunswick.

« Il existe plusieurs différents groupes dans la province qui travaillent pour la préservation de la diversité de la vie que ce soit par la conservation des habitats, la présentation de plaidoyers, la préparation de recherches, la surveillance, l’éducation ou par d’autres moyens, » rappelle Jessica Bradford de la Fondation pour la protection des sites naturels du Nouveau-Brunswick.  « Nous voulons attirer l’attention vers ces efforts, en plus de les relier et démontrer notre solidarité à poursuivre le but commun de garantir la survie d’une vaste gamme de plantes et d’animaux dans un avenir durable.  Nous encourageons tous les groupes ayant des projets concernant la biodiversité à utiliser ce logo dans leur matériel de communication et leurs ressources. »

Plusieurs groupes de la province montrent déjà leur appui à cette initiative en affichant ce logo sur leur site Web, en l’insérant dans leurs publications relatives à la biodiversité, et en le faisant connaitre sur les médias sociaux avec des messages d’information sur la biodiversité et sur notre riche héritage naturel.

Par ailleurs, les Parcs provinciaux du Nouveau-Brunswick vont incorporer ce logo dans leur Livre vert, une ressource pour l’éducation en plein air.

« Certes, le concept de biodiversité est large et peut être difficile à transmettre aux gens, » constate Vanessa Roy-McDougall, de Nature NB.  « La variété dans la nature est un aspect absolument essentiel pour que les environnements soient sains et les personnes en santé, il est donc important que les divers groupes qui travaillent pour faire progresser la biodiversité travaillent ensemble et transmettent un message cohérent. »

Exemples de groupes qui utilisent le logo :
  • Fondation pour la protection des sites naturels du Nouveau-Brunswick présente le logo dans le défilement des photos sur la bannière principale de leur page Web. On l’utilise aussi au pied de chaque page.
  • Nature NB a préparé une nouvelle section sur leur site Web consacrée à la biodiversité avec le logo.
  • Le Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick l’utilise dans les médias sociaux et autre documentation.
  • Réserve de biosphère de Fundy a ajouté le logo sur leur site Web.
  • Meduxnekeag River Association a ajouté le logo sur leur site Web.
  • Alliance du bassin versant Petitcodiac a publié le logo sur son site Web, avec un blogue et un article de promotion sur Facebook.
  • Vision H2O a ajouté le logo sur les affiches des sentiers à l’Ecoparc Cormier-Village et ils vont promouvoir le logo au cours de leurs activités estivales.
  • Société d’aménagement de la rivière Madawaska et du lac Témiscouata inc. a inséré le logo sur leur site Web.
  • L’Association des pêcheurs récréatifs du sud-est inc. présente le logo au pied de la page d’accueil de leur site Web.
  • Le Centre Falls Brook a ajouté le logo aux sections biodiversité et éducation de leur site Web et ils vont écrire un blogue sur l’importance de la biodiversité pour l’agriculture.
De plus, pour célébrer la Journée internationale pour la biodiversité et l’initiative de ce collectif, la Fondation pour la protection des sites naturels du Nouveau-Brunswick, Nature N-B et le Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick organisent un évènement en collaboration avec un photographe primé et photojournaliste de la nature Nick Hawkins et avec un herpétologiste et associé de recherche au Musée du Nouveau-Brunswick, Greg Jongsma, le mercredi 25 mai à Fredericton.

« Nous avons beaucoup de chance de pouvoir voir des baleines sauter dans la baie de Fundy et de voir des pygargues survoler nos rivières.  Nous pouvons marcher sous d’anciens pins et explorer des terres humides remplies de faune, d’une variété de petites libellules aux orignaux géants, » fait remarquer Nadine Ives du Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick.  « La Journée internationale pour la biodiversité nous donne l’occasion de réfléchir et de célébrer la nature. »
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À propos de la biodiversité : diversité biologique ou en bref biodiversité, se réfère à la variété de toutes les formes de vie, ainsi qu’aux écosystèmes et aux processus naturels qui les supportent.  La province du Nouveau-Brunswick a préparé une stratégie provinciale qui se concentre sur la conservation de la biodiversité et sur l’utilisation de ressources biologiques d’une manière durable.  La stratégie provinciale, qui s’insère dans la Stratégie canadienne de la biodiversité, a été mise en place pour appuyer les obligations du Canada envers la Convention des Nations Unies sur la diversité biologique, qui contient un plan stratégique pour la biodiversité, y inclus les cibles Aichi pour la biodiversité pour la période 2011-2020.

À propos du Collectif pour la biodiversité du Nouveau-Brunswick : Le Collectif pour la biodiversité au Nouveau-Brunswick est un effort conjoint pour s’occuper de la protection de la biodiversité et des espèces en péril.  Le but du collectif est de travailler en collaboration pour améliorer la surveillance des activités sur place et pour fournir une approche complète pour la protection de la biodiversité dans la province.  Les agences impliquées sont variées ; le collectif réunit des citoyens des groupes environnementaux et de conservation, des agences des gouvernements fédéral, de la province et des municipalités, des chercheurs et des professeurs, des planificateurs des régions rurales et municipales, et des entreprises afin qu’ils travaillent tous dans un esprit de coopération mutuelle.

Personnes ressources pour les médias :
·         Mary Ann Coleman, Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick, 506-433-6101, maryann.coleman@nben.ca
·         Raissa Marks, Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick, 506-855-4144, raissa.marks@nben.ca 

Entrevues bilingues :
·         Vanessa Roy-McDougall, Nature NB, 506-459-4209, executive.director@naturenb.ca
·         Nadine Ives, Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick, 506-458-8747,nadine@conservationcouncil.ca
·         Megan de Graaf, Réserve de biosphère Fundy, 506-459-4209,executive.director@fundy-biosphere.ca
·         Christine McLaughlan, Alliance du bassin versant Petitcodiac, 506-384-3369, executivedirector@petitcodiacwatershed.org
·         Johanne Paquette, Vision H2O, 506-577-2071, info@visionh2o.com
·         Joanie Dubé, Société d’aménagement de la rivière Madawaska et du lac Témiscouata inc., 506-739-1992, jdube_sarmlt@nb.aibn.com
·         Darlene Elward, Association des pêcheurs récréatifs du sud-est inc., 506-576-2118, aprse@nb.aibn.com 

Entrevues en anglais :
·         Jessica Bradford, Fondation pour la protection des sites naturels du Nouveau-Brunswick, 506-457-2398, communications@ntnb.org
·         Simon Mitchell, Meduxnekeag River Association, 506-238-4429, simon@meduxnekeag.org
·         Michelle Lavery, Falls Brook Centre,506-454-5480, media@fallsbrookcentre.ca
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (French follows)

Total signatures presented: 12,686!
 
MEDIA RELEASE

May 17, 2015

11,000 Signature Petition Presentation To Stop Herbicide Spraying in New Brunswick Public Forests and NB Power right-of-ways

FREDERICTON - On Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 11,868 signatures will be presented to MLAs for tabling at the Provincial Legislature to stop spraying of public forests and NB Power right of ways in New Brunswick. This second petition represents communities from every part of the province including francophone, anglophone and Indigenous communities. The petition drive will continue with future presentations planned later this year. 

A delegation of community organizers representing “Stop Spraying in New Brunswick” (SSNB) will be travelling to Fredericton from communities across New Brunswick to present a petition with (NUMBER) signatures to provincial politicians:

Petition Presentation:  Stop The Spraying of Glyphosate Herbicides
Wednesday, May 18, 2016
12:00noon - 1:00pm
In front of the Provincial Legislature Buildings
706 Queen Street
Fredericton, New Brunswick

The Stop Spraying NB movement has been growing rapidly since the recent hunting season found that there are almost no deer in our public forests. A catastrophic deer collapse was underway, with the deer population now one-quarter what it was 30 years ago.  A petition campaign which was started on December 16, 2015 with an initial submission of almost 1200 signatures from Kedgwick.

Two MLAs, David Coon (Fredericton South) and Gilles Lepage (Restigouche West) will be meeting SSNB representatives to accept and table the petition at the Legislature. They have both stated that they will sign the petition as well.

Recent data from Maine Inland F&W, Quebec Chasse et peche, NSDNR and NBDNR shows that hunting numbers in NB are now 15% of what they were in 1985, whereas in Quebec the numbers have increased threefold and in Maine they have stayed relatively stable over the same period of time. The combination of increased clearcutting and glyphosate spraying of monoculture softwood plantations are eliminating a very large amount of deer food, removing enough browse to feed 32,000 deer each and every year.  People who live near or in the woods have noticed the effects on the deer population in New Brunswick themselves.
 
David Ward, an avid outdoorsman and writer for the on-line magazine Wilderness Obsession has noticed the effects on the deer population in NB and draws a correlation with the fate of monarch butterflies : “It is time that we, as caring citizens of New Brunswick, recognize the monarch butterfly as the proverbial “canary in the coal-mine” that it truly is!  Just as using glyphosate to remove milkweed has destroyed an entire population of butterfly, removing hardwoods and shrubs from our forests in favour of new growth monocultures is having a devastating effect on Whitetail Deer and a number of other species.  We need to stand up and recognize how important this is, before it’s too late.”

Wildlife guide Leo Goguen from Rogersville is out in the woods all the time and says,  "Our livelihood depends on hunting wildlife and fowl. Irving not only poisoned the meat we eat but destroyed multiple game habitat that this game depends on to reproduce and strive. We are losing revenue on recreational activities and our families are being robbed of healthy food."

“The spraying of glyphosate converts our mixed Acadian Forests into boreal forests, consisting of conifers only. “ says André Arpin, retired canoe-outfitter from Kedgwick, “This kind of vegetation is more at risk of forest fires like we saw latety in Fort McMurray. With climate change, If we favour only one monoculture and if our new climate doesn't choose conifers, the risk of ruining our provincial economy is greater."

Charles Theriault lives in Kedgwick, one area of the many affected by glyphosate spraying. Charles is connected to many New Brunswickers all over and says, “If government does not address these petitioners concern, they can expect a ramping up of upheaval in this province.”

The acting Chief Medical Officer of New Brunswick, Dr. Jennifer Russell has been contacted by various groups including Stop Spraying NB on the status of the glyphosate report which was started by Dr. Eilish Cleary before she was terminated in the Fall of 2015. New Brunswickers deserve to know.


 Please arrange to meet members of Stop Spraying New Brunswick and other New Brunswickers who are alarmed about the continued use of these sprays outside the legislature buildings on Wednesday May 18, 2016 at noon. All political leaders and MLA's are invited to attend.


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MEDIA CONTACTS:
Peter Gilbert, Smithfield: (506)261-1840
Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, Fredericton: (506)292-7503
André Arpin, Kedgwick : (506)284-2769/(506)284- 0054



PETITION TO THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF NEW BRUNSWICK
TO THE HONOURABLE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF NEW BRUNSWICK, ASSEMBLED:
 
Whereas approximately 13,000 ha of New Brunswick Crown forest are sprayed every year with herbicides to kill hardwoods and plants that compete with seedlings in plantations;



Whereas spraying herbicides to kill broad leaf trees and shrubs in young conifer plantations destroys the food source and habitats of forest wildlife;



Whereas glyphosates, the herbicide used in New Brunswick Crown forest silviculture, has been labelled a probable human carcinogen by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer in 2015;



Whereas the province of Quebec, with approximately 90 per cent of its forested land under public ownership, banned herbicide spraying of its public forest in 2001 in light of public health concerns;



Whereas replacing the use of herbicides in Crown forest with thinning crews of people working in the woods
- as Quebec has done since 2001 - would ensure more jobs from our forest resource;


Whereas the Auditor General of New Brunswick attributed the annual forest deficit ($7-$10 million for each of the last five years) to the costly silviculture program in a report tabled to the N.B. Legislature in June 2015.  At a cost of about $1,000/hectare, herbicide spraying contributes to N.B.'s annual forest deficit and prevents natural forest regeneration;
 
Whereas there is a widespread public opposition to the spraying of the forest in New Brunswick.  Three petitions against spraying the forest have been tabled in the New Brunswick Legislature in just over ten years.
 
The petition of the undersigned requests that NB MLAs support a ban on the spraying of glyphosates in Crown forest management in New Brunswick.


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POUR DIFFUSION IMMÉDIATE

 
COMMUNIQUÉ DE PRESSE

 
17 mai 2016

Présentation de plus de 11000 signatures de Pétition de Stop Spraying NB/ Arrêtons l’arrosage NB pour l’arrêt de l'arrosage d'herbicides sur les forêts publiques du Nouveau-Brunswick ainsi que sur les droits de passage d’ Énergie NB.

FREDERICTON - Le mercredi 18 mai 2016, 11856 signatures seront présentées aux députés pour le dépôt à l'Assemblée législative provinciale pour arrêter l’épandage d’herbicides sur les forêts publiques du NB et sur les droits de passage d’Energie NB. Cette deuxième pétition, provenant de toutes les régions de la province, inclue les régions francophones, anglophones et les communautés autochtones. La campagne pour ramasser des signatures de cette pétition se poursuivra avec des présentations futures prévues plus tard cette année.

Une délégation d'organisateurs communautaires représentant « Stop Spraying NB/Arrêtons l’arrosage NB », provenant de partout dans la province, se rendra à Fredericton pour présenter une pétition de 11856 signatures aux politiciens provinciaux:

Présentation de la pétition: Arrêtons l’arrosage des herbicides glyphosate
Mercredi 18 mai 2016
12:00(midi) - 13:00
Devant les bâtiments de l’Assemblée législative
706, rue Queen
Fredericton, Nouveau-Brunswick

Le mouvement Stop Spraying/Arrêtons l’arrosage NB a connu une croissance rapide depuis la dernière saison de chasse qui a démontrée qu'il n'y a presque plus de chevreuils dans nos forêts publiques. Un effondrement catastrophique du cheptel de chevreuils est en cours, la population du chevreuil étant maintenant le quart de ce qu'il était il y a 30 ans. Une campagne pour ramasser des signatures de pétition a alors débuté le 16 Décembre 2015, avec le lancement de près de 1200 signatures provenant de la communauté rurale de Kedgwick.

Deux députés, David Coon (Fredericton-Sud) et Gilles Lepage (Restigouche-Ouest) ont accepté de rencontrer des représentants de Stop Spraying/Arrêtons l’arrosage NB et de déposer cette pétition à l'Assemblée législative. Ils ont tous deux déclaré qu'ils vont également signer la pétition.

Des données récentes du Maine Inland Fisheries and Wildlife , Québec Chasse et Pêche, Ministère des ressources naturelles de la N.E. et du N.B. démontrent que le nombre de captures au Nouveau-Brunswick sont maintenant 15% de ce qu'elles étaient en 1985, alors qu'au Québec, les chiffres ont triplé et dans le Maine, ils sont restés relativement stables au cours de la même période. La combinaison de l'augmentation de la coupe à blanc et de l’arrosage de glyphosates dans les plantations de monocultures de résineux éliminent une très grande quantité de nourriture de cerfs, soit l’approvisionnement en nourriture de 32,000 chevreuils et cela, chaque année. Les gens qui vivent à proximité ou dans les bois ont, eux-mêmes, remarqué les effets sur la population du chevreuil au Nouveau-Brunswick.

David Ward, un amateur de plein air et écrivain pour le magazine en ligne Wilderness Obsession, a remarqué les effets sur la population de cerfs au Nouveau-Brunswick et en tire une corrélation avec le sort des papillons monarques: "Il est temps que nous, en tant que citoyens bienveillants du Nouveau-Brunswick , reconnaissons le papillon monarque comme le «canari dans la mine de charbon" qu'il est vraiment! Tout comme l'utilisation du glyphosate pour éliminer l'asclépiade a détruit toute une population de papillons, enlever les feuillus et les arbustes de nos forêts pour favoriser la croissance de nouvelles monocultures a un effet dévastateur sur le cerf de Virginie et un certain nombre d'autres espèces. Nous devons nous tenir debout et reconnaître à quel point cela est important, avant qu'il ne soit trop tard".

Leo Goguen, guide de la faune de Rogersville, passe une bonne partie de son temps en forêt et dit: "Notre subsistance dépend de la chasse de la faune et de la volaille. Irving a non seulement empoisonné la viande que nous mangeons, mais détruit l'habitat multiple de jeu dont ils dépendent pour se reproduire et survivre. Nous perdons les revenus sur ces activités récréatives et nos familles se font voler de la nourriture saine".

"Le glyphosate transforme nos forêts acadiennes mixtes en forêts boréales, composées uniquement de conifères.", dit André Arpin, opérateur touristique retraité de Kedgwick, "Ce type de végétation est plus à risque d'incendies de forêt, comme nous l'avons vu dernièrement à Fort McMurray. Avec les changements climatiques, si nous favorisons une seule monoculture et si notre nouveau climat ne choisit pas les conifères, le risque de ruiner l'économie provinciale est plus grande."

Charles Thériault vit à Kedgwick, une des nombreuses zones touchées par l’arrosage du glyphosate. Charles est en lien avec de nombreux Néo-Brunswickois partout dans la province et dit: "Si le gouvernement ne répond pas aux préoccupations de ces pétitionnaires, ils peuvent s’ attendre à une montée en puissance de bouleversement dans cette province."

Le médecin hygiéniste en chef par intérim du Nouveau-Brunswick, le Dr Jennifer Russell, a été contacté par divers groupes, y compris Stop Spraying/Arrêtons l’arrosage NB, sur l'état du rapport de glyphosate qui a été commencé par le Dr Eilish Cleary avant qu'elle ne soit mise à pied à l'automne 2015. Les Néo-Brunswickois ont le droit de savoir.

S'il vous plaît prendre des dispositions pour rencontrer les membres de Stop Spraying/Arrêtons l’arrosage Nouveau-Brunswick et d'autres Néo-Brunswickois qui sont énormément préoccupés par l'utilisation continue de ces herbicides, à l'extérieur des bâtiments à l’assemblée législative le mercredi 18 mai 2016 à midi. Tous les dirigeants politiques et les députés provinciaux sont invités à assister.

PERSONNES CONTACTS

Peter Gilbert, Smithfield: (506)261-1840

Dr. Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, Fredericton: (506)292-7503

André Arpin, Kedgwick : (506)284-2769/(506)284- 0054


PÉTITION À L’ASSEMBLÉE LÉGISLATIVE DU NOUVEAU-BRUNSWICK
À L’HONORABLE ASSEMBLÉE LÉGISLATIVE DU NOUVEAU-BRUNSWICK

Attendu qu’approximativement 13,000 hectares des forêts des terres de la Couronne sont arrosés chaque année avec des herbicides pour tuer le bois dur et les plantes qui rivalisent  avec les jeunes pousses des  plantations;


Attendu que l’arrosage d’herbicides pour tuer les feuillus et les arbustes dans les plantations de jeunes conifères détruit les sources de nourriture et les habitats des animaux sauvages;


Attendu que le glyphosate, l’herbicide utilisé  sur les terres de la Couronne au Nouveau-Brunswick, a été déclaré un cancérogène probable pour les humains en 2015 par le Centre international de recherche sur le cancer créé par l’Organisation mondiale de la santé;

Attendu que la province de Québec, avec approximativement 90 pour cent de ses forêts qui sont publiques, ont interdit  l’arrosage sur ses forêts publiques en 2001 à cause des préoccupations au niveau de la santé;


Attendu que remplacer l’utilisation d’herbicides sur les forêts de la Couronne par des équipes de travailleurs en forêt-tout comme l’a fait le Québec en 2001-assurerait plus d’emplois provenant de nos ressources forestières;


Attendu que la Vérificatrice générale du Nouveau-Brunswick a attribué le  déficit annuel de nos forêt ($7-$10 millions pour chacune des 5 dernières années) au coût du programme actuel de sylviculture dans un rapport remis à l’Assemblée législative du Nouveau-Brunswick en juin 2015. Au coût d’environ $1,000/hectare, l’arrosage d’herbicides contribue au déficit annuel des forêts du Nouveau-Brunswick et empêche la régénération naturelle de la forêt;


Attendu qu’il y a une vaste opposition du public à l’arrosage des forêts du Nouveau-Brunswick: trois pétitions contre l’arrosage de la forêt ont été remises à l’Assemblée législative du Nouveau-Brunswick dans les derniers 10 ans.

Les signataires de la pétition demandent  que les Membres de l’assemblée  législative du Nouveau-Brunswick supportent d’interdire l’arrosage de glyphosates dans la gestion des terres de la Couronne au Nouveau-Brunswick.
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 3, 2016

Conservation Council's ecologist set to help NB teachers who want to take their classes outside
(Fredericton) — The Conservation Council’s Learning Outside Coordinator, Nadine Ives, will join Emma McIntyre of Nature NB for an in-depth nature education training session for New Brunswick elementary teachers in Moncton this week.

CCNB-N_Ives_outdoors_with_class_(nov_2015)_.jpgThousands of teachers will participate in three different professional development days across the province on May 6 organized by the New Brunswick Teachers Association. The Elementary Council Day takes at the Bernice MacNaughton High School and Wesleyan Celebration Centre in Moncton and Ives says she is looking forward to one of her favourite days of the year.

“This will be the third time I’ve helped take our shared Great Minds Think Outside professional development training to the NBTA’s Council Day participants,” said Ives, who has a PhD in ecology and has been involved in nature education in various forms for over 20 years.

“Feedback from participants is always very positive and I expect the same creative responses from our teachers this week, “says Ives. “I have found that our NB teachers are enthusiastic leaders when it comes to building outside activities into their lesson plans. “

The Conservation Council’s Learning Outside program helps New Brunswick’s children re-connect with nature by developing creative ways to integrate nature into the teaching of all subjects through the development of outdoor learning spaces and provision of teacher training opportunities.

Great Minds Think Outside is a hands-on, curriculum-linked, outdoor professional development program that gives teachers and educators the skills, tools, and resources they need to teach their students outside in nature. Launched in September 2015 by members of the NB Sustainability Education Alliance, the training is offered in both official languages and can be tailored to teachers of all grade levels.

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More information

Photo Caption: CCNB's Nadine Ives and elementary students explore the scents of the forest. 


To learn more about the Conservation Council’s Learning Outside project, check out the website atwww.learningoutside.ca

To learn more about the Great Minds Think Outside program, see www.nben.ca/greatminds.

To learn more about the NBTA’s Elementary Council Day program, see http://www.nbta.ca/councils-online-2016/elementary/pdfs/2016_EC_program.pdf

To arrange an interview, contact: Nadine Ives, 458-8747. Email: nadine.ives@conservationcouncil.ca

 



FREDERICTON – A citizens’ group in Fredericton is asking why Mayor Brad Woodside and City Council sent a Letter of Support for the proposed TransCanada Energy East Pipeline Project to the Prime Minister of Canada, Justin Trudeau, and kept it secret from the citizens of Fredericton.

Fredericton’s drinking water would be at risk from an Energy East pipeline spill as identified in the Drinking Water Report released on April 6th. A detailed analysis of the proposed Energy East pipeline route shows that across Canada the project could lead to the contamination of crucial sources of drinking water not identified in TransCanada’s application.

“Our City Councillors have a duty of care to ask about the risks and impacts of this export tar sands pipeline proposed to cross over or beside our rivers, bays, and drinking water supplies,” says Garry Guild, a member from the Fredericton chapter of the Council of Canadians.

“We are disappointed to learn that our City Council approved and sent this Letter of Support for this very controversial issue in the absence of an open and transparent debate during a regular Council meeting in which Frederictonians are allowed to attend,” says Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, a member of the Fredericton chapter of the Council of Canadians. “This is more than just about a pipeline. It’s about public trust and the integrity of our elected officers. Decisions affecting the public being made secretly behind closed doors have no place in 2016.”

The decision also contradicts the position of the Wolastoq Grand Council which recently announced on February 8th their opposition to the Energy East pipeline. The pipeline would traverse their unceded traditional homeland through the Saint John River watershed, including the headwaters of the Nashwaak River which is north of Fredericton.

To date, the following one-sentence statement is the only response that members of the local chapter have received from the City Clerk’s Office of the City of Fredericton:

“The City of Fredericton was approached by the Canadian Chamber of Commerce for a letter of support in relation to Trans Canada’s Energy East Project; and a letter was sent by Mayor Woodside, on behalf of City Council, to the Prime Minister of Canada confirming support.” (City Clerk’s Office, e-mail received April 05, 2016)

“With impending municipal elections (Monday, May 9th), the citizens of Fredericton need to vote for a Mayor and Councillors who are both accountable and transparent. This is how they gain our trust”, says Joan Green, a member of the Fredericton chapter of the Council of Canadians.The Fredericton chapter of the Council of Canadians has launched a ‘Publicly Take Back The Letter’ campaign asking Fredericton City Council to publicly withdraw the letter before or at their Monday, April 25th meeting @ 7:30pm, the final Regular Meeting of City Council prior to the May 9th municipal election.


Select Committee engages all New Brunswickers in growing the green economy

FREDERICTON —
 Establishing a Select Committee on Climate Change is an excellent step toward engaging all New Brunswickers in the important work of growing our economy and protecting our communities from extreme weather and sea level rise.

The Legislative Assembly voted unanimously in support of a motion to establish the all-party committee on Friday, April 9. The Conservation Council applauds the members of the House and looks forward to participating in this public process.

“This is an opportunity to let all New Brunswickers get involved in the plan to move us smoothly and successfully toward a low-carbon economy,” says Executive Director Lois Corbett.

Select committees are a way for government to include all New Brunswickers in the investigation of important subjects. Select committees report to all members of the legislative assembly and typically hold public hearings where citizens, government officials and expert witnesses are invited to appear.

The motion, introduced by Environment Minister Brian Kenny, states: “The government recognizes that investing in clean technology solutions, especially in areas such as renewable energy, energy efficiency, and cleaner energy production and use, holds great promise for sustainable economic development and long-term job creation.”

It also recognizes climate change as the single most significant challenge of our generation, stating: “New Brunswick is already experiencing impacts of climate change, including sea level rise, extreme rainfall events, coastal and inland flooding, more coastal erosion, heat waves, some migration of invasive species, and diseases.”

The motion asks the Select Committee to hold public consultations and gives it the power to meet, hold hearings, and release a report whether the House is sitting or not.

While commending government for introducing the motion, Corbett urges legislators and committee members to move quickly on this important work. “The committee should focus on putting New Brunswick’s best foot forward as the federal government continues work on the national climate plan,” she says.

“As Minister Kenny says in his motion, acting on the challenge of climate change won’t just protect us from the impacts communities are already experiencing — it’s the best course of action to create jobs in our province,” Corbett concludes.

The Select Committee on Climate Change is composed of: Andrew Harvey (Lib), the Member for Carleton-Victoria; Bernard LeBlanc (Lib), the Member for Memramcook-Tantramar; Monique LeBlanc (Lib), the Member for Moncton East, John Ames (Lib), the Member for Charlotte-Campobello; Wilfred Roussel (Lib), the Member for Shippagan-Lamèque-Miscou, Jody Carr (PC), the Member for Oromocto- Lincoln, Brian Keirstead (PC), the Member for Albert; and David Coon (Green), the Member for Fredericton South.

Read the motion here.
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To arrange an interview, contact: Jon MacNeill, Communications. Officer: 458-8747; Cell: 261-1353; Email: jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca
Join Nature NB as we help researchers from across Canada in tracking changes in our Natural Environment! The PlantWatch program enables citizen scientists to get involved by recording flowering times for selected plant species and reporting these dates to researchers, who work to identify ecological changes that may be affecting our environment. No experience needed!
For more information on how to participate, visit our website:


Joignez Nature NB à aider les chercheurs de partout au Canada à suivre les changements dans notre environnement naturel. Le programme AttentionFlore permet à des citoyens scientifiques de participer et d’agir en enregistrant la période de floraison d’espèces de plantes sélectionnées, et en communiquant ces dates aux scientifiques. Aucune experience nécéssaire!
Pour plus d'information visitez notre site web.
The 2016 Festival of Nature Schedule is now available. Discover Restigouche county and surrounding areas the weekend of May 27-29th 2016.

L'horaire du Festival de la Nature 2016 est maintenant disponible. Découvrez comté de Restigouche et ses environs le week-end du 27-29 mai 2016

Schedule/horaire: http://www.naturenb.ca/about-us/2016-festival-of-nature/
Register/inscription: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/2016-festival-of-nature-festiva…
“Strengthen, not weaken, the protection of our rivers, bays and drinking water”, says New Brunswick groups questioning the government’s Water Strategy

FREDERICTON, N.B. –  On World Water Day, March 22nd,  several citizen groups joined the Wolastoq Grand Council and held a Press Conference today in Fredericton to call on the Gallant government for the immediate halt to the hastily-planned review process for the New Brunswick’s new Water Strategy.  

“The process is a sham.”, says Mark D’Arcy, New Brunswick Energy East Campaigner for the Council of Canadians.  “The Gallant Government is proposing a new strategy to manage our drinking water and waterways with industry and to replace our current water classification regulation.  The process is not democratic.  The process would weaken, not strengthen, our protection of water.  And the process ignores the reality of climate change, that peoples’ lives and communities are at stake.” 

The process is not democratic. 

Brian Kenny, NB Minister of Environment and Local Government, released the Discussion Paper entitled ‘Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick” on March 6th.  Less than two weeks later, six Open Houses in rapid succession have been scheduled to gather people’s input with written feedback welcome until April 29th (see link below to government website).

“Why has there been limited advertising for these Open House consultations and why is the lead time for this input so rushed?,” asks Mark D’Arcy. “Why is the government conducting secret stakeholder meetings with watershed groups and municipalities that excludes the public? And why is there a third tier of secret stakeholder meetings only with industry. You can’t have a democracy with secret meetings. Is this to pave the way for large-scale projects such as Energy East, Sisson Brook, and shale gas fracking? Premier Brian Gallant needs to halt this process now and start an open and meaningful public process.” 

Ann Pohl, Chair of the Council of Canadians – Kent County Chapter says, “We endorse this call for an open, transparent, engaged and valid process to determine water protection policy and regulations.”

Sharlene Paul, Clanmother speaking on behalf of the Wolastoq Grand Council, says, “It is wrong of Premier Brian Gallant to release any Water Strategy without first initiating discussions with our people.  Our recent declarations here in our non-ceded Wolastoq Homeland – the ‘Water Declaration’ last May 2015 in Red Head, and our ‘Declaration of the Rights of Mother Earth’ in February 2016 - are very clear about the importance of water:  The inherent right to water as a source of life.”

The process is going to weaken, not strengthen, our protection of water.

Lawrence Wuest, a retired scientist who lives in the Nashwaak River watershed, asked, “Why is the government disempowering and dismantling at least six (6) current volunteer watershed organizations along the Saint John River?  The new water strategy proposes to exclude from provincial legislation almost all the individual watersheds directly impacted by the Energy East Pipeline, the Sisson Tungsten Mine, the Minco PLC Woodstock Manganese Project, and shale gas development in the great swath of New Brunswick currently under gas and oil exploration license and lease."

Mr. Wuest emphasizes, "This would remove local community control, monitoring and advocacy in the Nashwaak Watershed, the Meduxnekeag Watershed, the Cannan River/Washademoak Lake Watershed, the Belleisle Bay Watershed, the Kennebecasis Watershed, the Hammond River Watershed, and all other existing sub-watersheds of the Saint John River.”

“Why won’t they implement the Watershed Classification System? “, asks Bill Ayer. “This is the same system successfully used by the State of Maine, which would allow NB and ME to easily exchange data on their shared Transboundary watersheds in the St. Croix and St. John River Basins.”

“We must listen to our Ombudsman,” says Margo Sheppard, member of Council of Canadians – Fredericton chapter. “Ombudsman Charles Murray ruled in 2014 that the province’s Water Classification Regulation was legal and that it was reckless not to put it into practice. Ombudsman Murray stressed that this Water Classification was made a strong legal tool by an amendment of the Clean Water Act on December 19, 2008.”

 “The language in the discussion paper with respect to the management and control of water by industry, including ‘water management partnerships’, is too vague and is also very troubling”, says Susan Linkletter, Vice President of the Organic Crop improvement Association, and former Executive Director of the Petitcodiac Watershed Alliance, “The Water Strategy is proposing a triple bottom line, that is, of managing water for people, nature, and business.  Why, when we know the value of clean drinking water, is the Province laying a foundation that would allow for the bulk transport of water between watersheds in New Brunswick, as well as the export of water out of New Brunswick?”, says Jean Louis Deveau, Chair of the Council of Canadians – Fredericton chapter. 

The process ignores the reality of climate change.

“The new Water Strategy ignores the focus on water in the recent NB report of the Commission on Hydraulic Fracturing”, says Maggie Connell, past Co-chair Council of Canadians – Fredericton chapter.  “The Commissioner detailed steps to protect surface water and groundwater, including the “comprehensive mapping and monitoring of New Brunswick’s groundwater aquifers” and “to mitigate the impacts of climate change-related effects, such as extreme weather, on New Brunswick’s watersheds, coasts and land base”.

Our group has consistently warned Premier Gallant and his Ministers of the need to stop the unsustainable forest clear cutting and the destruction of our wetlands,” says Connell. “The environmental protection of our forests and watersheds must be an urgent priority in order to protect downstream communities.”

Marilyn Merritt-Gray a resident of Kars, one of the Belleisle Bay communities hardest hit by the Fall 2015 rain storm, says “We know all about bad roads down here, spring flooding and washouts, but the September storm was overwhelming. The government says they have already spent $15 million on bridge and road reconstruction, but even with that in our roads in places remain barely passable and other roads remain closed. For weeks the river in front of my house ran brown.”

Halt the current Water Strategy process and start over.  

“It’s important that we halt this current process and start over with a more evidence-based document and with an open and transparent process, a process which includes all Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities in New Brunswick and the Chief Medical Officer of Health,” says Russ Letica, First Nation Consultation Coordinator from the Wolastoqiyik Nation.

The last planned meeting for ‘invitation-only stakeholders’ is in Fredericton on Wednesday, March 23rd from 2:00pm-4:00pm at the Fredericton Inn.  The Open House follows at 4:30pm-6:30pm, also at the Fredericton Inn.  We encourage the general public to attend these meetings, ask these important questions and your local concerns about the protection of our water, and ask the Gallant government to halt the current Water Strategy process.  The process should start only after Premier Gallant properly answers these questions.  


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References: 



Managing Water Resources, 3pp - Released March 1, 2016

http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/env/pdf/Water-Eau/ManagingWaterResources.pdf



Working Towards a Water Strategy for New Brunswick, 24pp – Released March 6, 2016

http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/elg/environment/content/water/content/water_strategy.html
Gallant government watering down the protection of our rivers, streams and lakes
by Jean Louis Deveau

At the Peace and Friendship Alliance (PAFA) meeting of March 19th, Lawrence Wuest introduced us to the Gallant government’s proposed new water strategy which is meant to replace our current Water Classification Regulation, NB Regulation 2002-13.

The following is an attempt to explain the differences between the two.

The proposed new water strategy may be found on all of two pages, that is, on pages 17 and 18 of a discussion paper called Working Together to Build a Water Strategy for New Brunswick. It consists of four main goals.

Goal no. 2 of this new water strategy, as quoted from page 17, is: “to manage and use water responsibly by protecting drinking water and eco-system [sic] health while allowing economic opportunities (my emphasis).”

Of concern is that, compared to our current water policy, water will be used for economic development, “now and in the future.” An example of this would be to use water for fracking. In short, the use of water for economic development is now entrenched in the draft water strategy and so on equal footing with the traditional use of water which is to maintain the health of our environments. These two objectives are diametrically opposed. Plus, there is no indication on how water allocations would be made and who would be making those decisions other than that it would be a shared responsibility amongst the consumers, be it corporations or people, large or small.

On page 6 of the new water strategy, the Government stated that it is committed to engage First Nations communities in the discussion and that information will be sent to those communities. According to discussions held at the PAFA meeting, on March 19th, First Nations were not involved in drafting this new water strategy before it was released to the public. And since the provisions of the Government’s own policy on the Duty to Consult Indigenous Peoples requires that First Nations be consulted at the outset, as opposed to after such a policy has been drafted, the government is already in contravention of its own rules and regulations, not to mention Supreme Court of Canada rulings from which their consultation policy is a derivation of.

Our current water classification system as specified in A Guide to New Brunswick’s Water Classification Regulation, and albeit never implemented, has been in existence since 2002. It is designed to protect aquatic life. This is accomplished by way of engaging with community members to collect data on the quality of water in the streams, rivers, and lakes of their respective communities. This data is then used to classify these bodies of water according to three different classes of water: A, B, or C, where class A consists of the highest quality water. Each body of water would then be managed according to its classification. Nobody is permitted to do anything to change a body of water’s classification without receiving permission from members of the local community, thereby making local communities responsible and accountable for the care and use of their water. This is by far one of the most progressive policies in North America yet risks being dismantled by the Gallant government in exchange for their watered-down policy which is the subject of this notification.

There has been a great deal of interest demonstrated from New Brunswick’s communities in classifying bodies of water. Since 2000, more than a million dollars has been dispensed by the Environmental Trust Fund to non-governmental organizations, such as the Nashwaak Watershed Association and the Groupe du bassin versant de la region du Cap Pele, to collect data needed for the classification of some 19 rivers in New Brunswick.

table


Whereas our current water classification system is focused on a single bottom line of ensuring that the conditions necessary to maintain aquatic life are being met, as illustrated in Table 1 above, the triple bottom line of the new water strategy, that is, of managing water for people, nature, and industry is problematic for at least three reasons. First, the incorporation of water as a means for economic growth ultimately leads to the commodification of water.

The commodification of water means that water could be traded on the free market like oil, gas, and other commodities. Should our water become entangled in free trade agreements, this would undoubtedly lead to conflicts on who should have priority over its use: people, nature, or industry. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement, corporations trump all else. Second, the transferring of the responsibility for the care of our water from communities into the hands of consumers, be it people or corporations, means that not only have local communities lost control over their water but that whoever has the most power and influence, in terms of corporations and or other consumers, gets to decide who uses our water. Third, this way of managing our water is not in keeping with the government’s obligations of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples who view water as sacred and who would never accept water being used for economic development.

My second point is about the lack of transparency over this issue. Despite the importance and gravity of this major policy change in water use, public consultations on this new water strategy have been occurring with little to no advertisement, thus making it nearly impossible for interested citizens to become engaged. Appearing in the Gallant Government’s last throne speech, and in a press release which was not picked up by the media, public notifications have not been widely distributed. To date, four open houses have occurred, with only two left to happen this week: Monday in Saint John and Wednesday in Fredericton. The meetings are also happening during supper time, that is, between 4:30 pm and 6:30, making it difficult for many people to attend, particularly those who finish work at 5:00 pm and those with young children in daycare. By way of comparison, the 2012 Citizen Engagement tour for the new oil and natural gas standards were well advertised and took place between 6:30 and 8:30 pm.

And finally, I wish to refer to a comment on page 13 of the new water strategy made in reference to the deficiencies of the current water classification system.

[Department of Environment and Local Government] was advised that deficiencies within this regulation prevented its use to classify surface waters and the program was put on hold. Furthermore DELG received legal advice that suggested attempting to fix this regulation would equate to an entire rewrite of that part of the legislation.

Charles Murray, our Ombudsman did not agree with the concerns expressed above by the Department of Environment and Local Government as stated on pages 5-6 of his report:

At this point, it should be noted that no court has ruled upon the Regulation. Accordingly, the suggestions that the Regulation is void or unenforceable are thus far opinion— perhaps correct, but not having the force of law...The suggestion that there continues to be unaddressed issues about the legality of Regulation 2002-13 12 years after its coming into force strains credulity.

To conclude, the Government is now developing policy that would transform water into a vehicle for economic development. Consultations with Indigenous peoples have not yet occurred and public open houses will have been completed by the time most New Brunswickers will have heard anything about this, leaving the majority of us with few options to make our voices heard on what is undoubtedly our most important and precious resource—water. The closing date for comments on the new water strategy is April 29th and so the time to act is now.

 
Creating a regenerative economy in N.B.

KEiTH HELMUTH


What kind of economy will New Brunswick have in the new energy future? A renewable energy platform is clearly coming and new energy platforms create new economies. The extraction and refining of hydrocarbons launched a new energy platform, which has created the modern economy and its many benefits. However, the growth of the hydrocarbon economy has now developed to such a scale that it has burst through the safe operating limits of earth’s geochemical and ecological boundaries, with increasingly negative effects. This is an unwelcome thought. We used to think that hydrocarbon energy paved the road to a better life. Up to a point, this idea made sense, but a threshold of reversal has been crossed.

Crossing this threshold means that, from a certain point on, the negative effects of burning hydrocarbons will be greater than the benefits. The danger of these negative effects is now so serious that it has brought almost all national governments on earth into agreement on reducing and limiting carbon emissions.

The message from the Paris climate agreement is clear: the energy platform of the economy must shift from reliance on carbon releasing fuels to a diversity of non-carbon emitting, renewable energy sources.

Fortunately, renewable energy innovators have been at bat, and it now looks like the most important public policy question is how fast this transition can be made without upsetting the apple cart of the economy.

In N.B., we are fortunate that the government has recently announced an excellent program to facilitate this transition -- Locally-Owned Renewable Energy that is Small Scale (LORESS). It’s a small start, but it’s heading in the right direction.

This transition is enormously attractive. We have the tools, materials, and knowledge to create a clean, rapidly growing, and sustainable energy platform. And the clincher is this: the renewable energy platform has the potential to help create a regenerative economy that builds up steady-state prosperity.

What might this mean for N.B.? Currently, the government seems to have one foot firmly on the hydrocarbon dock and the other stepping gingerly into the renewable energy boat. Will government grasp the economic potential of renewable energy and get fully on board?

What comes after the last use of the Energy East pipeline (if built)? What comes after fracked-out shale gas wells (if drilled)? When these projects have faded, and the jobs they created have vanished, what will they have contributed to a sustainable, self-regenerating economy?

The renewable energy industry, on the other hand, is creating a fast growing sector of sustainable, community-based employment.

Statistical analysis shows that for every $1 million invested in the oil and gas industry two jobs are created. For every $1 million invested in renewable energy 15 jobs are created. For every $1 million invested in upgrading the energy efficiency of buildings 14 jobs are created.

(See www.bluegreencanada.ca/more-bang-for-our-buck)

One of the key factors about the shift to renewable energy is that it triggers a new way of thinking about security and prosperity. It shifts thinking about the economy from the extraction of resources to the cultivation and regenerating of resources.

For example, policies that support the expansion of local food production and marketing will help build up a regenerative economy. Can we imagine a N.B. that produces at least 50 per cent of the food it needs?

Likewise, policies for woodlot and Crown land management that improve biodiversity and insure the longterm harvesting of high quality timber would move the forest industry from extraction to regeneration, and help build up a steady-state prosperity for forest-based livelihoods.

Will government catch the opportunity to facilitate a regenerative economy? This depends on whether the smart, renewable energy platform is placed at the centre of the province’s economic development future.

   

Keith Helmuth is a member of the Woodstock Sustainable energy Group

KJIPUKTUK (Halifax) – The Council of Canadians and its four New Brunswick chapters are calling on the Gallant government to recognize it has no choice but to extend the fracking moratorium, after the report it commissioned demonstrated that its five conditions for lifting the moratorium have not been met.

“Based on the Commission’s report, the government of New Brunswick must commit to a legislated moratorium on hydraulic fracturing in the province. All five conditions, including social licence, have not been met and will require a lot of work,” says Denise Melanson, Council of Canadians’ Kent County chapter media spokesperson. “To give the people of this province some peace of mind and some security, the government should close the book on this industry.”

“We stand with our Indigenous allies including Ron Tremblay, Grand Chief of the Wolastoq Grand Council. This report clearly recognizes the constitutional duty to consult Indigenous peoples, highlighting a critical reason a legislated moratorium is needed,” says Maggie Connell, co-chair of the Council of Canadians’ Fredericton chapter.

Angela Giles, the Council’s Atlantic Regional Organizer based in Halifax, added “The Commission report highlights the need for a transition to clean energy for New Brunswick’s future energy mix. Given the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, shale gas cannot be part of the future. We need to focus on real solutions to the climate crisis in New Brunswick and beyond.”

Representatives from the Council of Canadians’ Fredericton and Kent County chapters attended the private briefing as well as the public release of the Commission’s report this morning in Fredericton.

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The report is available on the NB Commission on Hydraulic Fracturing website.

Commission’s Fracking Report Shows Moratorium Remains Smartest Policy And That Time Is Right To Begin New Brunswick’s Transition to Low-Carbon Economy

FREDERICTON — The report released today from the New Brunswick Commission on Hydraulic Fracturing provides more evidence that the provincial government made the smart policy decision by putting a moratorium in place and throws down the gauntlet for N.B. to start the transition to a thriving low-carbon economy.

Consider what the Commissioners say in their report:

  • The challenge and opportunity for economic development today is in clean and low-carbon technologies as governments across the world — including New Brunswick — prepare to deal with the opportunities and challenges of climate change. The Commissioners say New Brunswick must transition away from the old-world economies of resource extraction into a new value-added and knowledge-based era driven by new forms of energy, stating: “The world is shifting towards integrated energy systems that will be supported by a variety of advanced technologies, most of which will not require fossil fuels.”

  • The environmental protection and energy regulatory system in New Brunswick is prone to conflicts of interest. The Commissioners highlight significant gaps in the current framework, such as the lack of understanding and mapping of our groundwater system, and highlight pieces that are broken entirely, such as the failure of the Water Classification regulation for protecting rivers and streams. The current approach means a government department has to have two heads, meaning ministers serve two masters — one that promotes energy projects and another that regulates them. This system leads not only to confusion, anger and distrust but also creates too many unanswered questions, especially with respect to the cumulative effects of energy projects on water, air and public health.

  • Nation-to-Nation communication with First Nation communities is sorely lacking and needs years of repair and capacity-building for all involved.

“The Commissioners rightly point out that the world shifted with the signing of the first universal climate agreement and that the real opportunities for jobs and economic growth comes from clean energy and energy efficiency,” says Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick. “The economic case for renewables grows stronger every month and energy efficiency has long been recognized as a tool for creating jobs and keeping electricity affordable.”

Corbett continued: “It’s clear from the Commissioners’ report that New Brunswick’s regulatory and oversight system is prone to conflicts of interest and is at best years away from being ready to handle shale gas. If we spend 90% of our effort and New Brunswickers’ ingenuity focused on building the clean energy transition then we’d all be much better off than continuing an endless conversation about fracking.”

Corbett concluded: “The moratorium was the smart public policy decision in 2014 and it remains the right public policy well into the future. The Commissioners outline the crossroads our province — and the world at large — is facing, and it’s hard to imagine a future for new shale gas development in a world committed to protecting our families from climate change. Our best bet for creating jobs right now in New Brunswick is through energy efficiency and clean power technology. That’s the road we need to take, and it’s the road that doesn’t put our drinking water or communities’ health at risk.”
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The report will be available on the Commission's website.

Read the submissions the commission received from groups and individuals here.

Read the commissioners’ blog here.

To arrange an interview, contact: Jon MacNeill, Communications Director. Office: 458-8747; Cell: 261-1353; Email: jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca
Vidéos et plans de leçons gratuits sur les changements climatiques

(Adaptés au curriculum des écoles secondaires du Nouveau-Brunswick.)

Les élèves apprennent sur les changements climatiques par le biais d’observations de la nature faites par des experts et citoyens locaux ayant beaucoup de connaissances sur le climat local (apiculteurs, agriculteurs, conducteurs de chasse-neige, pêcheurs, jardiniers et aînés des Premières Nations). 

Accédez au matériel pédagogique ici : http://www.fundy-biosphere.ca/fr/projets/sensibilisation.html

Les écoles peuvent demander une présentation et session de formation gratuite pour leurs enseignants offerte par le personnel de Réserve de biosphère de Fundy, afin d’apprendre comment utiliser ces ressources dans leurs salles de classe.  

Veuillez contacter Megan de Graaf par courriel à info@fundy-biosphere.ca.

Réservez votre formation avant le 31 mars 2016 !

NOTEZ BIEN: CE MATÉRIEL EST DISPONIBLE EN ANGLAIS SEULEMENT POUR L'INSTANT.



Wolastoq Grand Council Addresses the Energy East Pipeline
Ottawa January 29, 2016

The Wolastoq Grand Council represents the non-ceded homeland of the Wolastoqewiyik who occupy the homeland and waterways as follows: North - Wolastoq River (aka St.John River which flows from Maine to the Bay of Fundy), South - Kenepek River (aka Kennebec), East - Supeq (aka Atlantic Ocean), and West – Wahsipekuk (aka St. Lawrence River).

As members of the Wolastoq Grand Council we unanimously oppose the Energy East Pipeline Project in order to protect our non-ceded homeland and waterways, our traditional and cultural connection to our lands, waterways, and air. The Wolastoq Grand Council has serious concerns for the safety and protection of the animals, fish, birds, insects, plants and tree life that sustains our Wolastoq Nation.

The Wolastoq Grand Council recognizes and values the statements made by the Federal Government on January 27, 2016 to consult with Indigenous Nations with respect to the project of our Ancestral Homeland. The Wolastoq Grand Council is willing to meet with the Minister of Natural Resources Jim Carr and other senior personnel in critical discussions that are consistent with our Peace and Friendship Treaties in a Nation-to-Nation relationship. There is a legal duty of the Crown to address and support our concerns due to the inadequacy of the National Energy Board process.

The Wolastoq Grand Council will expect from the appropriate Crown delegate and provincial representative, a written acceptance of our traditional philosophy, and our rejection of the Energy East tar sands pipeline as soon as possible.

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Ottawa, le 29 janvier 2016

Le Grand conseil de la communauté Wolastoq représente la patrie non cédée des Wolastoqewiyik. Ces derniers occupent les terres et les cours d’eau suivant : Nord – Wolastoq River (maintenant connu sous le nom de fleuve Saint-Jean et qui coule de l’état du Maine à la Baie de Fundy), Sud – Kenepek River (aussi connu sous le nom de la Kennebec), Est – Supeq (également appelé l’Océan Atlantique) et Ouest – Wahsipekuk (appelé également le fleuve Saint-Laurent).


En tant que membres du Grand conseil Wolastoq, nous sommes unanimement contre le projet de l’Oléoduc Énergie Est afin de protéger notre patrie non cédée et nos cours d’eau, nos rapports traditionnels et culturels avec nos terres, nos cours d’eau et nos espaces aériens. Le Grand conseil Wolastoq entretient de vives inquiétudes à l’égard de la santé et la sécurité des animaux, des poissons, des oiseaux, des insectes, des plantes et de la vie des arbres qui soutiennent notre peuple Wolastoq. 


Le Grand conseil Wolastoq reconnait et valorise les déclarations faites par le gouvernement fédéral le 27 janvier 2016. Ce dernier avait dit qu’il consultera les peuples autochtones par rapport au projet de notre territoire ancestral. Le Grand conseil Wolastoq est disposé à rencontrer le ministre des Ressources naturelles, Jim Carr, et d’autres fonctionnaires de rang supérieur, pour entamer des discussions critiques qui sont conformes à nos traités de paix et d’amitié dans une relation de nation à nation. La Couronne a une obligation légale d’adresser et de soutenir nos préoccupations en raison de l’inefficacité du processus de l’Office national de l’énergie.

Le Grand conseil Wolastoq attend du délégué approprié de la Couronne une confirmation écrite de notre philosophie traditionnelle et de notre rejet du projet de l’Oléoduc Énergie Est, de la pipeline et de ses sables bitumineux, et ce, le plus rapidement possible.

Ron Tremblay,
Wolastoq Grand Chief / Grand chef de la nation Wolastoq
OBITUARY OF THE ACADIAN FOREST - With great sadness we mourn the sudden, tragic death of more than 12,600 acres/year of Acadian Forest which, until this year, had been placed in the care of its Trustee, the Province of New Brunswick, for heritage conservation purposes. The death was caused by a routine case of what the Province of New Brunswick calls “carefully managed clear cutting." The amount cut is equivalent to cutting Mactaquac Provincial Park 10 times every year and for the next 25 years.

This part of New Brunswick's forest had been entrusted to the Province for perpetual care by rural and urban residents alike for the benefit of all generations. Felled by the tens of thousands, primarily along rivers and streams, the premature and suspicious death means this forest will no longer be able to provide much needed water flow, temperature and flood control.

Along with more severe soil erosion and increased flooding in its communities, this tragic 'death by clear cutting' will further reduce fish populations, notably that of the pride of New Brunswick rivers, the Atlantic Salmon. As well, thousands of deer and countless other species of animals and plants associated with Old Growth Forests will now die because the shelter and food they need to survive that had been provided by the forest was, of course, also destroyed by the clear cut.

The Acadian Forest is survived by a very distant relative, the Tree Plantation, unable to provide the same type of life-giving function of its now dead relative. Meanwhile, yet another 'unnatural death by clear cut' in New Brunswick is prompting calls for an inquest into what has been called the reckless endangerment of all the New Brunswick Forests by their Trustee, the Province. In a stunning admission, the Province of New Brunswick has admitted to openly colluding with serial clear cutters. Adding to the concern is the fact that the Forest estate was stripped of assets by 'serial clear cutters' before its death and so left nothing to the residents of New Brunswick.

The dead forest, more than 10,000 years old and now gone forever, was predeceased by northern cod stocks off the Atlantic coast who also fell victim to "careful management" by their Trustees.

In lieu of flowers and other tokens of mourning for this beloved member of New Brunswick's Natural Family, letters, e-mails, tweets and other expressions of outrage directed to Premier Brian Gallant, Natural Resources Minister Denis Landry, and your MLA are requested.

Rest in peace Acadian Forest.
Conservation Council Logo
Jan. 27, 2016

Statement on critical changes to pipeline/energy project assessment

FREDERICTON — Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, issued this statement following the announcement today from Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr and Minister of the Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna:

“We want to congratulate Ministers Carr and McKenna for using both common sense and a comprehensive understanding of the urgency we need to tackle carbon pollution by requiring major oil production projects, like TransCanada’s Energy East pipeline, to undergo a science-based assessment, including First Nations' traditional knowledge, as well as direct and upstream greenhouse gas pollution linked to the project.   

It was naive and foolhardy not to include greenhouse gas analysis in oil pipeline projects but in its sheer stubborn determination to rush tarsands oil to export markets and damn the climate consequences, the former government did exactly that. One take-away lesson for decision makers everywhere today is that short cuts in environmental assessments are usually anything but.

We also welcome the Ministers' intention to ensure the public’s right to participate in project reviews. That means the input of people from Edmundston, to the Tobique, all along the St. John River through to communities along our Bay of Fundy must be respected, instead of ignored. We look forward to working with this government in the near future to ensure that the climate analysis and other new requirements are robust.”
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For more information or to arrange an interview, contact:

Jon MacNeill, Communications: 458-8747 | 261-1353 | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca
$100 DISCOUNT UNTIL DEC 31 

On March 7th, 8th and 9th there will be an opportunity for hands-on training into the planning and application of climate change considerations for forest managers. This training is designed for all natural resource managers across the Maritimes who are interested in actively enhancing the ability of forests to cope with changing climate conditions. individuals and small teams can participate in this training. The training enables participants to incorporate applicable adaptations into a current or developing forest management plan. The workshop will take place in Fredericton. Space is limited to 40 participants.

Registration:

Registration cost includes lunch, refreshments, dinner on Monday evening, evening activities and a complete set of digital resourcesVisit our website at ARPFNB | AFANB – Fees and Payments to reserve your space now with a credit card. Cash/cheque will also be accepted by Lori Curtis 506-452-6933 info@arpfnb at the ARPFNB office; please contact her to make arrangements.

ARPFNB member                         $175

Non-member before Dec. 31         $175

Non-member after Dec. 31            $275


The following letter was sent to the Minister today....

Hon. Denis Landry 
Minister of Natural Resources


As a resident of the Province of New Brunswick, I am deeply concerned that the spraying of our forests is a very dangerous practice that is irresponsible, reckless and potentially affecting the health of its residents. 


As the President of the Moncton Fish & Game Association, I am also concerned that spraying is also killing our wildlife. Animals in the forest and fish in our waterways are allegedly suffering the negative effects of the spraying of our woodlands. We know that the practice is legal and permissible in our province however we need to ask ourselves should it continue? Should companies be allowed to spray to prevent hardwood growth? Should they be allowed to spray to prevent the spread of berries and other nutrients that wildlife eat? 


As a province that relies very heavily on its natural resources, (which by the way include generations of hunters and fishermen all of which bring in tens of millions to our NB economy), we all should be deeply concerned. There is a fine line that we have to respect when dealing with Mother Nature. She is not very forgiving at times and it may take many many years to correct the wrongs of previous generations. While current forestry practices permit vast clear cuts and the related spraying of these chemicals, all of these activities must be analysed. 


Potentially, a moratorium on spraying could be put into place until more scientific information is available. We know that this government is not opposed to moratoriums as is evident by the current one on fracking. Rather than point fingers at companies which will garner the whole cause no credibility at all, we as residents and people who enjoy the outdoors, people concerned for our own health and the health of our children, we all need to band together and question the government in a relentless, credible yet organized public campaign to end this practice once and for all. 


Forestry activities will continue and as a manageable resource they rightfully should continue; however, neighbouring Provinces of Nova Scotia and Quebec are doing very well with their forestry practices, both enjoying great revenues which belong to the taxpayers and they are NOT spraying. If they can do it then why are we not able to continue forestry operations without spraying and potentially harming people, wildlife and fish? 


The Moncton Fish & Game Association has taken an official stance that we do not support the spraying of our woodlands. 


Thank you and I look forward to a response.


Robert Snider, 

President

Moncton Fish & Game Association
OPEN LETTER TO THE PEOPLE OF N.B.



Our Chief Medical Officer of Health has been fired.   No cause given.   No reason given.



Dr Eilish Cleary is an ethical, courageous, hard-working, award-winning doctor and perhaps the best CMOH this province has ever been fortunate to have.   She has worked tirelessly to protect the health of the people of N.B..   She has been a wonderful ambassador for Canada in her selfless service in West Africa during the Ebola Crisis.   She has brought decent health care for the first time to First Nations.       Why, then, was she fired ?



Liberal officials are refusing to talk.   Do they even understand the meaning of Public Service ?



Was her error to put the health of the people of N.B. first  ?   Was her commitment to researching the issues more information than our government wanted ?   Was her bravery in speaking the truth on health matters too much for our “bought-and-paid-for” government  ?   Did Industry pull the strings ?  



Are politicians once again showing their true colours?   If so, they have opened a can of worms.   The outrage is growing.   Something is rotten in New Brunswick.





FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015

FREDERICTON —
 Stephanie Merrill, Director of Freshwater Protection with the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, issued the following statement in response to the Department of Environment’s approval of the Sisson Mine Environmental Impact Assessment:

“I’m surprised by today’s announcement considering it’s been made in a vacuum. Final approval of this project is a joint process between the provincial and federal government — but we’re still waiting on the review from the feds, and there are outstanding parts of that review that we’re committed to participating in.

The province also has not released the summary of the Independent Review Panel to the public, as it’s required to do by law. The summary needs to be released right away for the sake of transparency, otherwise our government is playing fast and loose with the rules that let people participate in this process.

The company behind the mine proposal, Sisson Mines Ltd, is still far from securing the financing needed to move forward with the project, and no public financing accounts have been released. At best, today’s announcement is a signal that the province is open to business, but in reality, you can put lipstick on a pig, but it’s still a pig.

The conditions of approval are vague when it comes to critical issues like emergency planning, the security of the tailings dam, and liability. Most striking, we’re letting the fox guard the henhouse by leaving the responsibility to protect the Nashwaak River and watershed directly in the hands of the company. Even the International Council on Mining —  composed of the world’s largest companies — said yesterday that the control standards for tailing facilities are inadequate and the council would be reviewing and revising its standards.

We’ve seen at least three major tailings disasters in the past year and a half — at Mount Polley in B.C., the Buenavista del Cobre mine in Mexico, and most recently in Brazil,  where 16 people died and the Brazilian government announced yesterday a $5.2 (billion) USD billion lawsuit against the company responsible.

First and foremost at this point, we call on the province to release the summary report of the Independent Review Panel so New Brunswickers know what the experts in the scientific community have to say about this project proposal.”
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For more information or to arrange an interview, contact:

Jon MacNeill, Conservation Council of New Brunswick: 458-8747 | 261-1353 |jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick has released a new special edition of its membership magazine,
EcoAlert: <2° — Making it Happen at COP21 in Paris.


This special edition will help you cut through the jargon and technicalities of international climate negotiations to understand: What the heck is COP21 in Paris? What’s it all about? What does the fight against climate change mean for me, our province, and Canada as a whole?


  • In this issue: • the road to locally-made clean energy in NB • charting the course toward a low-carbon economy • a brief history of international climate negotiations • best and the rest: countries’ climate plans heading into COP21 • how you can live greener and cleaner at home and work • and more


Click here to download a PDF version of this issue, or head to our archives for past editions.
FREDERICTON — Des groupes d’intérêts publics et d’experts au Nouveau-Brunswick affirme qu’une nouvelle loi est nécessaire pour garantir que nos forêts publiques soient gérées pour satisfaire les besoins de tous les Néobrunswickois.

Ce groupe qui inclut des représentants des organisations de la faune, de la communauté scientifique, des propriétaires de lots boisés, et des organisations environnementales et de conservation demande que l’on prépare en toute urgence une nouvelle loi sur les terres et forêts de la Couronne.

Dans une déclaration expédiée au gouvernement provinciale aujourd’hui, la coalition affirme que la loi actuelle, qui a été promulguée en 1982, met de l’avant une approche de gestion forestière désuète et qui ne tient pas compte des préférences de toute la province.  La gestion forestière est devenue très complexe et les Néobrunswickois s’attendent maintenant que les forêts soient gérées pour leur eau et leur faune, pour la récréation et pour d’autres usages ainsi que pour des emplois et des revenus.

La déclaration fait référence au rapport du juin 2015 de la vérificatrice générale, Kim MacPherson, sur la gestion des forêts qui propose que nos forêts publiques soient gérées pour ses valeurs économiques, environnementales et sociales, et qui souligne que la province a perdu des revenus avec sa gestion des forêts publiques durant les cinq dernières années.

Le groupe affirme qu’une nouvelle loi devrait :

  1. Établir des principes clairs pour la gestion des forêts publiques afin de protéger la vie dans les forêts, les bénéfices de la nature, les occasions pour des entreprises forestières ainsi que les valeurs récréatives et le tout dans le contexte des changements climatiques;
  1. Clarifier et rétablir le gouvernement comme fiduciaire responsable de la surveillance des terres et des forêts de la Couronne dans l’intérêt de la population;
  1. Assurer la transparence lors de l’établissement de buts et objectifs liés à la foresterie et de la réalisation de ces buts et inclure un système robuste d’engagement et de consultation publique pour l’ensemble du processus;
  1. Respecter les traits de paix et d’amitié et établir des mécanismes pour la consultation par l’entremise de consentement libre, préalable et informé avec les populations autochtones;
  1. Appuyer la diversification et la transformation avec valeur ajoutée dans le secteur des produits forestiers du Nouveau-Brunswick; et
  1. Garantir que les lots boisés privés fournissent une partie proportionnelle de l’approvisionnement en bois et fassent la promotion de la productivité des lots boisés privés grâce à leur gestion, leur prix et leurs mesures de mise en marché.
Lisez la déclaration des groupes et les informations de base ici http://forestsfornb.org/?page_id=296&lang=fr

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« Nos membres sont convaincues que de permettre plus de coupes dans les zones de conservation pour récolter des arbres dans des endroits sensibles, comme les zones tampons le long des cours d’eau, pourrait mettre en péril les populations de saumon de l’Atlantique en endommageant les habitats dont ils dépendent, fait remarquer Debbie Norton, présidente du Conseil du saumon du Nouveau-Brunswick.  C’est horrifiant de constater l’ampleur des changements au régime de gestion forestière qui ont été imposés sans tenir compte des inquiétudes des groupes de conservation et des bassins versants.  Nous avons approfondi notre engagement à travailler en coopération avec le gouvernement provincial, les Premières Nations, l’industrie forestière, les scientifiques, les organismes de conservations et autres groupes intéressés afin de mieux gérer nos ressources de la Couronne. »

« Ce qui est particulièrement remarquable ici, c’est la large gamme de personnes qui se sont réunie et qui affirment que : Cette loi ne fonctionne plus pour nous – elle ne contribue pas à la richesse de la province, constate Lois Corbett, directrice générale du Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick. « Nos forêts tiennent une place très spéciale dans le cœur des Néobrunswickois et des groupes très variés s’entendent pour dire que quelque chose ne fonctionne plus; il est temps d’y voir. »

« Des naturalistes de toutes les régions du Nouveau-Brunswick sont très inquiets concernant le manque d’attention portée par la province à la nature et aux habitats dans nos forêts publiques. On peut en constater les conséquences chaque jour, et nous sommes prêts à travailler avec le gouvernement pour préparer une nouvelle loi qui protègerait mieux la nature au Nouveau-Brunswick, » affirme Vanessa Roy-McDougall, directrice générale de Nature Nouveau-Brunswick.

« Le Nouveau-Brunswick traine en arrière de toutes les provinces canadiennes sauf l’IPÉ en matière de protection de zones naturelles sur les terres de la Couronne. Une nouvelle loi devrait rédiger de nouvelles directives sur comment conserver les forêts résilientes et la biodiversité indigène, compte tenu des changements climatiques et appuyer un plus grand éventail d’entreprises forestières, » entrevoit Roberta Clowater, directrice générale de la Société pour la nature et les parcs du Canada – Nouveau-Brunswick.

« La principale lacune de la loi de 1982 est que les utilisateurs industriels sont devenus les gérants des terres de la Couronne au lieu d’en être des clients; ceci crée des conflits d’intérêts qui ne peuvent seulement être résolus en créant une nouvelle loi sur les terres et forêts de la Couronne. Les propriétaires de lots boisés sont d’avis que les gens qui récoltent le bois sur les terres de la Couronne devraient partager le même intérêt commun de payer la juste valeur marchande pour le bois et les autres produits de la forêt. Il est temps de corriger les erreurs du passé à l’avantage de tout le Nouveau-Brunswick, » préconise Andrew Clark de la Fédération des propriétaires de lots boisés du Nouveau-Brunswick.

« La Fédération de la faune du Nouveau-Brunswick appuie l’utilisation des forêts publiques de la province dans le but de fournir une variété d’avantages économiques et sociaux. Toutefois, ces utilisations ne doivent pas compromettre l’intégrité des habitats naturels et de la biodiversité, » selon Charles Leblanc, président de le Fédération de la faune du Nouveau-Brunswick.

Pour plus de renseignements ou pour organiser une entrevue, contactez :

Sabine Dietz, Nature NB: 536-1260 | 536-7560 | sabine.dietz@bellaliant.net (bilingue)

Jon MacNeill, Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick : 458-8747 | 261-1353 | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

Andrew Clark, Fédération des propriétaires de lots boisés du Nouveau-Brunswick: 459-2990 | 324-3380 |andrewclark@xplornet.com

Peter J Cronin, Conseil du saumon du Nouveau-Brunswick: 444-9012 | 238-4616 | pjcronin18@gmail.com

Roberta Clowater, Société pour la nature et les parcs du Canada – Nouveau-Brunswick: 452-9902 | rclowater@cpaws.org

Rod Currie, Fédération de la faune du Nouveau-Brunswick: 458-5643 | racurrie@nb.sympatico.ca
Attention: The New Brunswick Hydraulic Fracturing Commission

Ancient Voices

We are totally dependent on the Earth for life, and because of the arrogance of a superiority attitude, western society is headed in the wrong direction.  As a consequence, climate change is here and people are in a panic. Grandchildren are asking, “What will happen to me?”

What 200 year old prophesies said has now come to pass.  People have disobeyed the natural laws of the universe, and are stubbornly determined to ignore the voices of reason and truth. The Earth governs all life here, and she will have no mercy.  

The Wolastokewinobk (Maliseet Grand Council) is the traditional decision-making structure of the Wolastokewiyik - the people of the beautiful river. We are the river people, indigenous to the entire St. John River watershed. Our Grand Council is made up of our clans, from the oldest to the youngest.  We send these words to your commission on behalf of our extended families, as well as the deer, the moose, birds, fishes, and all other living things within our traditional territories.   Our lands and waters have never been ceded or surrendered, therefore we are still the title holders. 

Canada, New Brunswick and big business have and continue to exploit and expropriate our traditional lands and resources amounting to categorical infringement on our right to use our land and hunt, fish, and gather. Currently the following industries are infringing on our Aboriginal and Treaty Rights:

  • All attempts to further the industry of hydraulic fracturing for natural gas in our territory must stop immediately. 

First of all our people have not been adequately consulted, and in fact we have been abused and punished for taking a stand to protect our sacred lands and waters.   Secondly, traditional stories in our language tell us of a time when there was great flooding on the river and the reversing falls was caused by an ancient earthquake.  There is also historical evidence of major fault lines through the centre of our territory from earlier earth quakes which is what caused salt water lakes to form all the way up to central parts of the Province of New Brunswick. It is well known that ‘fracking’ causes earthquakes to happen, because of the lubricated, chemically laced cocktail that is pumped into the ground under extremely high pressure.  There is too much of a risk to allow fracturing to take place here and we do not support this destructive industry.  We request that you to put a stop to this detrimental activity in our homeland.

  • The Irving Forestry Companies have not only clear cut our forests, they are also spraying poisonous carcinogenic herbicides such as glyphosate all over ‘our land,’ to kill hardwood trees, and other green vegetation. Both human and animal health is at serious risk, not to mention leaving no food for the animals.  

Streams, brooks and creeks are drying up, causing the dwindling of Atlantic salmon and trout.  Places where our people gather medicines, hunt deer and moose are being contaminated with poison. We were not warned about the use of these dangerous herbicides, but then cancer rates have been on the rise in Maliseet communities, especially breast cancers in women and younger people are dying from cancer. 

  • Open Pit Mining for tungsten and molybdenum is another infringement on the rights of our people – archeology shows that our people have been there around 7000 years – the oldest period found in the heart of New Brunswick. 

This is Maliseet traditional territory and we have not been consulted. Open pit mines require tailing ponds, this one designated to be the largest in the world.  It is well known that all tailing ponds have a high probability to breach their bounds, and definitely will seep out into the environment. A spill or leak from the Sisson Brook open pit mine will permanently contaminate the Nashwaak River, which is a tributary of the Wolastok (St. John River) and surrounding waterways.   This is the only place left clean enough for the survival of the Atlantic salmon.

  • Oil pipelines and refineries are also among the current abominable schemes, bent on contaminating and destroying the very last inch of (Wblastokok) Maliseet territory.  

The above mentioned industries are just another layer of infringements on the aboriginal and treaty rights of the Wolastokewiyik. Rivers, lakes, streams, and lands have been contaminated already to the point that we are unable to gather our annual supply of fiddleheads, and medicines.  This territory has never been ceded or surrendered by our people – yet not an inch of our land has been spared for our traditional use.  Government and industry blindly and carelessly proceed to exploit and misappropriate Indigenous lands and resources to the point of extreme damage and destruction, and continue to ignored the concerns and protests of Indigenous peoples in New Brunswick.   

The Supreme Court of Canada has stated that all levels of government have a “duty to consult with aboriginal people” prior to the beginning of any project, or any other kind of land use, that would cause an infringement on the Indigenous rights of our people.  

The Wolastokewiyik (Maliseet People) - the Title Holders - have not been consulted on any of the above projects. Therefore governments and/or companies do not have our consent to proceed with hydro-fracturing,  open pit mining, or the building of pipelines for gas and oil bitumen, on or across our traditional lands and waters.     

The duty to consult has become a meaningless process. Companies meet with INAC Chiefs, who’s jurisdiction is limited to within each of their respective reserves. Individuals are given a power point presentation, and then told the next step is accommodation.  Question: then to the chief  - What do you want?

The majority of the people do not go to these meetings due to the manipulation of the process, and the lack of regard for collective rights. Collective rights require collective discussion and collective decision-making. The closest interpretation of our treaty and aboriginal right to consultation is written in international law: Free, Prior and informed consent.  

In conclusion, humans are supposed to be responsible and intelligent beings, who were given instruction on how to live on the earth.

One of the oldest teachings about how to live on the land – “ wihkwelan tehpo eli powalbkw wblam keti sepowsowipbn”  itbm Kelowbskap.”  Take only what you need in order to live. Maintaining the balance of nature is the way to live on the earth. Arrogance is why we are going in the wrong direction.   If we do not follow the spiritual laws of the universe, nature will take over. There will be no mercy in nature, only law.  

It is the Earth that governs life here – all life comes from the earth. You can have no value for resources that have been stolen.   Greed, selfishness, and foolishness have taken over, and they have no value at all for life.  Why else have become the enemy of the earth?  

Business as usual is over.  Oil and Carbon is over.   We will pay for damages by what is coming.  Economies will be wrecked. If we continue to disregard the laws of nature the Earth will bring about the balance herself, through diseases, crisis events – etc. We have to change the way of living. 

Sincerely, 

Alma H. Brooks
Grandmother, The Maliseet Grand Council

October 15, 2015





Pour diffusion immédiate
16 novembre 2015

Des prix environnementaux attribués à des citoyens néo-brunswickois

Samedi le 14 novembre 2015, deux prix environnementaux ont été attribués à des citoyens du Nouveau-Brunswick pour souligner leurs services exemplaires à leur collectivité. Ces prix, accordés par le Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick (RENB), reconnaissent les efforts importants déployés par les citoyens et de groupes de citoyens pour protéger et restaurer l’environnement au Nouveau-Brunswick.

Jocelyne Gauvin, du Groupe de développement durable du Pays de Cocagne, a été honorée avec un Certificat d’accomplissement environnemental pour sa passion et son engagement pour la viabilité de l’environnement et des communautés du Pays de Cocagne. Selon Raissa Marks, directrice générale du RENB, « Pour plusieurs années, Jocelyne a dévoué son inépuisable énergie à l’environnement et aux enjeux liés au développement durable dans sa région avec le Groupe de développement durable du Pays de Cocagne. Comme elle s’enligne vers la semi-retraite, le temps était opportun afin d’honorer son travail et ses nombreux efforts.»

Le Prix Samaqan décerné à ceux qui se sont dévoués pour les eaux a été offert à Donald Killorn « pour son engagement inépuisable et ses approches innovatrices pour la conservation des écosystèmes d'eau douce. » Killorn est le directeur général de Eastern Charlotte Waterways, un groupe visant à promouvoir une gestion et un développement responsable de l'environnement par des actions de base communautaires.

Ces prix ont été présentés durant l’Assemblée générale annuelle du RENB qui a eu lieu à Saint-Jean le 14 novembre 2015.

Le Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick est un réseau de communication sans but lucratif comprenant plus de 90 groupes environnementaux de citoyens et de citoyennes de toutes les régions de la province. Le but du Réseau est d’encourager les communications parmi les groupes et entre les groupes et le gouvernement et d’autres secteurs.

-30-

Personne-contact:
Raissa Marks, 506-855-4144
October 15, 2015



PRESS RELEASE



TransCanada blocking local residents from attending their Energy East Pipeline Community Liaison Committee meeting



SAINT JOHN – This week, nine local residents and landowners requested to sit in as observers at TransCanada’s Energy East Pipeline Community Liaison Committee meeting held at the Hampton Inn, Saint John, on Wednesday, October 14.  Blocking their entrance, a security guard informed them that only members of the Committee were permitted at the meeting.



Residents then asked to speak with a TransCanada representative. A short discussion took place with Pamela McKay, Trans Canada’s community consultant, which was videotaped. Ms. McKay informed the residents that TransCanada did not have a policy to allow observers at their Energy East community liaison meetings and that the residents would not be permitted to enter the meeting room.



https://youtu.be/a4hdSWxq1Pw

TransCanada blocking local residents from Community Liaison Committee in Saint John, Oct 14, 2015 (12:26)



“Unlike other local industrial committees, TransCanada denies entry to local citizens,“ said Saint John resident David Thompson who was part of the group kept out of the meeting.  Mr Thompson has a long history of participating in industrial liaison meetings, and presently sits on two other industrial community liaison committees in Saint John.  “We simply wanted to sit quietly and listen to tonight’s committee meeting.”



“Open, transparent, and democratic public participation should be the operating principles of each and every community liaison committee,” added Thompson. “The National Energy Board should be required to practice this.”



 “It’s a straw horse; it’s dishonest that TransCanada will go to National Energy Board and use this Community Liaison Committee as fulfilling part of their community outreach and consultation,” remarked Colin Seeley after being refused entry.  “As a person with a proposed pipeline running across my property, I have not been contacted since it was announced that the project was being delayed for 2 years.  Meanwhile, TransCanada has been pushing ahead with work on the project such as the recent borehole testing in Red Head.”



Leslie Hillman, Red Head resident and member of Red Head Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association (RHACPA), was also disappointed to be refused entry, “TransCanada should respect the interests, the health, and the well-being of the residents and make the meeting open to the citizen observers.”



Teresa Debly, a Red Head resident whose family property has already been impacted by industrial development in the area, says, “Several residents who have considerable experience with other industrial community committees, including myself, have repeatedly requested to be accepted as Committee members, but have been denied each time by TransCanada.  Back in February, I was utterly shocked when TransCanada hired a retired police officer to prevent landowners from attending these meetings.  We are calling upon TransCanada to immediately open up their Community Liaison Committee meeting.”



A copy of this News Release and the web link to the video is also being sent to the National Energy Board. 



Media contacts: David Thompson, Saint John, 506-635-1297 and Leanne Sutton, Red Head Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association, 506-654-7857
MONCTON, NOUVEAU-BRUNSWICK – Mercredi 14 octobre 2015 - La Réserve de biosphère de Fundy (RBF) de l'UNESCO souligne la Semaine nationale des sciences et technologies (16-25 octobre 2015) avec une nouvelle ressource pédagogique sur les changements climatiques qui sensibilisera les jeunes aux enjeux environnementaux et développera leur esprit scientifique.

« Les élèves du Nouveau-Brunswick ont tendance à prendre connaissance d’importants évènements scientifiques ou d’activités scientifiques complexes en étudiant ce qui se passe aux États‑Unis ou dans les forêts tropicales du Brésil », dit la directrice générale de la Réserve de biosphère de Fundy, Megan de Graaf. «  La Réserve de biosphère de Fundy veut changer cela. Et il n’y a pas de sujet plus pertinent chez nous que les changements climatiques. »

Climate Change in Atlantic Canada (les changements climatiques au Canada atlantique) est un projet multimédia très impressionnant mettant en vedette des entrevues stimulantes avec des experts et citoyens locaux ayant beaucoup de connaissances sur le climat local, comme des apiculteurs, des agriculteurs, des conducteurs de chasse-neige, des pêcheurs, des jardiniers et des aînés des Premières Nations.

En 2011, grâce au financement du Fonds en fiducie pour l'environnement du Nouveau-Brunswick, le scientifique en conservation de la RBF, Ben Phillips, a commencé à interviewer des gens qui connaissaient bien le climat local. Il a aussi recensé et analysé des données sur le climat, comme les températures les plus élevées et les plus basses, les dates des tempêtes de neige ainsi que de la fonte des neiges, le nombre de jours de sècheresse, les pluies, leur durée et la hauteur des précipitations, et ce, afin d’expliquer les tendances de notre climat local.  Le projet est rapidement devenu une collaboration des plus dynamiques entre la Réserve de biosphère de Fundy et le professeur Ian Mauro (M. Mauro travaillait à l’époque pour la Chaire de recherche du Canada sur les dimensions humaines du changement environnemental, à l’Université Mount Allison et est maintenant professeur agrégé en géographie à l’Université de Winnipeg). En collaboration avec l’équipe du professeur Mauro, de courts documentaires ont été produits, ayant pour but de sensibiliser les gens aux réalités auxquelles font face les communautés côtières, soit des régions qui sont les premières à vivre les dangers des changements climatiques, et comment ces communautés s’adaptent pour faire face aux changements climatiques.

La Réserve de biosphère de Fundy a ensuite développé des plans de leçons pour accompagner chaque vidéo de la série, afin que ces dernières puissent être visionnées et utilisées en salle de classe dans les écoles secondaires.

Mme de Graaf explique : «  Nous avons travaillé avec des spécialistes en pédagogie pour déterminer où nos documentaires pourraient mieux faire partie des programmes scolaires au Nouveau-Brunswick et quel serait le moyen le plus efficace d’adapter ces ressources. Nous avons ainsi pu créer d’excellents plans de leçons - à la fois simples et efficaces - que les enseignants peuvent utiliser sans leur exiger trop de préparation. Nous sommes maintenant prêts à faire connaître ces ressources dans le plus d'écoles possible au Nouveau-Brunswick - ainsi que dans l'ensemble des provinces atlantiques. »

Les enseignants peuvent consulter gratuitement les ressources Climate Change in Atlantic Canada en visitant le www.climatechangeatlantic.com. Notez bien qu’elles ne sont disponibles qu’en anglais. Les ressources sont publiées sous le menu « Education » (mot de passe: climateeducation). Les écoles peuvent également communiquer avec la directrice générale de la RBF, Megan de Graaf, en envoyant un courriel à info@fundy-biosphere.ca et réserver une présentation et session de formation gratuite pour leurs enseignants afin de leur montrer comment utiliser les ressources en salles de classe. De plus amples renseignements sur le projet sont également affichés sur le site Web de la Réserve de biosphère de Fundy au fundy-biosphere.ca/fr/projets/sensibilisation.html.


At the height of the harvest season and just in time for Thanksgiving, the Conservation Council of New Brunswick is releasing its new, free BuyLocalNB™ smartphone app!

Our user-friendly app helps you find delicious and wholesome locally-grown meats and alternatives, fruits, vegetables, grain products and more — all grown or produced right here in New Brunswick! 

Looking to prepare a local-infused Thanksgiving feast with all the fixings this year? Use the BuyLocalNB™ to source your ingredients within minutes.

But it’s not just for local food! Looking for furniture with that authentic, hand-carved feel? Or are you on the look-out for a thoughtful gift idea, like the perfect hand-made artisanal craft? Maybe you want environmentally-friendly cleaning supplies or soaps? The BuyLocalNB™ directory has it all, and our new smartphone app puts everything right at your fingertips.

We also want to help you experience the local food economy through our smartphone app. Use the ‘Visit a Farm’ feature to find a local producer near you — maybe a sugar shack, apple orchard or dairy farm — and arrange a first-hand look at what they do to provide our families with fresh, wholesome, local products. You’ll also find the dozens of farmers markets and local markets adding life and vibrancy to our communities.

buylocal_ccnbbanner
The BuyLocalNB™ initiative launched at the Conservation Council in 2009. In 2011, we developed an online local food directory that became and instant favourite of local foodies, with chefs and retailers using our directory to source their products and ingredients.

We revamped our online food directory last fall, adding a user-friendly searchable database of local growers, producers and retailers.

Today, the online directory and complementary smarthphone app feature more than 280 local farmers, craftspeople and businesses, with more becoming listed each day!

The BuyLocalNB™ app is currently available as an Android download. It will be available in iOS soon. (Are you an iOS user who is anxious to try out our new app? Check out the directory at buylocalnb.ca for a preview of what the app can do!)

 Download App

Why should you shop local with our new BuyLocalNB™ app?  Easy! Supporting local food: 

  •   Supports the provincial economy and the family farm;
  •   Keeps N.B. money in N.B. communities by circulating our food dollars locally;
  •   Protects the environment by decreasing greenhouse gas emissions from transportation;
  •   Strengthens our communities by letting New Brunswickers get to know their local farmers and learn about where their food comes from; and
  •   Proactively increases our public health by providing better access to healthy nutritious food
Get the new BuyLocalNB™ smarthphone app to download local food to your table today!
La Réserve de biosphère de Fundy (RBF) de l'UNESCO a publié les résultats tant attendus de sa recherche menée sur les espèces d’arbres résistantes aux changements climatiques dans le sud du Nouveau-Brunswick.

La RBF a récemment complété une étude quant aux espèces d'arbres indigènes qui ont les meilleures chances de proliférer avec l’évolution du climat prévue au cours des 100 prochaines années, ainsi que celles qui devraient pouvoir s’adapter tant bien que mal et celles dont les nombres vont probablement diminuer. Les espèces d’arbres du nord comme les épinettes, les sapins, les peupliers et les bouleaux feront face à plus d'insectes, de maladies, de conditions météorologiques extrêmes ainsi qu’à de la concurrence avec d’autres espèces, ce qui pourrait contribuer à une croissance plus lente et à un plus haut taux de mortalité.  Par contraste, les arbres du sud comme les érables, les chênes, les pins, les hêtres, les pruches et les cerisiers auront une saison de croissance plus longue et devraient donc connaître une croissance plus rapide.

La RBF a produit un dépliant qui identifie les huit espèces « gagnantes » qui seront les mieux adaptées et donc les plus résistantes aux changements climatiques. Ce dépliant décrit les arbres et leurs conditions de croissance préférées, afin que les propriétaires de lots boisés, les forestiers, les municipalités et le grand public sachent quelles espèces d’arbres ils doivent planter et où ils peuvent les planter.

Alors que le climat évoluera et que les espèces d’arbres moins résistantes aux changements climatiques commenceront à disparaître, la composition de la forêt acadienne dans le sud du Nouveau-Brunswick (ainsi que partout dans les Maritimes) changera également. Cela signifie que la forêt, telle que nous la connaissons aujourd'hui, contiendra moins d’espèces nordiques, et probablement plus d’espèces « gagnantes ». Mais la forêt aura besoin de l'aide des résidents de la région, surtout pour planter ces espèces résistantes.

En planifiant pour les changements climatiques et en plantant des espèces d'arbres qui ont une meilleure chance de prospérer, nous pouvons contribuer à assurer qu'il y aura de beaux arbres en santé dans nos quartiers et parcs ainsi que dans les forêts qui pourront être appréciés par les générations à venir. 

Plus d'informations sur ce projet, ainsi qu'un rapport de recherche détaillé et des cartes illustrant la composition actuelle et projetée de la forêt dans la Réserve de biosphère de Fundy, sont disponibles ici: http://www.fundy-biosphere.ca/fr/home/forets.html.

 

Communiqué de presse

le 10 septembre , 2015

Fredericton – Le plan d'élargissement d'un sentier pédestre qui remonte le plus haut sommet aux Maritimes et de l'ouvrir à l'usage par la motoneige au sein du seul parc sauvage désigné au Nouveau Brunswick : tout cela inquiète fortement la Société pour la nature et les parcs du Canada, section du Nouveau-Brunswick (SNAP NB) et les Ami(e)s du Parc provincial du Mont Carleton.


« Ce n'est que récemment que nous avons appris ce projet de sentier pour le Mont Carleton, qui fait partie d'un plan d'augmenter les sentiers de motoneige dans le nord du Nouveau-Brunswick. Le gouvernement semble être prêt à accepter cette proposition sans une analyse environnementale ou sans consultation publique. On verrait donc un sentier pédestre remontant le Mont Carleton et dont la largeur serait doublée à 12 pieds et dont la voûte forestière au-dessus serait coupée à une hauteur de 12 pieds, » déclare Roberta Clowater, Directrice générale de la SNAP NB.

« Ce type de développement va fragmenter l'habitat de la faune sauvage, y compris celui de l'orignal, du polatouche (écureuil volant) et de la martre d'Amérique. Un accès continu aux motorisés sur ce sentier va probablement compacter le sol, causant un ruisellement pluvial accéléré et de l'érosion. Le surfaçage des sentiers va encourager un accès accru par les véhicules motorisés qui pourraient les mener à continuer à monter jusqu'au sommet fragile de cette montagne. Cela est complètement inapproprié dans un parc désigné à l'état naturel, » ajoute Clowater.

« Depuis plus de huit ans, les Ami(e)s du Parc provincial du Mont Carleton Inc. ont travaillé avec diligence afin de promouvoir, préserver et protéger le milieu sauvage naturel et les écosystèmes du Parc. Nous avons travaillé pour développer ce que nous pensions être une bonne relation de travail avec le Ministère du Tourisme, du Patrimoine et de la Culture. L'annonce de l'infrastructure d'un carrefour pour la motoneige est arrivée sans avertissement, ni consultation avec notre groupe, » déclare Susan Mulherin, Présidente des Ami(e)s du Parc provincial du Mont Carleton Inc.

« Les Amis se sont engagés à travailler en collaboration avec le Ministère, tout en s'assurant que l'on maintienne l'intendance du parc, et que la protection de l'environnement, de l'habitat des animaux et le patrimoine soit reflétée dans toutes les politiques et programmes. Nous sommes préoccupés que dans ce cas-ci, cela ne se produit pas. Assurément, un compromis peut être réalisé qui respecte nos aires protégées et qui répond aux intérêts des motoneigistes, » ajoute Mulherin.

Aucune discussion publique à savoir si un sentier de motoneige est compatible avec les sections les plus sauvages d'un parc à l'état naturel

Le Parc du Mont Carleton est le seul « Parc provincial à l'état sauvage » qui a été classifié ainsi dans les révisions à la Loi sur les parcs en 2014. Ces mêmes révisions mandataient le Ministère du Tourisme, du Patrimoine et de la Culture à mettre au point des Plans de gestion des ressources pour les parcs provinciaux, faisant état des utilisations récréatives qui seraient compatibles avec la conservation des aires naturelles de ce parc.

« Nous sommes très préoccupés que le Ministère pourrait considérer de prendre une décision irréversible, telle que celle-ci, avant que le Plan de gestion des ressources et le zonage connexe soient discutés publiquement et approuvés. Le Ministère est donc prêt, par le fait même, à décider que les véhicules motorisés sont permis dans les aires de conservation dans un parc à l'état naturel, ce qui va créer un précédent duquel il sera difficile d'en revenir.

« Permettre des loisirs motorisés dans l'une des parties les plus sauvages d'un parc à l'état naturel n'est pas cohérent avec la gestion normale des zones sauvages dans ce type de parc à travers le Canada et les États-Unis. Si le sentier qui monte le Mont Carleton est surfacé pour utilisation par les motoneiges, cela va empêcher son utilisation par les gens qui veulent vivre une expérience de qualité en milieu sauvage en faisant de la raquette ou du ski de fond dans cette partie du parc, » affirme Clowater.

« Il est important pour les touristes, qui sont attirés par les zones sauvages, que le marketing du Parc provincial du Mont Carleton en tant que destination de nature sauvage soit appuyé par une gestion qui soit cohérente avec l'expérience de qualité en milieu sauvage, » ajoute Clowater.

« Il s'agit d'un des premiers tests de la Loi sur les parcs révisée, que notre organisation avait applaudit comme étant un pas dans la bonne direction pour la modernisation de l'approche du Nouveau-Brunswick envers la gestion des parcs. Si le sentier est approuvé sans processus d'engagement du public ou d'analyse environnementale, selon nous le gouvernement aura échoué ce premier test de notre nouvelle législation, » explique Clowater.


La SNAP recommande que le gouvernement provincial prenne le temps d'évaluer les impacts potentiels de ce projet, d'entamer des consultations avec le public et les parties prenantes, et ensuite déterminer si le Mont Carleton est un endroit approprié pour un tel développement.

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Pour plus d’information:

Roberta Clowater, rclowater@cpaws.org; 506-452-9902



SNAP est la voix pour la vie sauvage et les parcs pour Nouveau-Brunswick. Pour plus d'information sur SNAP NB et notre travail de conservation, s'il vous plaît visitez : www.cpawsnb.org

Wolastoq Grand Council is hosting a Peace and Friendship Alliance Gathering on September 25, 26 & 27 at THE NICTAU LAKE CABINS, Mount Carleton Provincial Park.  
This historical place is where the Wolastoq and Mi’kmaq Traditional Chiefs once met to unify the nations and discuss important issues in a true democratic manner.

This will be an historical event where the two nations and their allies will reaffirm the Peace and Friendship treaties that our Ancestors signed during the 1800 century.

All members of the Wolastoq - Mi’kmaq Nations and ally groups are welcomed to attend this historical gathering.

There will be 6 cabins that will house approximately 35 Elderly people.

CAMPSITES ARE available for the younger attendees.



Items to bring

• air mattress

• bedding – sleeping bag, pillow

• toiletries

• Flashlight/HEADLIGHT

• Warm clothing/rain gear (check the weather for the area before you come)

• Plate, bowl, cup, glass, cutlery

• Towel, soap, shampoo, etc…
Meals will be provided

* RSVP by Sunday, Sept. 20th so we'll know how much food to purchase as this is a catered event.

You may do so on the Facebook page (Peace and Friendship Alliance Gathering) or through the old –fashioned way, that is, by sending an email to jlpdev@nbnet.nb.ca. Please use the following subject heading in your email: Peace and Friendship Alliance. Indicate when you'll be arriving and the number of people in your party. For additional information, please phone 506-238-5277. 


Proposed agenda
FRIDAY, SEPT 25th EVENING

- Meet-and-Greet

SATURDAY, SEPT 26th

- Sunrise (~6:30am) - Sunrise Ceremony
- Breakfast served at 8:00am

SAT. MORNING MEETING (9:00am-12:30pm)
- Opening Prayer
- Report on Confederacy Meeting held last month in Vermont
- Peace and Friendship Treaties
- Water Declaration 
- Interview Matrix (everyone writes down answers to 4 Key Questions)
- Group photograph taken in support of the Unist’ot’en blockade in BC

Lunch served at 12:30pm

SAT. AFTERNOON MEETING (1:30pm-5:00pm)
- Paris Climate Change meeting in December
- Structure & Decision-Making Process of the Peace and Friendship Alliance
- Small Hydro Projects discussion with Melvin Nash
- Discussion of potential projects to be promoted by Alliance (e.g. community energy, food self-sustainability, getting back control of our forests)
- Decide on agenda for Sunday's meeting

Supper served at 6:00pm

SAT. EVENING STORYTELLING & BRAINSTORMING

Sunset (~8:15pm) - Sunset Ceremony

SUNDAY, SEPT 27th

Breakfast served at 8:00am

9:00am - 12:30pm - SUN. MORNING MEETING
- 4 Key Questions (review flipcharts which have answers compiled from Saturday)

Lunch served at 12:30pm

1:30pm - 3:00pm - SUN. AFTERNOON MEETING








15 septembre 2015
Pour diffusion immédiate


Lancement d’un programme novateur en éducation en plein air

Moncton –L’Alliance pour l’éducation à la viabilité du Nouveau-Brunswick (AÉV) lance « Les grands penseurs se rencontrent dehors » un programme pratique de développement professionnel en plein air relié au curriculum pour les enseignants et les éducateurs.

Ce programme est le premier de son genre au Nouveau-Brunswick.  Il offre aux enseignants et aux éducateurs les compétences, les outils et les ressources nécessaires pour enseigner aux élèves en plein air affirme Raissa Marks, directrice générale du Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick.  « Ce programme va permettre aux jeunes de devenir des leadeurs dans la construction de collectivités viables grâce à leur formation et à leur sensibilisation à l’environnement. »

Les séances de l’atelier seront présentées par une équipe de professionnels de toutes les régions de la province hautement qualifiée et expérimentée qui s’est spécialisée dans l’éducation en plein air, en éducation relative à la nature et en éducation relative à l’environnement.  « Il existe plusieurs avantages à l’éducation en plein air à la fois pour les élèves et les éducateurs.  Leur santé mentale et physique et leur bienêtre s’améliorent et l’on a démontré que les comportements perturbateurs diminuaient sensiblement.  Passer plus de temps en plein air développe une relation plus forte avec la nature et favorise un mode de vie plus actif, » fait remarquer Roland Chiasson, un des formateurs de Les grands penseurs se rencontrent dehors.  « Tous les résultat d’apprentissage peuvent être réalisés en plein air avec un esprit de créativité.  Notre rôle comme formateur est de nous assurer que des méthodes d’enseignement appropriées sont utilisées pour s’occuper des obstacles appréhendés envers l’éducation en plein air et de permettre à les franchir. »

Selon Marcy Malloy, coordonnatrice de l’école communautaire de Cambridge Narrows, « Ce programme est une excellente occasion de maintenir une passerelle entre l’école et la communauté.  Les compétences acquises lors des enseignements et des apprentissages en plein air se retrouvent dans les comportements et les actions à l’extérieur de la classe.  Ce programme contribue au développement de collectivités mieux sensibilisées à l’environnement. »

Des séances de développement professionnel d’une demi-journée et d’une journée complète sont disponibles.  Les sujets abordés inclus des approches « comment » enseigner en plein air, ainsi que « quoi » enseigner en plein air.  Des subventions limitées sont disponibles.  Pour plus de renseignements sur Les grands penseurs se rencontrent dehors et pour réserver une séance veuillez visiter www.renb.ca/grandspenseurs  ou appeler 506-855-4144.

Commencez la nouvelle année scolaire du bon pied!

Personnes-ressources :

Roland Chiasson, Groupe Aster Coopérative de services environnementaux, 506-536-1260

Serge LaRochelle, Groupe de développement durable du pays de Cocagne, 506- 576-8247

Raissa Marks, Réseau environnemental du Nouveau-Brunswick, Bureau 506-855-4144, portable 506-588-2980.
The Fossils at Joggins

Workshop with Dr. Melissa Grey

Sunday September 27, 2015







The Joggins Fossil Institute is a not-for-profit charitable organization that manages the Joggins Fossil Cliffs UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Cliffs represent a time over 300 million years ago wherein club mosses could grow over 30m tall, dragonflies had a meter wing span, and millipedes were the size of humans! In this presentation, participants will learn about why the Joggins beach is such a special place and what the Institute does to foster earth history education and conservation.




Dr. Melissa Grey is a palaeontologist with a background in Biology and Zoology. She obtained her doctorate in Geological Sciences at the University of British Columbia, her Masters in Zoology from the University of Guelph and her Bachelors in Biology from Acadia University. She has lived and worked across Canada, but is happy to be back in her home province studying fossils.




Sunday September 27, 1:00 to 3:00 pm

Tankville School, 1665 Elmwood Dr., Moncton

Registration with Judi Berry-Steeves at jbsteeve@nbnet.nb.ca or phone Judi at 387-4778.

$8 payable at the door.

All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not.




FREDERICTON — On Wednesday, Sept. 2, Donald Arseneault, Minister of Energy and Mines, released the draft regulation to allow small-scale renewable energy generation projects in New Brunswick.

The regulation is available online for 30 days of public input.

Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, issued the following statement:

“I’m pleased to see the Minister release this new regulation, following so closely on the heels of the Premier’s announcement of new strong targets to reduce carbon pollution from N.B. sources. Providing the means and the market for renewable energy projects here at home is a welcomed and sensible action.

I encourage the leaders in environmental and renewable industries and local champions of projects that protect their communities to take a look at this package and submit their comments.”

The regulation sets out explicit policies devoted to the task of making sure N.B. gets at least 40 per cent of its electricity from clean renewable sources.

It sets out the criteria for co-ops, First Nations, non-profit groups and local communities to put on their thinking caps about how they can lead the charge to reduce carbon pollution by installing solar, wind, and tidal technologies.

The regulation also requires NB Power to report its progress every year from now to 2020 in a transparent and public manner.

Over the past five years, solar-module costs have dropped by 73 per cent. According to the International Renewable Energy Agency, there are 2.5 million people working in solar PV jobs worldwide. In Canada, the number of people working in the renewable energy industry rose by 37 per cent between 2009 and 2013, and the sector now employs more Canadians than the oil sands in Alberta.

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For more information or to arrange an interview, contact: Jon MacNeill, Communications Officer | 458-8747 | 261-1353 | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca
(FREDERICTON) – Une coalition de 22 groupes communautaires et environnementaux a fait parvenir aujourd’hui par courrier recommandé une lettre rédigée conjointement à TransCanada, à l’Office national de l’énergie et aux responsables gouvernementaux appropriés au niveau fédéral, provincial et municipal.

La coalition a pris connaissance d’un plan de travail de six pages montrant que TransCanada est à quelques jours de commencer à creuser des puits d’exploration au large de Red Head, au Nouveau-Brunswick, dans la baie de Fundy. Une des grandes barges exigées pour le travail est déjà en train d’être positionnée. 

« TransCanada n’a pas informé les résidents du quartier Red Head à Saint John, situé au bout de la ligne, a déclaré Lynaya Astephen, porte-parole de la Red Head-Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association. Aucune analyse de puits ou de fondations n’a eu lieu. C’est aussi une période intense pour les oiseaux migratoires et la baleine noire, une espèce menacée. L’entreprise manque beaucoup de transparence ».

« Aucun avis de ces travaux imminents n’a été donné à notre peuple, a confirmé Ron Tremblay, porte-parole du Grand Conseil de Wolastoq. En tant que membre du Grand Conseil de Wolastoq et de la nation Wolastoq, je tiens fermement à protéger nos terres, notre eau et notre air. La zone où est prévu le forage d’exploration se trouve sur notre terre et notre rivage traditionnels, là où notre peuple a pêché, a cueilli et s’est épanoui grâce à l’abondance de nourriture et de plantes médicinales. Si d’autres dommages sont causés, cela ne fera qu’aggraver la destruction du territoire traditionnel de la nation Wolastoq. Je m’oppose fortement à toute exploration et à toute catastrophe industrielle sur nos terres ancestrales ».  

« Le processus réglementaire et de consultation semble absent, a déclaré Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, coprésidente sortante et membre du Conseil des Canadiens, section de Fredericton. Si TransCanada n’a pas suivi la diligence voulue auprès de tous les organismes gouvernements pertinents, voilà qui est un sérieux avertissement sur la façon dont le projet Énergie Est pourrait être mené ».

Dans leur déclaration commune, les 22 groupes exhortent TransCanada et les organismes publics appropriés à agir immédiatement. « Étant donné le manque de consultation et la longue liste des préoccupations soulevées, nous demandons que tous les travaux reliés au forage d’exploration cessent jusqu’à ce qu’il soit donné suite à ces préoccupations. Pourquoi TransCanada procéderait-elle à de tels travaux alors que les oiseaux migratoires et les baleines fréquentent la baie de Fundy en plus grand nombre en août et en septembre? »

Lien vers lettre conjointe
(Fredericton, NB) The Nature Trust of New Brunswick, in partnership with the Office of the Lieutenant-Governor of New Brunswick, is seeking nominations for the 2015 Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation. This award is presented annually to an individual or an organization who has made a difference in the field of conservation in the province of New Brunswick through volunteerism, donation of land, stewardship, or other means. Nomination forms can be accessed here, and can be submitted now until Monday, Aug. 31. The Honourable Jocelyne Roy Vienneau, Lieutenant-Governor of New Brunswick, will present the award at a ceremony taking place at Government House on Thursday, Nov. 25. Nominations are to be submitted to Communications Coordinator Jessica Bradford at communications@ntnb.org.

The award was created to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Nature Trust of New Brunswick and its ongoing efforts to preserve ecologically significant areas within the province. Nominees must fulfill at least one of several requirements for evaluation for the award, including contribution to conservation efforts over time, involvement as a past or present volunteer, steward and/or member of the Nature Trust or other conservation organization, or involvement as a corporate or community partner of the Nature Trust or other conservation organization. The nominations may also be made as a posthumous recognition of an individual’s significant contributions to conservation over time. 

Dr. Don Floyd represents the Atlantic Regional Board of the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) as one of the members of the award’s selection committee. Floyd notes the importance of acknowledging the commendable work of conservationists in the province:

“The Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation is an important way to recognize and give thanks to conservationists in New Brunswick,” says Floyd. “In addition to organizations like NCC and the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, there are many other conservation-minded groups and individuals who are making a difference in their communities to preserve natural landscapes for the future,” says Floyd. “This award is a way to recognize and give thanks to those who are leaving legacies to be enjoyed for generations to come.”

The Meduxnekeag River Association was the recipient of the award in 2013, recognizing the difference the organization has made in the Meduxnekeag river valley since 1995 and for the ongoing commitment to acquiring and protecting land in the area for present and future generations. 

 “The Nature Trust of New Brunswick's recognition of conservation in New Brunswick via the Lieutenant-Governor’s Award was gratefully received by the Meduxnekeag River Association Inc. in 2013,” says Stephen Wilson, President of the Meduxnekeag River Association. “Our continued engagement with the Nature Trust of New Brunswick and the many others that make our conservation efforts possible is much appreciated, and continues to raise the profile of the unique habitats of the Meduxnekeag region.” 

The Lieutenant-Governor’s Award for Excellence in Land Conservation provides an opportunity to recognize the dedication and long-term contributions of environmental conservationists in the province. The Nature Trust of New Brunswick thanks its partners in the award selection committee, including the Honourable Jocelyne Roy Vienneau, the Atlantic Regional Board of the Nature Conservancy of Canada, the New Brunswick Minister of Natural Resources, the Canadian Wildlife Service, and Angee Acquin, First Nations representative. 

About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick

Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a non-profit conservation organization dedicated to preserving the province’s ecologically significant landscapes. To date, the Nature Trust has conserved over 6,000 acres (2,400 hectares) in more than 40 beautiful and diverse nature preserves in New Brunswick. For more information, visit www.naturetrust.nb.ca.

TELEGRAPH-JOURNAL July 22/2015



Premiers’ energy strategy lacking  

The recent premiers’ conference in Newfoundland illustrates how firmly the oil and gas industry has our politicians in its pocket.   Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall, who hopes to turn Saskatchewan into another tarsands province, was the most obvious. The irony is that he is presiding over a province consumed by wildfires which are a direct result of climate change which is a direct result of our use of fossil fuels. And he wants to produce more?   Climate change was given lip service, but there were no definite commitments.   This is insanity. If our premiers had our welfare at heart, they would be doing all in their power to support, encourage and subsidize renewable energy, instead of giving enormous taxpayer subsidies to the oil and gas industry. Many studies also prove that renewable energy -- solar, wind, water – would create many more jobs than the highly subsidized oil and gas industry.   A fossil fuel future guarantees chaotic weather patterns leading to crop losses, farmer bankruptcies, homeowner disasters, food scarcities, water shortages and health catastrophes. The pollution of rivers and waterways -- such as the July 17 spill of five million litres of tarsands bitumen at Fort MacMurray and exploding tarsands oil trains, such as in Lac Megantic, contribute to a general breakdown of all ecosystem services that make life on Earth possible.   I don’t want to believe these premiers are stupid -- but there’s only one alternative -- -that they have sold out.   Mary de La Valette   Porter Cove


Fredericton – In its latest annual report released in advance of Canada Parks Day, the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) is calling Canada out for falling behind most other countries in protecting its land and fresh water.  CPAWS’ 2015 report, Protecting Canada: Is it in our nature?, assesses whether our governments are on track to meet their collective international commitment to protect at least 17% of our land and fresh water by 2020, and to improve the quality of our protected areas.
“Based on our assessment of progress since Canada endorsed the UN Convention on Biological Diversity 10-year plan in 2010, it would take us 50 years from today, not five, to meet our commitment to protect at least 17% of our land and fresh water. And 17% is only the next step we need to take towards protecting at least half to ensure Canada continues to have healthy, functioning ecosystems,” says Alison Woodley, national director of CPAWS’ parks program.
“In New Brunswick, we are particularly worried that New Brunswick is so far behind most of the other provinces in Canada, there is no plan in place to catch up, and no commitment to add any new protected areas,” says Roberta Clowater, Executive Director of CPAWS New Brunswick.
“Furthermore, the opportunities for creating more protected areas in the future are quickly being foreclosed due to the province’s new Crown Forestry strategy. There will be fewer and fewer wild forest options left to add to the protected areas systems over time.”

Slow to no progress since 2011

CPAWS found that the current percentage of lands and inland waters protected varies dramatically across Canada, ranging from just under three percent in Prince Edward Island, to more than 15% in British Columbia.  Since 2011, the area protected in Alberta, Newfoundland and Labrador and the Yukon Territory has not grown at all, and all other provinces have increased protection by less than 2%. B.C.’s progress is undermined by its 2014 Parks Act amendments that allow industrial research in parks and boundary changes to accommodate pipelines and logging.

Reasons for optimism

“Some of Canada’s provinces and territories and Indigenous communities are making impressive efforts to advance protected areas. Quebec and Ontario have committed to protecting half of their northern territories, although implementation of these commitments is very slow. Nova Scotia has ramped up efforts and appears to be on track to reach 14% protection, Manitoba has committed to creating 15 new parks and protected areas and to expanding others, and Alberta, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut all have land use planning processes underway that could lead to new, large protected areas,” says Woodley.

At the federal level, a large new national park called Qausuittuq in Nunavut (11,000 km2) was just finalized in June, and two more could be announced within the next year. These include an area called Thaidene Nene around the East Arm of Great Slave Lake, NWT, where approximately 30,000 km2 could become a combined national and territorial park shortly. Similarly, the process for finalizing the 10,700 km2 Mealy Mountains National Park Reserve in Labrador is nearing completion, with an adjacent 3,000 km2 provincial park still at the early stages of establishment.
Local Indigenous communities are playing a significant leadership role and partnering with federal, provincial, and/or territorial governments to protect many of these large areas.
CPAWS calculates that if existing plans for creating new protected areas were implemented, along with other commitments for which specific sites have not yet been confirmed, Canada could meet its obligation to reach 17% protection by 2020.


Government leadership needed In New Brunswick

Over the past 20 years, New Brunswick has only moved from 1.3% to 4.7% of the province in permanently and legally designated protected areas.
“We’re looking for New Brunswick to take on leadership to help meet Canada’s 2020 protected area commitments. To start, the New Brunswick government needs to revise the Crown Forestry Strategy to allow space for new forested protected areas across the province, and needs to commit to an ambitious  plan to establish new protected areas around ecologically important forests, coastal shores, cliffs, wetlands and river headwaters. We cannot maintain the current slow pace of protection, because we are losing opportunities to protect our wild nature at an even faster rate,” says Roberta Clowater.

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View executive summary and full report at: http://cpaws.org/uploads/CPAWS_Parks_Report_2015-Single_Page.pdf
For interviews, contact: Roberta Clowater, rclowater@cpaws.org; phone: 506-452-9902
Founded in 1963, CPAWS is Canada’s only nationwide charity dedicated solely to protecting our public land and water, and ensuring our parks are managed to protect the nature within.

Pour diffusion immédiate

le 2 juillet 2015

16 Groupes confirment leur soutien à l’Évènement sur le Climat à Fredericton dans le cadre de la Marche pour les emplois, la justice et le climat qui aura lieu dans les villes canadiennes le 4 juillet

Fredericton – Une coalition de 16 groupes communautaires et environnementaux a émis une déclaration commune d’appui à la « Marche pour les emplois, la justice et le climat » qui aura lieu ce samedi 4 juillet, de 13 heures à 13 h 45 au centre-ville de Fredericton au Nouveau-Brunswick.

Toute la population est invitée à se rencontrer en face de l’édifice de l’Assemblée législative au 706, rue Queen à Fredericton à 13 heures. Une courte marche aura lieu jusqu’à la passerelle du pont du chemin de fer pour une série de photos avec le fleuve Saint-Jean (Wolastoq) à l’arrière-plan. Tout le monde y trouvera de nombreuses bannières et plusieurs panneaux ROUGE « EmploisJusticeClimatActions. » Une belle occasion de prendre des photos sur le pont pour démontrer notre appui à une juste transition vers un avenir énergétique propre.

Fredericton se joindra à des collectivités de toutes les régions canadiennes où se dérouleront des manifestations pour le climat dont, Saint-Jean, Annapolis Valley, Halifax, la ville de Québec, Lac Mégantic, Hudson-Oka, Thunder Bay, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Nelson et Vancouver. Le weekend va culminer dans un grand rassemblement planifié pour le lendemain 5 juillet à Toronto avec la participation de leadeurs bien connus des syndicats, des communautés indigènes et des groupes de cession d’actifs.

Dans leur déclaration conjointe, les 16 groupes ont demandé instamment à nos leadeurs politiques d’agir pour le climat, « Nous nous joignons aux collectivités qui se tiennent debout devant les oléoducs des sables bitumineux et avec les organisateurs du désinvestissement des étudiants qui se battent pour un avenir climatique sécuritaire. Nous nous unissons aux travailleurs mis à pied par milliers des champs de pétrole de l’Alberta et aux communautés indigènes qui travaillent pour construire des solutions énergétiques propres sur les premières lignes de l’extraction. »

L’organisation internationale de cession d’actifs 350.org coordonne et fait la promotion d’évènements partout au Canada. Sur son site Web, 350.org souligne l’évènement de Fredericton en disant : « À Fredericton, à la passerelle qui domine le fleuve Saint-Jean/Wolastoq, les gens vont se réunir pour démontrer qu’ils sont prêts pour une économie qui travaille pour les gens. » Et 350.org souligne aussi que : « Ces rassemblements tentent de suivre la direction des communautés des Premières nations qui sont aux premières lignes de l’extraction des carburants fossiles et de la crise climatique. »

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Contact : Maggie Connell, Conseil des Canadiens- Chapitre de Fredericton, (506) 459-8081

Voir la déclaration complète des 16 groupes

Voir l’article '4 Reasons to Get Excited about July 4th'

Page de l'évènement sur Facebook: March for Jobs, Justice & the Climate (FREDERICTON)

Despite the declaration in last Saturday’s Telegraph Journal, there are several folks willing to declare that Mount Carleton is not the toughest trail to climb in Mount Carleton Park. The trail up Mount Sagamook is definitely a much more challenging hiking trail. The trail is steep and rocky for most of the distance, if you hike up the right hand trail to the outcrops that are most often featured in photos of the park.

On Friday, June 5th a group of hikers consisting NB Parks staff, a Friends of Mount Carleton representative and three members of a group named A for Adventure. “A for Adventure is all about inspiring people to get outdoors and experience adventure.” The members of the group endeavour to go on adventures, large and small, and by taking their message to the media, they hope to encourage others to get outside.

In August 2013, Jan LaPierre and Graham Carter had just finished a 200 km plus kayak paddle to Cape Sable Island. “Paddle to Sable” raised funds and awareness to create a camp for kids struggling with mental health issues at Brigadoon Village. “

On the trip home from their epic paddle, Jan began to recite a poem he was thinking up. He asked his friends if they could put together an adventure children’s book. They were all so enthused with the concept, that they stopped the car and went on a hike to discuss the idea. On that hike a book was born.

“A is for adventure, as you will come to see.
Like hiking or biking or climbing a tree,

Or taking a plane to a far away land,

Or a trip to the beach to play in the sand. “

The idea took flight and currently their group includes not only Jan LaPierre and Chris Surrette, but a recent addition is photographer Brad Sayeau. Christopher Hoyt agreed to illustrate their book, “A is for Adventure”, which is due out this month.

Meanwhile the group are taking in as many adventures as they can, in the hopes of encouraging folks young and old to get outside and see and experience the world around them. Many of their adventures are in our parks and last week they came to Mount Carleton Park, where they helped to paddle a large canoe on Little Nictau Lake and climbed Mount Sagamook. They agreed that the challenging climb was well worth the effort, once they took in the panoramic view offered from the iconic rock outcrops at the top of Sagamook. Despite the threat of rain, it held off until the group reached the parking lot at the foot of Mount Sagamook, insuring that all the camera gear was kept safely dry.

When asked for his opinion of Mount Carleton Park, Jan LaPierre summed up his experience there by saying;”Mount Carleton Park is one of those places that can’t be summed up in words. And I’m so grateful for that. It’s a place that needs to be seen, but more importantly, felt. Where, because of its authentic beauty you can” let go.”

Jan feels so passionately about his experiences in the park, that since his trip last Friday he has been talking about the park nonstop, to anyone who will listen. Jan’s only regret is that he had not come to the park sooner, but a return trip to the park is definitely in his near future.
A for Adventure advocates for a fitter population by declaring; “Get outside and do any kind of adventure, large or small. Adventure can be right in your own backyard.”
You may soon log on to their Facebook and website, to access more information and photos taken on their trip to Mount Carleton Park.

John Connell Bernadette Michaud Ian Smith and Brigitte Donald from NB Parks
John Connell, Bernadette Michaud, Ian Smith and Brigitte Clavette
from NB Parks
Labrador tea
Labrador tea
L R John Connell Jan LaPierre Chris Surette Brad SayeauIan Smith Brigitte Clavette Susan Mulherin
L-R John Connell, Jan LaPierre, Chris Surette, Brad Sayeau,Ian Smith,
Brigitte Clavette, Susan Mulherin
Little Nictau Lake
Little Nictau Lake
Nature Paddle
Paddle
Outlook on Mount Sagamook
Outlook on Mount Sagamook
Purple trilliums on the trail
Purple trilliums on the trail
Stunted birch near the top of Mount Sagamook
Stunted birch near the top of Mount Sagamook
Sumi on the summit
Sumi on the summit
Top of the Mount Sagamook Trail
Top of the Mount Sagamook Trail
How do you stop a pipeline when one family owns both the oil and the media?

By: Lynaya Astephen, member of Red Head Anthony's Cove Preservation Association
Read the original here

Pipeline opponent’s op-ed rejected by Irving-owned newspaper in New Brunswick

Editors’ note: Saint John’s Telegraph-Journal refused to publish this op-ed, written by a local resident to explain why over 700 people gathered on the shores of the Bay of Fundy this past Saturday to oppose Energy East, TransCanada’s proposed 1.1 million barrel per day pipeline. Like nearly all print media in the province of New Brunswick, the Telegraph-Journal is owned by the Irving family, whose company, Irving Oil, has partnered with TransCanada to build a maritime export terminal for the proposed Energy East pipeline.

I am a proud resident of Red Head, Saint John, a small rural community with quiet roads and beautiful coastal views.

TransCanada is proposing a 1.1 million barrel per day pipeline from Alberta to Saint John. After travelling almost the entire length of the country, it would end at a new deep water port on the Bay of Fundy. The Energy East project also includes a massive tank “farm” to store the oil that would be loaded onto waiting ships — across the street from my home.

Why do I oppose Energy East?

I’m worried about the air we breathe.

Saint John is highly industrialized, and residents are already exposed to increased health risks from air pollution, not to mention the oil smells near Irving’s new rail facility. We have, among other industries, Irving Oil’s export terminal and the Canaport LNG terminal. We have 38 times the industrial pollution of Fredericton and 243 times that of Moncton. A recent study found lung cancer rates 30 per cent higher in Saint John than in either of these communities. The health experts I’ve spoken to say that existing regulations for air pollution as inadequate. Yet TransCanada says air pollution from Energy East would not be significant.

I’m worried about the prospect of a spill or fire at the tank storage farm.

The deputy fire chief in Burnaby, B.C., has issued a scathing report on the risks presented by a similar oil tank storage facility on the West Coast. The chief warned that a fire at the expanded tank farm could create a “nightmare scenario” resulting in a massive urban evacuation.

I am having trouble trusting TransCanada and Irving Oil. Despite several requests, TransCanada has refused to hold a public meeting with Red Head residents with an open question-and-answer period.

recent Reuters investigation of the New Brunswick Department of Energy found that since 2012, Irving’s export terminal has experienced at least 19 accidents classified as “environmental emergencies.” In 2013, Irving received a formal warning for taking more than a day to report a storage tank leak at the Canaport facility.

According to National Energy Board statistics, TransCanada has had more pipeline ruptures than any other company in Canada. The company’s electronic monitoring equipment won’t even detect a spill that is less than 1.5 per cent of the pipeline’s capacity. This means over 2 million litres can spill before anyone is alerted.

My concerns don’t stop at the end of my driveway.

The Energy East project would see 115 oil tankers in the Bay of Fundy — and potentially far more now that the Cacouna, Quebec, port has been cancelled. The endangered North Atlantic right whales in the Bay of Fundy are already vulnerable to ship strikes and low-frequency ship noise, both of which Energy East threatens to worsen. Moving in and out of port for export, Energy East tankers would carry 1 to 2 million barrels of oil each.

Energy East would ship diluted bitumen from the tar sands. Sticky and heavy, bitumen from Alberta’s tar sands separated from the diluents (chemicals) and sunk in Michigan’s Kalamazoo River during a pipeline spill in 2010. This cost Enbridge more than $1 billion to clean up, yet submerged oil remains on the river bed to this day.

One federal study found diluted bitumen sunk and formed “tar balls” in marine conditions similar to the Bay of Fundy. A major spill that occurs during loading of the tankers or when the tankers are leaving wouldn’t just threaten whales. It could be a serious blow for all ocean-dependent economies and jobs.

A draft federal report accessed through freedom of information admits that not enough is known about the potential toxic effects of tar sands crude in our waterways. Energy East passes through or comes near more than 300 waterways, including at least six of the St. John River’s main tributaries.

I want to do my part in helping protect future generations.

The Energy East pipeline would create more climate pollution than any single Atlantic province.

A recent scientific report says 85 per cent of Canada’s tar sands need to stay in the ground if we are to avoid the worst of climate change. Industry wants to double production by 2030 and will pursue both pipeline and rail expansion to export their product. Filling the Energy East pipeline would allow a close to 40 per cent increase in tar sands production.

We can do better. This export pipeline puts so much at risk for such short-term benefit. There is much more at stake than profit.

Biologist Rod Cumberland sent this letter to all members of the NB Legislative Assembly

Dear NBMLA:

I have just reviewed the 323 page Health Canada re-assessment of glyphosate. It was due in 2014 but was completed April 13, 2015.

Rather than simply take whatever comes out of this process at face value, I believe you need to be informed of the pitfalls of this present review.

It is VERY evident that there are huge problems with this process and I would like to make you aware of them before we blindly assume that this review is unbiased and "scientific". Please allow me to elaborate on my two main shortfalls of this review:

First - There is an obvious lack of relevant research; and
(Without recent and relevant research that CLEARLY reveals numerous health and wildlife hazards associated with glyphosate, the assumptions that it is safe are erroneous).

Second - the inclusion of the economic and social benefits of glyphosate.
This document presumes to use “a science-based approach”, therefore this is no place for economic and social benefits that have little relevance when considering the science behind the impacts and safety of a compound to human health.
The shortcomings of this review are as follows:

1. The Health Canada review of glyphosate has not considered the actual product sprayed and used across Canada with the adjuvants and emulsifiers that make it the effective product it is – If glyphosate was used by itself for the benefits purported in both agriculture and forest based applications, then a review considering the impacts of glyphosate alone may be appropriate. However, the effectiveness of this compound is only possible in formulation. It is therefore the FORMULATION that must be considered in the review of glyphosate because indeed, this is what is sprayed across the country, not glyphosate alone.

2. This review has not included volumes of recent worldwide literature that reveals huge issues with glyphosate in formulation. In any scientific review, literature review or published paper, the strength of the paper is only as relevant as the research upon which it is based. In other words, using outdated and short-term studies on a compound that has been continually modified and that has long term consequences is either knowingly biasing the process and results, or worse, pleading ignorance to the advancement of science and emerging research. Neither is appropriate in this re-evaluation and this process relies on outdated, short-term research when long term and relevant research is readily available that shows markedly different results than they report.

For example, 78% of all industry-supplied research is between 10 and 40 years outdated. Further, the majority of these (a full 80%) are more than 15 years removed from currently published material. I forwarded (and have appended here) over 30 papers published within the past 10 years on glyphosate and glyphosate formulations that suggest markedly different results and reveal glyphosate and its formulations are the cause of many modern human diseases, are carcinogenic and are the cause of cell malformations in numerous types of human and animal cells, but most problematic are its problems associated with gastrointestinal systems and reproductive cells specifically. And the review doesn’t even begin to address all the relevant research on GMO’s and their problems.

Discouragingly, but likely explanatory to the present proposed conclusion is that a mere 9% of the papers used in the review are recent publications. I do not understand on such a controversial topic as glyphosate use and it’s proven health concerns why more effort was not expended to find current research from around the globe to give a much better review of this chemical. It would definitely impact this assessment. This very biased approach is clearly covered in Antoniou et.al 2012.

I would also like to comment on several specific concerns within the document:

a) On page 3 it states that “pesticides are registered for use in Canada only if the level of exposure does not cause any harmful effects”. Therefore, if there is current research that DOES show harmful effects, particularly of a chemical in the state it is sprayed in throughout the country, by their own admission it MUST NOT recommend it for use. I contend that the attached research is clear evidence that the decision must be reversed.

b) Glyphosate formulations pose negligible risk to freshwater fish and amphibians. This conclusion has been proven incorrect by modern research (Annett et.al 2014, Vera et.al 2010). It shows harmful effects and would invoke a nation-wide ban on the use of glyphosate.

c) Under 3.1 it is stated that studies were available to satisfy data requirements, yet it is not specified what these requirements are, nor what studies are applicable, when they were done, etc. to justify these statement. This is poor science and format for a review document with the intent of public review, unless of course the intent is to limit the amount of intelligent and scientific comment.

d) Cardiovascular malformations are mentioned on page 14 as serious side effects in one study (again, no specifics) but regardless, how can it be concluded that glyphosate is safe? Once again, these results disagree with the suggestion that glyphosate “does not cause harmful effects” and would rather corroborate modern research linking glyphosate and its formulations to a huge list of environmental, human and wildlife ill effects (research attached).

e) Dietary exposure can be mitigated by changes in use patterns. This begs two questions – if there are no harmful effects, why suggest mitigation? Next, mitigation is suggested, this implies harmful effects. More Problems are that this document does not suggest how these mitigative steps will be enforced to ensure compliance. Therefore, it is a hollow recommendation that affords NO protection of health.

f) On page 29 “major incidents of human exposure” are reported, however, no qualification is provided for the word “major”. Further, these exposures to “Highly toxic ingredients” or the adjuvants and emulsifiers I suggest MUST be considered. This again highlights that some of their research, along with most modern research, that glyphosate in formulation is HIGHLY TOXIC. Back to point 1 – how can such a review conclude glyphosate does not cause harmful effects unless on the grounds of semantics by separating glyphosate from its formulations, a formulation that is rarely used commercially??

g) On page 30 they reference common incidents in wild animals where these formulations cause death in wildlife. Once again, totally contradicting statements and research that suggests this assessment is incorrect and will jeopardize human, wildlife and environmental health and safety. How could a toxic substance causing death NOT warrant changes in labels at the least, or more responsibly a ban on the product?

h) The statement “Glyphosate is rarely detected in drinking water” proves the weakness and ignorance of the process and data. I include papers that show glyphosate, even at residual levels, shows up in soil, water, human urine, cattle tissue, other cells, etc. Therefore, based on modern research the present suggested evaluation must be reconsidered in light of science.

i) You assume “risk to mammals is low”. Again, research from Montana, Australia, Denmark, Germany and Egypt directly linked malformations in ungulates to the mineral chelating effect that glyphosate has and the resulting mineral deficiencies in their food and systems from the use of glyphosate; More erroneous data, more erroneous conclusions.

j) This review states there is no reproductive risk to glyphosate. Current research again proves this point outdated and erroneous (see attached research).

k) This review states glyphosate has no effect on fish. The appended research proves that herbicides are endocrine disruptors (which glyphosate is) and federal research scientists have proven they cause many problems in fish including high at-sea mortality.

l) Quite disturbing is the assertion on page 42 that one of the benefits of glyphosate is its ability to be more effective when combined with other chemicals. It is hypocritical to in one breath dismiss the impacts of glyphosate in formation because only the compound glyphosate is being reviewed, yet when it’s convenient, this very argument is used to weigh the scales in favour of the compound.

m) The wordsmithing in the section referencing OECD countries not prohibiting ALL uses of glyphosate is correct only grammatically. For the record, there are municipalities within Canada, Provinces within Canada and many countries that have prohibited the use of glyphosate (Columbia and Holland in the past few weeks) due to the health hazards and risks you purport are not present. Interesting play on words, but in no way reflects reality and concerns around this compound. Statements like these drip with bias, and ignorance – whether purposeful or not – to current research.

n) Maximum levels in foods – this raises another point that MUST be considered by Health Canada. In light of emerging research and glyphosates link to modern disease, it is Health Canada’s responsibility to request labels on all foods that have been sprayed at one point or another in the growth process by glyphosate so the public can protect themselves from ingestion of this substance. If the use of this toxic chemical is not revoked, at the very least there must be a means by which the public can make informed decisions on the purchase of these contaminated foods.

o) If the only change from Health Canada’s former review of glyphosate is several labeling changes, how does Health Canada ensure these label instructions are followed? What are the penalties for failure to heed them? Once again, this is a broken system and in NO WAY protects the health and welfare of humans, wildlife or the environment. These are serious deficiencies in this review and therefore, we cannot be expected to take this re-evaluation seriously.

In closing, I was very disappointed with this re-assessment. This appears another bureaucratic process that only provides lip service and opportunity for input just to say it was done. I would hope and expect that the elected politicians of New Brunswick would take these comments seriously and ensure such a biased and ill-informed review in light of applicable and relevant literature of glyphosate’s great risk to public health, wildlife health and the environment would step up and demand a more rigorous approach.

If NB companies, or the BNBDNR, NBAFA or other NB departments stand behind this biased and flawed review, you will be knowingly allowing the poisoning of New Brunswickers.

In all sincerity,
Rod E. Cumberland, CWB

Water Declaration

Peace and Friendship Alliance, Red Head 2015

 

We, the members of the Alliance, recognize the Nation-to-Nation Peace and Friendship Treaties as the basis of our common ground, defining our responsibilities to the water and to each other, down through the generations.

 

We affirm that Water is the dynamic and creative element that sustains all life. Water moves and flows through deep aquifers, springs, bogs, brooks, marshes, lakes, rivers and into the ocean tides throughout Wabanaki territory, to be drawn up into the clouds and fall as rain, returning to the land.

 

In this constant ebb & flow, Water nourishes & cleanses the entire world. It makes up who we are, as well as the other living beings. We live, grow, play, work, wash, cook, drink, rest, pray and celebrate with the waters. What we do to the Water, we do to ourselves.

 

Water is limited, and it is vulnerable. It needs to be protected, and shared freely and fairly. Water is not a commodity or merely a resource. It is a unique condition, a life giver, a right, and water is a dynamic being with a creative power of its own unlike any other in the natural world, and the human family.

 

We see the destruction of the environment as the destruction of ourselves. We see that any assault on the good and well-being of our relations in the natural world, upon our lands and our waters as an act of aggression against us.

 

Today, we recognize and resist the extensive abuses to Water that resource industries and governments are unleashing, directly assaulting Water.

 

These threats include:

fracking tar sands pipelines mining industrial wastewater dumping privatizing water services clear cut & spraying in the forest industrial farming river dams coastal inundation and flash flooding from severe storms and climate change nuclear power generation salmon farm mismanagement government inaction

 

These abuses render water toxic, diverted, substandard, unreliable and unavailable. All of these assaults on Water are abusive to the web of life which our societies are embedded in and depend upon to survive and thrive for the next seven generations. Our children and grandchildren deserve better and need to be protected from harm.

 

The Peace and Friendship Alliance opposes these abuses. We are committed to restoring balance to our relationship with the water, thereby renewing our treaty responsibilities to each other as distinct Nations. When we care for the water, we care for each other.

 

We will care for the water by building a sustainable economy that rapidly transitions away from fossil-fuels to renewables, restores our forests, reduces the carbon footprint, decentralizes energy supply, and builds food security through a regional biodiverse farming sector.

 

We call on governments to amend our laws and regulations to accommodate the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. lThese laws and regulations must take into account sovereign aboriginal title of Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet), Passamaquoddy and Mi’kmaq, involving their inherent and inalienable rights, including among others their right to exercise free, prior, and informed consent and their right to participate in economic development that affects the waters in their lands. These laws and regulations must also take into account the balance of interests involving the farming sector, forestry sector, renewable energy sector, manufacturing sector, as well as health services and tourism industries among others.

 

We the Alliance invite you to join in our movement – our shared consciousness - to reconnect in a sacred manner to the natural world. Our Nations will stand shoulder-to- shoulder to protect the water and secure a future for our children and our grandchildren.

 

This Water Declaration is declared in Peace and Friendship, on the 30th of May, 2015, at the mouth of the Wolastoq (Saint John River) and the shore of the Bay of Fundy.

 

The Peace and Friendship Alliance

woliwon - wela’lin - thank you - merci

 

Visit http://www.noenergyeastnb.ca/

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MEDIA RELEASE

Provinces take lead on climate protection

FREDERICTON — The declaration from premiers at the Quebec Summit on Climate Change puts momentum behind the effort to protect our climate and reduce carbon pollution, says the Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

Yesterday the premiers released a declaration containing several commitments for greater cooperation and meaningful action to curb climate change. The 12-point declaration included commitments from premiers to transition to a lower-carbon economy, noting that could involve carbon pricing, and putting policies in place to reduce climate change-causing pollution, such as increasing energy efficiency and conservation and using clean and renewable energy.

“Tuesday’s announcement from our premiers is the type of leadership on climate that Canadians have been looking for,” said Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council. "Of course, now they have to take action at home to reduce pollution — actions that their citizens support and will create jobs."

In the declaration, the premiers said they recognize the cost of inaction is greater than the cost of acting on climate protection, and that the fight against climate change would create sustainable, long-term jobs, especially in areas such as renewable energy and energy efficiency.

The document comes just one day after Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne announced her province would enter into a cap and trade system with Quebec and California as a means to control carbon pollution, and following this weekend’s massive march in Quebec City where 25,000 people called on leaders to act now on climate protection.

“To me, this is our premiers saying to the Canadian people: message received. Our provinces are now empowered to act, and we expect that they will,” added Corbett, who attended the climate march and presented at an Act On Climate Forum in Quebec City over the weekend.

Corbett said the commitments contained in the declaration meant good things for New Brunswick, noting efforts to reduce carbon pollution - such as investments in energy conservation, renewable energy projects, putting a price on carbon and phasing out coal - will create good jobs for New Brunswickers and make our communities healthier places to live.

The climate summit was hosted in Quebec City and attended by eight provincial premiers, including New Brunswick Premier Brian Gallant. Gallant led a New Brunswick delegation which included Environment and Local Government Minister Brian Kenny and Fredericton South MLA David Coon.

Read the declaration from premiers.
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MEDIA RELEASE


FREDERICTON — Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, will talk about ways governments can protect our climate while creating prosperous communities during the Act on Climate Forum in Quebec City this weekend.

Corbett is one of several notable speakers participating in the Act on Climate Forum on Sunday, April 12 in Quebec City. The forum follows the Act on Climate March being organized on April 11, when Canadians from coast-to-coast will gather to show their support for government action on climate protection.

Later in the week, some of Canada’s premiers, including New Brunswick Premier Brian Gallant, will be in Quebec City for a special meeting on climate change. The march and forum are intended to show leaders how serious Canadians are about coming up with climate solutions in the lead up to the international climate talks in Paris later this year.

“It’s all about solutions for that week in Quebec City,” says Corbett, who will speak on federal and provincial laws and policies at the forum. "Premiers agreeing to act together to manage carbon pollution at home and invest in the new jobs found in clean energy and improved energy efficiency will send a strong signal that they, like most Canadians, respect that there is a limit to the amount of carbon pollution the atmosphere can take.”

Corbett, an expert in public policy, will talk about ways our leaders can move fairly and effectively toward an economy that doesn’t depend on fossil fuels.

Other speakers of the Act on Climate Forum include representatives from Canadian universities, the Canadian Labour Congress, labour unions, First Nations, citizen groups and environmental organizations such as the David Suzuki Foundation and Blue Green Canada, among others.

The forum aims to strengthen collaboration between groups across Canada who are working to tackle climate change.

Corbett will be available to media in New Brunswick for on-the-street interviews from Quebec City during the March on Saturday or following the Forum on Sunday.

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MEDIA RELEASE


FREDERICTON — A new poll shows New Brunswickers want their government leaders to act now to protect the climate.

Polling determined an overwhelming majority of New Brunswickers — a margin of nearly 8 to 1 — believe we should be global leaders in protecting the climate by reducing our energy consumption.

The national telephone poll was conducted in the last half of March, just weeks before several Canadian premiers, including New Brunswick Premier Brian Gallant, are gathering in Quebec City for a special meeting on climate change.

The poll also shows New Brunswickers don’t buy into the idea that just because a jurisdiction is small it doesn’t have to take as much action to curb climate change. A majority of New Brunswickers rejected the notion that Canada’s efforts on climate change should be minimal given our country’s total emissions as compared to other polluters such as the U.S. or China.

Instead, New Brunswickers want swift action on climate protection from their leaders. Polling shows 73.3 per cent of people from the province want to see a plan for creating jobs in the renewable energy sector, with 70.2 per cent calling for a promise to legally enforce a cap or limits to carbon pollution. Nearly 70 per cent of New Brunswickers want a commitment to phase out coal, oil and gas and replace them with renewable energy sources.

The national random sample telephone poll involved participation from 3,040 Canadians and was conducted for Climate Action Network Canada by Oracle Research Limited between March 12 to 30. The margin of error for the total 3040-person survey is +/- 1.78%, 19/20 times. See full results here.

Other results related to New Brunswick:

  • 78.7 per cent of New Brunswickers see curbing climate change as a moral issue, saying they believe they are morally obligated to reduce carbon pollution in their daily lives;

  • 63.5 per cent of New Brunswickers disagree with the notion that cheap and accessible energy are more important than the negative impacts they have on the environment;

  • 80 per cent of New Brunswickers want a say in decision-making around energy projects.
On May 30th, let&#039;s show Canada and the world that Red Head is &quot;the end of the line&quot; for Energy East

By Mark D'Arcy, New Brunswick Energy East campaigner, The Council of Canadians

Cacuna stopped it. South Portland stopped it. Now it is Red Head's turn to stand up against the tarsands pipeline.


As attention on Energy East now focuses on New Brunswick and the Bay of Fundy, the residents of Red Head are well into their second month of planning for the large "End of the Line March" on Saturday, May 30th @ 1:00pm.   

Why is the line in the sand being drawn at Red Head? The numbers speak for themselves:  

  • • a 42-inch diameter export pipeline built over 280 proposed waterway crossings in New Brunswick (see this interactive map);
  • • a 150-hectare tank farm capable of housing 7.6 million barrels of oil and heated bitumen will be situated right in the middle of the rural community of Red Head;
  • • a 183-hectare marine terminal complex at Red Head;
  • • supertankers carrying 2.2 million barrels of oil crossing over the Bay of Fundy; and  
  • • pipeline leaks as large as 2.6 million litres per day for up to 2 weeks could go undetected;
The threat of spills into waterways and the Bay of Fundy, and certain toxic air pollution for Red Head, is unacceptable.

Continue reading here: Red Head is "the end of the line" for Energy East

Event Facebook Page:March to the End of the Line

NBEN event page: 
March To The End Of The Line

Council of Canadians Energy East page
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MEDIA RELEASE

FREDERICTON — The Conservation Council of New Brunswick has partnered with Earth Day Canada to help New Brunswickers make eco-friendly choices this April 22 and beyond.

The province's leading environmental organization will be supplying free materials to schools and teachers and providing event toolkits for groups or individuals looking to organize local events across New Brunswick.

The Conservation Council is the official N.B. partner of Earth Day Canada and one of several groups collaborating on the campaign across the country.

The theme of this year's celebration is 'Clean Your Commute,' encouraging Canadians to become VGPs — Very Green People — by embracing green transportation options on April 22.

Other elements include the 'Earth Day Every Day Campaign.' On April 22, Canadians who signed up will receive an 'Earth Day Every Day' toolkit that will give them ideas for fun ways to reduce and track their environmental footprint over the course of the year.

Organizers have also created a 2015 Earth Day Flag which will be signed by people from coast-to-coast who have committed to cutting their carbon emissions by 20 per cent by the year 2020. The flag will be presented during the International Climate Conference in Paris in December, re-creating the moment when a similar flag was presented at the U.N. Earth Summit in 1992.

The Conservation Council will coordinate with New Brunswickers who want to sign the Earth Day Flag.

Prizes are available for people who participate, post about, and share their Earth Day Canada activities.

To receive free promotional materials, resources for teachers, event toolkits, or to arrange to sign the 2015 Earth Day Flag, contact Jon MacNeill, Communications Officer with the Conservation Council.
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Throwing darts at map won't cut it: CCNB says TransCanada has moral duty to withdraw pipeline application

                                                            MEDIA RELEASE

FREDERICTON — TransCanada Corporation has a moral responsibility to withdraw its Energy East project from the national review process now that significant changes have been made to the original oil pipeline proposal, says the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

On Thursday, April 2, TransCanada announced it had cancelled plans to build an export terminal in Cacouna, Que., due to the negative effects it would have on a nearby nursing ground for the endangered Beluga whale.

The company said it is still looking at other potential terminal sites in Quebec and noted it would file any amendments to its application to the National Energy Board between October and December of this year.

The application process for the public to participate in the review of Energy East closed on March 17. Once it has received all necessary documents from the company, the National Energy Board will have 15 months to make a decision on the project.

The Conservation Council says TransCanada has a moral duty toward Canadians to act responsibly by withdrawing its project application because:
 

  • Too many details are still up in the air for the National Energy Board to make a responsible decision in its review — throwing a dart at a map of Canada’s export terminals won’t cut it;
     

  • The company has demonstrated poor business planning for a project of this scale, failing to file its original application in both official languages, and significantly changing the scope of the project after the regulatory review process has already begun;
     

  • It is unfair to proceed with the project given how little is known about what this change will mean for the Bay of Fundy, including the impact on fishers and tourism operators whose livelihood depends on the pristine condition of the bay, and the impact on the many animals that frequent the bay, including the North Atlantic Right whale, one of the top 10 most endangered whales on the planet.

“There are too many unknowns around this project, especially when it comes to the Bay of Fundy,” said Matt Abbott, Fundy Baykeeper with the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

“There are a lot of dedicated people in fisheries, NGOs and government working to protect and improve the coastal waters that are at the base of our economy and culture here in New Brunswick. It just wouldn’t be responsible or fair of TransCanada to string our coastal communities and industries along with an incomplete, ill-thought-out plan."

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CCNB : L'herbicide glyphosate lié au cancer doit être interdit


FREDERICTON —  Récemment le Centre international de la recherche sur le cancer (CIRC) un organisme de l'Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS) a classé un herbicide largement déversé chaque année sur les forêts du Nouveau-Brunswick dans la catégorie des produits chimiques qui posent un risque cancérogène pour l'humain.

Le volume 112 des Monographies du CIRC fait état de la recherche et de l'évaluation et un résumé a été publié dans la revue scientifique  Lancet Oncology.

Le  glyphosate, vendu sous les noms Roundup, Vision, et Vision Max, est un herbicide non-sélectif utilisé en agriculture, en sylviculture, sur des gazons et dans les parcs et zones de loisirs. C'est l'herbicide le plus utilisé au monde.

Le 25 mars 2015,  le groupe de travail du CIRC composé de 17 experts provenant de 11 pays a classé le glyphosate dans la catégorie «cancérogène probable» en s'appuyant sur la recherche faite sur les animaux et sur les humains. Plusieurs études, notamment une étude canadienne ont observé un lien entre l'exposition des travailleurs au produit et une augmentation du risque d'un lymphome non hodgkinien.

«Le glyphosate peut être absorbé par l’organisme et on en a retrouvé dans le sang et dans l’urine de travailleurs qui sont exposés à ce produit » explique Inka Milewski, la conseillère scientifique du Conseil de conservation du Nouveau-Brunswick. «Le glyphosate cause le cancer en endommageant les chromosomes (ADN) ce qui peut entrainer des mutations qui mènent au cancer. Les travailleurs ne sont pas les seuls affectés. Les experts du CIRC font état d'une recherche de l'année 2009 démontrant des altérations chromosomiques chez les résidents de plusieurs communautés à la suite de l'épandage aérien du glyphosate.»

Les herbicides sont utilisés dans les forêts du Nouveau-Brunswick depuis les années1970 quand le gouvernement a autorisé les entreprises de pâtes et de papiers de couper à blanc la fôret naturelle et de la remplacer par des plantations. Près de 13,000 hectares de la forêt de la Couronne de la province en sont arrosés chaque année. L'épandage par des hélicoptères sur près de 25 pour cent (%) des terres à bois d'oeuvre coupé au cours de l'année est fait pendant environ 40 jours aux mois d'août et septembre.

Le Conseil de conservation réclame une interdiction du glyphosate dans les forêts de la Couronne provinciale. «Les politiques et la règlementation sont en retard sur la connaissance scientifique que nous avons de plusieurs polluants dans notre environnement. Les législateurs et agences de règlementation ont trop souvent, trop attendu, avant de prendre des mesures de protection de la santé publique. Nous n'avons qu'à penser au plomb, au dichloro-diphényl-trichloréthane (DDT) au radon, à la dioxine et à la fumée de cigarette.» ajoute Milewski.

Selon Tracy Glynn, la directrice de la campagne de conservation de la forêt du Conseil de conservation il est grand temps d'interdire l'épandage aérien d'herbicide sur nos forêts :  « Le Québec a banni l'utilisation du glyphosate en 2001 et a recours à des équipes de débroussaillage.  Le gouvernement de la Nouvelle-Écosse a récemment mis fin au financement de l'épandage d'herbicide sur les forêts de la province et vise maintenant à obtenir une certification environnementale FSC qui exige une absence d'herbicides dans ses forêts. Malheureusement, ici au Nouveau-Brunswick on persiste à subventionner la sylviculture sur les terres de la Couronne avec entre autres, l'épandage, pour lequel selon les chiffres de Ressources naturelles du Canada la province défraie près de 1 000$ par hectare.

Au cours des dix dernières années, trois pétitions signées par des milliers de Néo-brunswickois à l'encontre de l'épandage d'herbicides sur nos forêts ont été déposées à l'Assemblée législature du N.-B. La dernière a été présentée en 2011. Des résidents du comté de Kent ont récemment risquer l'arrestation et doivent maintenant payer de fortes amendes parce qu'ils ont essayé d'arrêter l'épandage sur leurs terres.

«Les Néo-brunswickois tiennent à la  création de bons emplois et à la protection de leur santé et de celle de la forêt. Le simple bon sens veut que nous fassions comme nos voisins en ayant recours à des équipes de débroussaillage plutôt qu'à des produits chimiques cancérigènes.» a déclaré Tracy Glynn.

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L’ALLIANCE PAIX ET AMITIÉ DEMANDE AU PREMIER MINISTRE GALLANT DE SUSPENDRE LES CONTRATS FORESTIERS ET DE CONSULTER LES PEUPLES INDIGÈNES

 COMMUNIQUÉ        23 MARS 2015

Fredericton NB - Des membres de l’Alliance Paix et Amitié sont inquiets de la décision du gouvernement Gallant d’honorer les ententes forestières qui ont été signées sans consultation valable.

L’Alliance est composée de groupes non gouvernementaux et de peuples indigènes du Nouveau-Brunswick, de la Nouvelle-Écosse et du Maine, en collaboration avec une coalition nationale et internationale, qui tous, sont préoccupés par les assauts de plus en plus nombreux des gouvernements et de l’industrie contre nos terres, notre eau et notre air. 

«Les terres touchées par ces contrats sont les territoires ancestraux qui ont été pris à notre peuple», affirme Ron Tremblay, porte-parole du Grand Conseil de Wolastoq.  «Nous considérons le fait que Brian Gallant ait accepté les contrats comme un manquement à un processus juste et équitable. Les contrats ont été signés sans qu’il y ait eu consultation appropriée auprès des peuples indigènes.»

«Gallant aurait plutôt dû annoncer qu’il allait suspendre les contrats jusqu’à ce que les peuples indigènes aient été convenablement consultés», poursuit Ron Tremblay.

«Cela ne donne qu’une raison de plus pour intenter une action en justice contre ce gouvernement pour qu’il reconnaisse finalement que les terres qu’ils ont cédées pour être détruites appartiennent aux Autochtones »,  ajoute Alma Brooks, mère de clan du Grand Conseil Wolastoq. 

Pour sa part, Maggie Connell, coprésidente de la section de Fredericton du Conseil des Canadiens affirme que «cette transaction forestière s’est conclue en secret et à l’insu des nôtres et des Autochtones de Wolastoq».

«Nous voulons prévenir des dommages irréparables à la Forêt acadienne qui ne va pas pouvoir se régénérer avant des centaines d’années», d’ajouter Connell. «Après le dur hiver que nous avons connu, nos dirigeants élus ne peuvent plus prétendre que les changements climatiques n’ont pas lieu. Nos dirigeants ont une obligation de diligence de prévenir la perte à grande échelle de la couverture forestière. Plusieurs des zones maintenant autorisées pour la coupe en vertu du contrat forestier se situent sur des pentes raides et dans des endroits humides qui, une fois exploitées, ne retiendront plus autant d’eau après de fortes pluies, augmentant d’autant le risque d’inondations dans les agglomérations situées en aval.»


Un rassemblement se tiendra à l’extérieur de l’Assemblée générale annuelle conjointe de trois (3) associations de circonscription libérales du Nouveau-Brunswick ce mercredi, 25 mars, de 17 h 30 à 19 h à la salle des Chevaliers de Colomb, au 170, rue Regent, à Fredericton, afin de dire à Brian Gallant de faire en sorte que nous ayons accès à un processus équitable et de suspendre les contrats forestiers par voie législative. Il s’agit d’une activité familiale auquel le public est invité.
PUBLICATION IMMÉDIATE            COMMUNIQUÉ                                  12 MARS 2015

Est-ce que les résidents de Fredericton pourront demander à TransCanada quels sont les risques d’un déversement de l’oléoduc Énergie Est dans leur eau potable?

FREDERICTON – TransCanada refuse d’organiser une réunion publique pour les résidents de Fredericton, alors que cette compagnie se prépare à rencontrer pour la deuxième fois en un an la communauté des affaires.

Kevin Maloney d’Oléoduc TransCanada prévoit faire une présentation matinale à la Chambre de commerce de Fredericton le 17 mars 2015 au Palais des congrès de Fredericton de 8 heures à 9 heures.  À titre de gérant de la construction du nouvel oléoduc – Ontario & Nouveau-Brunswick, Maloney veut mettre à jour la communauté des affaires sur les progrès de la proposition de l’Oléoduc Énergie Est.

Cette annonce arrive seulement deux semaines après que la population a appris que TransCanada avait fait parvenir une lettre à la Ville de Fredericton pour refuser la requête du Conseil de la ville d’organiser une rencontre publique pour ses citoyens.  Dans une lettre du 11 février 2015, Patrick Lacroix, gérant du projet de TransCanada Énergie-Est, expliquait la position de sa compagnie : « Nous demeurons concentrés sur les collectivités et les propriétaires directement affectés par l’itinéraire de l’oléoduc, » laissant entendre que Fredericton ne serait pas directement affecté par l’oléoduc.

La lettre de TransCanada ne mentionne pas que la compagnie a participé à des rencontres avec la communauté des affaires de Fredericton.  Philippe Cannon de TransCanada a fait une présentation sur la sécurité publique et les impacts économiques de l’oléoduc proposé à la Chambre de commerce de Fredericton, au Club Rotary de Fredericton Nord et au maire Brad Woodside le 17 mars 2014.

Cette contradiction a incité plusieurs membres du Chapitre Fredericton du Conseil des Canadiens de contacter la Chambre de commerce de Fredericton pour lui demander d’ouvrir la rencontre au public.  Une des membres du Conseil, Marzipan Trahms, explique : « Il est injuste que TransCanada rencontre la communauté des affaires de Fredericton mais refuse de rencontrer les citoyens de Fredericton.  Cette façon de se comporter n’est pas bonne pour établir la confiance.  J’ai exprimé mes inquiétudes au président de la Chambre, Joseph O’Donnell et il m’a assuré que la population était la bienvenue à la présentation matinale. »

Maggie Connell, vice-présidente du Chapitre Fredericton du Conseil des Canadiens ne cache pas sa satisfaction avec ce changement, « On doit féliciter la Chambre de commerce de Fredericton d’avoir ouvert cette rencontre au public.  Nous avons hâte d’entendre comment TransCanada va s’occuper d’une manière ouverte et honnête de nos inquiétudes concernant les risques pour notre approvisionnement en eau potable. »

« La question que nous posons à TransCanada est très simple : « Où aboutira un déversement dans la Nashwaak? » affirme madame Connell.  « Va-t-on préparer une modélisation informatique pour prédire si oui ou non des produits toxiques provenant d’un déversement de pétrole atteindra l’aval de la Nashwaak, l’endroit critique d’ouvertures vers l’aquifère de Fredericton?

Don McDonald un résident de Stanley est tellement inquiet de l’impact d’un déversement dans les cours d’eau où il pêche depuis toujours, la Nashwaak et la Miramichi du Sud-ouest, qu’il a demandé il y a une semaine d’être entendu comme intervenant aux audiences de l’Office national de l’Énergie.  « Le bras sud de la Miramichi du Sud-ouest, la Taxis et ses tributaires et le lac Brook se déversent dans la Miramichi du Sud-ouest.  Le ruisseau McGivney et le ruisseau Brook se déversent dans le ruisseau Cross et ensuite dans la Nashwaak pour aboutir dans le fleuve Saint-Jean. »

Monsieur McDonald a souligné les risques élevés pour Fredericton, « Le trajet proposé pour l’oléoduc traverse trois tributaires qui se déversent dans la Nashwaak.  Le débit habituellement élevé du ruisseau Cross et de la Nashwaak signifie qu’un déversement qui pourrait survenir dans le milieu de la nuit et ne serait détecté que le matin, au moment où le déversement arriverait à Fredericton. »

Don se prépare à participer à la présentation de TransCanada et veut poser la question suivante : « Combien de pétrole l’oléoduc doit-il déverser avant que l’on s’en aperçoive et avec quelle précision peut-on identifier l’endroit du déversement?  Ce sont des questions importantes concernant les déversements.  Par exemple, nous avons besoin de connaitre le type d’équipement de télédétection qui sera utilisé et quelles seront les exigences pour les vannes d’arrêt au franchissement des cours d’eau?  Est-ce que ces vannes pourront se fermer automatiquement? »

Elizabeth Hamilton, membre du chapitre de Fredericton du Conseil des Canadiens résume pourquoi son groupe est si préoccupé à propos de cet oléoduc.  Une étude indépendante commandée par une municipalité du Québec a trouvé que des déversements d’Énergie Est aussi importants que 2,6 millions de litres par jour peuvent passer inaperçus.  Et le bitume dilué que TransCanada prévoit pomper dans cet oléoduc est rempli de produits chimiques cancérogènes et coule immédiatement au fond des cours d’eau.

« Nous connaissons de véritables déversements qui démontrent que nos inquiétudes sont fondées,» affirme Madame Hamilton.  « Une quantité estimée à 3,8 millions de litres de sables bitumineux dilués ont été déversés dans une section de 60 kilomètres de la Kalamazoo au Michigan en juillet 2010, obligeant ainsi des centaines de résidents à déménager.  Même après 4 années de nettoyage au cout de 1,3 milliard de dollars, il reste encore environ 600 000 litres de pétrole coincés au fond de la Kalamazoo. »

Madame Hamilton conclut : « Notre inquiétude est qu’un grand déversement de l’oléoduc dans la Nashwaak se retrouverait jusqu’à Fredericton.  Nous devons penser en premier et surtout à la protection de notre eau potable. »

PERSONNES RESSOURCES POUR LES MÉDIAS:

Maggie Connell        506.459.8081

Marzipan Trahms     506.454.6410

LIEN: Journée de la présentation – Oléoduc Énergie-Est

http://business.frederictonchamber.ca/events/details/presentation-day-the-energy-east-pipeline-come-get-the-latest-update-on-its-progress-163

MEDIA RELEASE

FREDERICTON — Proposed new aquaculture regulations will face scrutiny before a senate committee meeting today after a coalition of fishers, fishing associations, business leaders and scientists have said the changes would harm marine environments and wild fisheries such as salmon and lobster.

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick’s Fundy Baykeeper, Matt Abbott, will be watching the meeting and is available for comment to media before and after the proceedings.

Abbott was a leading force behind the open letter sent last month to Prime Minister Stephen Harper calling upon the federal government to scrap the proposed aquaculture activities regulations. The letter was signed by a broad coalition of 120 people and organizations, who will be represented at the Senate Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans by Bill Ernst (Toxicologist, Environment Canada, retired), Rob Johnson (Ecology Action Centre),  and Michael Van den Heuvel (Canada Research Chair in Watershed Ecological Integrity, University of Prince Edward Island).

The hearing takes place at 5 p.m. EST and can be watched online through a webcast. Follow the Twitter handles @AquaRegs and @cc_nb for more updates.

For more information or to arrange an interview, contact:
Matt Abbott, Fundy Baykeeper: 506-321-0429, matt.abbott@conservationcouncil.ca

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick
Established in 1969, the Conservation Council serves as the province’s leading voice for conservation and environmental protection. A leading public policy advocate, CCNB works to find practical solutions to help families and educators, citizens, governments and businesses protect the air we breathe, the water we drink, the precious marine ecosystem and the land, including the forests, that support us.

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Conservation Council of New Brunswick
180 St. John Street, Fredericton NB E3B 4A9
506.458.8747 ::  www.conservationcouncil.ca

MEDIA RELEASE

FREDERICTON — The Conservation Council of New Brunswick has applied to be an intervenor in the National Energy Board’s review of the proposed Energy East oil pipeline.

It is one of nearly 1,000 groups and individuals to apply to participate in the review of TransCanada Corporation’s proposal to build a 4,600-kilometre oil pipeline from the tarsands in Alberta to export terminals in New Brunswick. The deadline to apply to be heard by the NEB was today.

Among other abilities, approved intervenors can file written evidence, ask written questions about evidence supplied by TransCanada, comment on draft conditions, and present written and oral arguments during hearings.

The Conservation Council has also applied to receive participant funding from the NEB which it will use in part to hire a team of scientists to examine the pipeline proposal.

“There are already quite a few holes in the information the Board has received — it's not translated, it neglects to address upstream climate pollution, and we have yet to discover where the second export terminal will be,” said Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

“We need to have scientists with expertise in a range of fields — from oil spill impacts in rivers to how increased tanker traffic will affect the endangered whales in the Bay of Fundy."

Corbett said the large number of groups and individuals who have applied demonstrates the concern Canadians have about the oil pipeline project, even in spite of changes to the hearing process which made it harder for people to be involved.

If approved as an intervenor, the Conservation Council will hire a team of experts to study: 

●      The pipeline’s potential impacts on freshwater fish and fish habitat in New Brunswick;

●      The impact of the pipeline and increased shipping traffic on the Bay of Fundy and its wildlife such as the endangered Right whale;

●      The state of emergency preparedness for responding to an oil spill in the Bay of Fundy; and

●      The risks associated with oil spills and the use of dispersants in the Bay of Fundy and New Brunswick’s freshwater rivers, creeks and streams.

The Conservation Council is asking the National Energy Board to hold hearings in Edmundston and Saint John, at the minimum, so New Brunswickers have fair access to the review process.

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The Conservation Council of New Brunswick

Established in 1969, the Conservation Council serves as the province’s leading voice for conservation and environmental protection. A leading public policy advocate, CCNB works to find practical solutions to help families and educators, citizens, governments and businesses protect the air we breathe, the water we drink, the precious marine ecosystem and the land, including the forests, that support us.

To arrange an interview, contact: Jon MacNeill, Communications Officer | 458-8747 | 261-1353 | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

Conservation Council of New Brunswick
180 St. John Street, Fredericton NB E3B 4A9
506.458.8747 ::  www.conservationcouncil.ca

FREDERICTON — The Conservation Council of New Brunswick has released a powerful tool that shows people just how close the proposed Energy East oil pipeline will be to their home, cottage or favourite fishing hole.

The interactive Google Map allows users to see the nearly 300 points at which the oil pipeline will intersect rivers and streams in New Brunswick. It was generated using Google Earth Pro and documents from TransCanada Corporation, the North American oil and gas giant proposing to build the 4,600-kilometre Energy East oil pipeline from the tarsands in Alberta to export terminals in Quebec and Saint John.

“It’s a really neat tool,” said Stephanie Merrill, Freshwater Protection Program Coordinator for the Conservation Council of New Brunswick. “Whenever someone asks about the pipeline, I can bring up the map on my iPad and say, ‘there’s the route, and that’s how close your family cottage is to it.’ Or, ‘there’s the pipeline slicing through the river you’ve fished for years.”

The Conservation Council is calling on New Brunswickers to use the tool and see how the proposed pipeline will affect them. We’re encouraging people to share stories of their favourite fishing holes, hunting grounds, family cottages or homesteads that are in the pipeline’s path.  

View the map on our website.

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MEDIA RELEASE

Today, Wednesday, February 18, 2015, David Coon, MLA for Fredericton South, introduced a bill to the Legislative Assembly called 'An Act to Return to the Crown Certain Rights Related to Wood Supply and Forest Management.'

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick looks forward to the debate that will now occur over this bill. The way our forest is managed needs to change. Clearcutting and herbicide spraying are outdated practices. Woodlot owners and workers need a fair shot at making a living here and treaties with First Nations must be respected.

We encourage everyone to follow the debate that will now occur between our MLAs about our forest. Now is the time to make our voices heard for forest conservation and twenty-first century forest management.

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The Conservation Council of New Brunswick

Established in 1969, the Conservation Council serves as the province’s leading voice for conservation and environmental protection. A leading public policy advocate, CCNB works to find practical solutions to help families and educators, citizens, governments and businesses protect the air we breathe, the water we drink, the precious marine ecosystem and the land, including the forests, that support us.

To arrange an interview, contact: Jon MacNeill, Communications Officer | 458-8747 | 261-1353 | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

Conservation Council of New Brunswick
180 St. John Street, Fredericton NB E3B 4A9
506.458.8747 ::  www.conservationcouncil.ca
MEDIA RELEASE


Halifax, NS — Business leaders, commercial and recreational fishing associations, scientists, lawyers and environmentalists are calling on Prime Minister Harper to halt the implementation of the proposed Aquaculture Activities Regulations. The changes will exempt the aquaculture industry from the Fisheries Act provisions that “prohibit the release of deleterious substances into water frequented by fish.” Despite broad-based opposition since the beginning of the regulatory change process, which started in 2011, the government of Canada has moved ahead in implementing these changes.

“These regulations will set back Canadian aquatic environmental protection measures several decades,” states Bill Ernst, a retired Environment Canada toxicologist. “They will eliminate Environment Canada’s role in enforcing the law with respect to aquaculture and hand responsibility over to Health Canada who do not have an undivided environmental protection mandate.”

The 120 signatories of an open letter sent today, including the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, contend that the proposed changes will lead to increased environmental risk through the discharge of increasingly powerful pesticides, and other potentially damaging substances into the aquatic ecosystem, significantly reduce government regulatory oversight, and damage Canada’s commercial interests as a provider of untainted seafood.

“We have been fishing alongside the aquaculture industry for decades and we know the impacts open-pen salmon farms can have on the traditional fishery. When the salmon aquaculture industry is poorly regulated it places our industry and livelihoods in jeopardy.  We have grave concerns about the contents of the Aquaculture Activities Regulations, particularly the emphasis on aquaculture industry self-monitoring and regulation, and the capacity of DFO to enforce the proposed regulations,” says Maria Recchia, Executive Director of Fundy North Fisherman’s Association based in Southwestern New Brunswick.

 “The value of our industry is based on a pristine, non-polluted marine environment,” says Stewart Lamont, owner of Tangier Lobster in Nova Scotia. “We have already dealt with the impacts of pesticides, and see federal fines levied on something that would now become legal. To have DFO authorize pollution from a coastal industry is simply baffling.”

A newly-released scientific study by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans on the impacts of two pesticides used to treat sea lice, Salmonsan and Alphamax, shows that there are lethal effects on lobster and the risk from one of those, Alphamax, exists up to ten kilometres from sites of use and concludes that there is a general lack of data on pesticide impacts on a wide variety of other marine species.

“We already know that our oceans and coastal ecosystems are suffering from far too much pollution. With these proposed regulatory changes, we are actively allowing further pollution of our coastal waters.  Our coastal industries, particularly those that rely on a healthy marine environment will be put at risk,” says Dr. Susanna Fuller, Marine Conservation Coordinator at the Ecology Action Centre.” In addition, our international reputation on environmental protection will be impacted – something we can’t afford, particularly given the importance of the export markets to our fisheries.”

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For More Information:

Matt Abbott, Fundy Baykeeper, Conservation Council of New Brunswick, matt.abbott@conservationcouncil.ca c: 506-321-0429 w: 506-529-8838 twitter @MattAbbot @FundyBaykeeper

Maria Recchia, Executive Director, Fundy North Fishermen’s Association e: mariarecchia@nb.aibn.com c:506-469-4191

Stewart Lamont, Managing Director, Tangier Lobster e: stewart@tangierlobster.com 902.456.0712

Bill Ernst, retired toxicologist, Environment Canada e: wrernst1@gmail.com cell 902-999-5771, home 902 865 5771

Susanna Fuller, PhD. Marine Conservation Coordinator, Ecology Action Centre e: marine@ecologyaction.ca c: 902-483-5033 twitter @sdfuller @EAC_Seamouse

Background Information:

Click here for the open letter to Prime Minister Stephen Harper. 

Consultations were held starting in 2011 on proposed changes to the Fisheries Act regarding treatment of sealice in the open net pen finfish farming industry. Proposed regulations were published in the Canada Gazette on August 23rd, 2014. http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/2014/2014-08-23/html/reg1-eng.php

Conservation Council of New Brunswick
180 St. John Street, Fredericton NB E3B 4A9
506.458.8747 ::  www.conservationcouncil.ca
MEDIA RELEASE
Energy East oil pipeline: Back to the drawing board


FREDERICTON — The Conservation Council of New Brunswick says TransCanada Corporation has to head back to the drawing board to patch all the holes that have surfaced in its plans for the proposed Energy East oil pipeline.

On Wednesday, Feb. 11, Montreal newspaper La Presse reported that the Alberta-based oil giant had ruled out Cacouna, Que. - a beluga nursery ground - as the site of an export oil terminal.

TransCanada’s original plans for the 4,600-kilometre-long oil pipeline involved shipping crude oil from the tar sands in Alberta to export terminals in Cacouna and Saint John.

Following the report from La Presse, company spokesperson Tim Duboyce denied claims that a decision had been made on the Cacouna terminal. Duboyce was quoted as saying “the reality is we’re just not there yet,” stating all options were still on the table.

“Those kind of statements only firm up our point that this project should not be undergoing a review at this time,” says Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council.

“If all options are still on the table, how can regulators be expected to make an informed decision? Perhaps more importantly, how is it fair to ask the public to spend their time, effort, and money today reviewing and commenting on the pipeline’s environmental impacts when, because of the project’s state of flux, they aren’t fully known at this time?”

The National Energy Board began accepting applications for public participation in the hearing process on Feb. 3. People looking to submit comments to the board must apply by March 3.

“How can anyone making his or her living from providing whale watching tours in the Bay of Fundy feel confident participating in the energy board process, when they have no idea exactly how much of the 1.1-million barrels of oil will end up in nearby Saint John, or how many supertankers will be coursing through the world’s highest tides?” Corbett says.

“The company can’t even answer these questions yet, and when it comes to our water, fisheries, tourism and wildlife like the endangered Right Whale, New Brunswickers can’t afford to be left guessing.”

The Cacouna question hasn’t been the only snag in the pipeline proposal.

Earlier this week, TransCanada came under fire from Francophone communities for failing to provide its official filings in French. At the same time, First Nation leaders in Ontario demanded the National Energy Board halt its review until they are properly consulted.

“In our view, TransCanada only has one option before them right now: withdraw its application to the National Energy Board and rethink the need for this project,” Corbett says. 

To arrange an interview, contact:

Jon MacNeill, Communications Officer | 458-8747 | 261-1353 | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

 

Conservation Council of New Brunswick
180 St. John Street, Fredericton NB E3B 4A9
506.458.8747 ::  www.conservationcouncil.ca
Council of Canadians, Fredericton, Moncton and Saint John Chapters

Open letter to the Minister of Natural Resources




 


February 11, 2015

Minister Denis Landry

Chancery Place, 675 King Street

Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 1E9

Dear Mr. Landry:

This is to express grave concerns about the lack of our government’s intervention on the forestry strategy introduced by the Alward government. With every passing day, more wood is being cut from our Crown Lands without the permission of its owners—the people of New Brunswick.   

Seven years ago, in February 2008, the results of a comprehensive public survey (1) on forest management practices commissioned by DNR provided empirical evidence that industry was already harvesting too much fibre off Crown Lands and had too much control over our forests.  As a cabinet minister at the time, you may recall that a tour organized to inform people about the results of this survey was cancelled by Donald Arsenault, then Minister of Natural Resources.

That survey represented how New Brunswickers wanted their forests managed. Those findings still apply, until proven otherwise, using a survey of the same scientific rigour. 

New Brunswickers expected, then, as they do now, that our forests would be managed for the following, and in the order prescribed: water protection, wildlife habitat, fire protection, protection against thefts, disease and insect protection, biodiversity, and as a source of fibre for industry. A key finding, too, was that the public wanted more and better opportunities to provide input on the management of their forests. Clearly, this public opinion survey demonstrated that the Alward government had no social license to negotiate the type of forestry agreements that are now in place.

The choice is clear. On the one hand, our government may opt to abide by the new forest management agreements.  On the other hand, however, our government can choose to accept the will of the majority of New Brunswickers.  And it’s not as if industry had no other source of fibre.  To paraphrase Morris Green, ex-Minister under the McKenna government, private woodlot owners have the wood to meet industry requirements.  According to this view, there would have been no need to increase the annual allowable cut from our forests because it was already available from private woodlot owners.  In sum, then, the issue is whether to allow industry or the owners of the forests to dictate how the people’s forests are to be managed.

Our own standpoint is that the forestry strategy must be halted.  We maintain that other forest governance models, like community forests, as suggested during the hearings organized by the Legislative Select Committee on Wood Supply in 1999, would be more beneficial in terms of long-term job creation and developing our local economies.  In fact, a recent study done by researchers at Simon Fraser University provides tangible evidence that “community forests perform better overall than other forms of tenures for selected indicators of local benefits” (i.e., diversification, local employment, and local value). Although some, like the four licensees might object to having their forest management agreements cancelled, we would argue that these agreements were made behind closed doors and without the involvement of the owners of this resource.

If the new Liberal government is to establish its credibility on this important issue, the forest strategy must be retracted immediately.

We look forward with great anticipation to hearing from you soon on this important file.

Links to New Brunswick Conservation Council productions 'Beau Bear' and 'Forbidden Forest'


*****
Lettre ouverte à le ministre des Ressources naturelles



Monsieur le ministre des Ressources naturelles,

Nous vous écrivons pour vous exprimer nos vives préoccupations face à l’absence d’intervention de notre gouvernement concernant la stratégie forestière introduite par l’administration Alward.  Chaque jour, plus de bois est coupé sur nos terres de la Couronne sans permission de son propriétaire, la population du Nouveau-Brunswick.

Il y a sept années, en février 2008, les résultats d’une enquête publique exhaustive (1) sur les pratiques de gestion forestière, commandée par le ministère des Ressources naturelles, ont fourni des données empiriques qui démontraient que les entreprises récoltaient déjà alors trop de fibres des terres de la Couronne et qu’elles exerçaient un trop grand contrôle sur nos forêts.  Comme membre du cabinet à l’époque, vous pouvez vous souvenir qu’une tournée organisée pour faire connaitre à la population les résultats de cette enquête avait été annulée par Donald Arsenault alors ministre des Ressources naturelles.

L’enquête démontrait comment les Néobrunswickois voulaient que les forêts soient gérées.  Ces résultats sont toujours valides jusqu’à des preuves du contraire proviennent d’une enquête scientifique aussi rigoureuse.

Les Néobrunswickois s’attendaient alors, comme maintenant, à ce que nos forêts soient gérées en tenant compte des facteurs suivants et dans cet ordre de priorité : la protection de l’eau, la protection des habitats de la faune, la protection contre les incendies, la protection contre le vol, la protection contre les maladies et les insectes, la biodiversité, et la forêt comme source de fibres pour les entreprises.  Une autre conclusion importante de l’enquête était que la population voulait avoir de plus nombreuse et de meilleures occasions de donner son opinion sur la gestion de ses forêts.  Clairement, cette enquête sur les opinions de la population a démontré que l’administration Alward ne possédait pas l’autorisation sociale de négocier le type d’entente forestière qui est présentement en vigueur.

Le choix est clair.  D’une part, notre administration provinciale peut choisir de respecter les nouvelles ententes de gestion forestière.  Par ailleurs, toutefois, notre administration peut choisir d’accepter la volonté de la majorité des Néobrunswickois.  Et ce n’est pas comme si l’industrie n’avait aucune autre source de fibres.  Pour paraphraser Morris Green, l’ancien ministre de l’administration McKenna, les propriétaires de lots boisés possèdent le bois pour satisfaire les besoins de l’industrie.  Selon cette autre option, il n’aurait pas été nécessaire d’accroitre la valeur des coupes annuelles permises des forêts de la Couronne parce les propriétaires privés de boisés auraient pu suffire à la demande.  Donc en somme, l’enjeu consiste à permettre soit aux industries ou soit aux propriétaires des forêts de dicter comment les forêts doivent être gérées.

Selon nous, c’est la stratégie forestière qui doit être abandonnée.  Tel que suggéré lors des audiences organisées par le Comité spécial de l’Assemblée législature sur l’approvisionnement en bois en 1999, nous soutenons que d’autres modèles de gouvernance comme les forêts communautaires seraient plus bénéfiques en termes de création d’emplois à long terme et de développement de nos économies locales.  En fait, une récente étude préparée par des chercheurs de l’université Simon Fraser fournit des preuves concrètes que « les forêts communautaires donnent un meilleur rendement dans l’ensemble que les autres formes de tenure lorsque l’on considère les indicateurs des bénéfices locaux (comme la diversification, l’emploi local, la valeur locale).  Bien que certains comme les quatre détenteurs de permis pourraient s’opposer à l’annulation de leurs ententes de gestion forestière, nous pourrions argumenter que ces ententes ont été conclues à huit clos et sans participation des propriétaires de la ressource.

Si la nouvelle administration Libérale veut établir sa crédibilité sur cet enjeu important, la stratégie forestière doit être désavouée immédiatement.

Nous attendons avec grand intérêt votre prompte réaction à cet important dossier et nous vous prions, monsieur le ministre, d’accepter l’expression de notre haute considération

Maggie Connell & Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, Co-Chairs

Council of Canadians Fredericton Chapter

Pamela Ross, Chair, Council of Canadians Moncton Chapter

Leticia Adair, Chair, Council of Canadians Saint John Chapter

cc: Premier Brian Gallant
     Media

Liens au Nouveau-Brunswick Conservation Council productions 'Beau Bear' et 'Forbidden Forest'


MEDIA RELEASE



Attention News Editors: Today the National Energy Board begins accepting applications for public participation in the Energy East oil pipeline hearing. The Conservation Council of New Brunswick has produced a video to help New Brunswickers learn how they can get involved in this process. Our staff is available to speak to media about the National Energy Board hearing and our instructional video.


Key Points:

  • In 2012 the federal government introduced changes to the way pipeline projects are reviewed which made it harder for the public to participate. The Conservation Council wants to make it easier for New Brunswickers to get involved so the National Energy Board understands how this project will affect our water, whales and the Bay of Fundy.

  • People have 30 days to apply to participate in the National Energy Board’s hearing on Energy East. The deadline to apply is March 3, 2015.

  • The proposed Energy East oil pipeline would be the first oil pipeline built the length of New Brunswick. Its proposed route crosses hundreds of acres of farmland, woodlot, and private property, and crosses several important provincial watercourses, including rivers and streams in the St. John River basin, the Miramichi, Tobique, Salmon and Madawaska rivers, Coal Creek (which drains into Grand Lake), and the Bay of Fundy.

  • Watch our video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGs_ogICIQQ


The Conservation Council of New Brunswick

Established in 1969, the Conservation Council serves as the province’s leading voice for conservation and environmental protection. A leading public policy advocate, CCNB works to find practical solutions to help families and educators, citizens, governments and businesses protect the air we breathe, the water we drink, the precious marine ecosystem and the land, including the forests, that support us.

To arrange an interview, contact:

Jon MacNeill, Communications Officer | 458-8747 | 261-1353 | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

Conservation Council of New Brunswick
180 St. John Street, Fredericton NB E3B 4A9
506.458.8747 ::  www.conservationcouncil.ca
Sentinelles Petitcodiac recrute des bénévoles pour son conseil d'administration. 
Nous vous invitons à poser votre candidature et à partager cette information dans vos réseaux. L'AGA aura lieu le 20 mars 2015. 
Voir le lien suivant: 
http://petitcodiac.org/aimeriez-vous-aider-a-redonner-vie-aux-rivieres-petitcodiac-memramcook-et-shepody/?lang=fr
Check out this great initiative carried out in Pemba, Zanzibar by Community Forests International: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/scaling-innovation

Pembans have built massive rain water storage systems, wired solar micro-grid, and worked alongside nature to grow over 1,000,000 trees spanning 30 different species!  Now we want to help expand these innovative approaches and technologies and share them far and wide.  Join with us, as we take rural innovation to the next level.


MEDIA RELEASE

Conservation Council congratulates Premier Gallant for leadership on fracking moratorium

(Fredericton, NB) — The Conservation Council of New Brunswick is congratulating Premier Brian Gallant for his strong leadership and commitment to protect New Brunswickers and our water by imposing a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing in the province.

“We’re proud of Premier Brian Gallant and his cabinet for standing firm to protect water and clean air,” said Stephanie Merrill, Freshwater Protection Program coordinator with the Conservation Council. “Placing a moratorium on shale gas development shows that Premier Gallant is serious about protecting the environment, particularly our water."

The Conservation Council was among the first organizations in the province to raise awareness around the potential health and environmental risks associated with hydraulic fracturing, a process which uses large amounts of water mixed with chemicals to break up shale rock formations and release natural gas reserves held below ground.

CCNB’s Freshwater Protection Program spearheaded grassroots opposition to the practice, prompting one of the broadest and widest-ranging coalitions in the province’s recent history, a support network that included First Nations, doctors, scientists, clergy, labour unions, municipal politicians, farmers, and more.

“The conditions placed on the moratorium are strongly worded and significant,” said Merrill. “It gives us time to develop clean energy jobs instead of being under constant pressure from the fossil fuel lobby.”

“The premier’s announcement heralds a new day for New Brunswick,” added Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council. “Today, we’re celebrating this milestone for progressive environmental and economic policy.”

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To arrange an interview, contact:

Jon MacNeill, Communications Officer | 458-8747 | 261-1353 | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

Conservation Council of New Brunswick
180 St. John Street, Fredericton NB E3B 4A9
506.458.8747 ::  www.conservationcouncil.ca
December 8, 2014 By

Without a Paddle

Documenting the failure—and the potential—of New Brunswick’s Water Classification Program. Posted on December 8, 2014 in Water Canada’s November/December 2014 issue.

During the height offishing season in New Brunswick, as anglers lured Atlantic salmon on the famous Miramichi River and kids navigated through thickets to seek out their favourite summer swimming holes, a report came forth casting a stark and sobering reality for the rivers so enjoyed in the province. On August 15, 2014, Charles Murray, the New Brunswick ombudsman, an independent authority of the provincial legislature, released the details of his investigation into the Department of Environment’s handling of its Water Classification Program. The program was the first in Canada to take a proactive, watershed-based approach to river protection when it was introduced in 2002. But the ombudsman determined the program was, in effect, nothing more than an illusion, giving New Brunswickers a woefully false impression about the safety of their rivers for more than a decade.

In the 12 years since it was established, not a single waterway has been protected under the classification system. The program was instead plagued by bureaucratic confusion, lacklustre political will, and misuse of power from the elected officials charged with overseeing it.

New Brunswick’s Department of Environment had all the required documentation to classify the Nashwaak River by no later than 2003—but classification never came. Credit: Paul McLaughlin, Nashwaak Watershed Association.
New Brunswick’s Department of Environment
had all the required documentation to classify
the Nashwaak River by no later than 2003—but
classification never came. Credit: Paul McLaughlin,
Nashwaak Watershed Association.

“Like a smoke detector without batteries,” Murray wrote in his report, “[the regulation] appears to address and remedy a problem when in reality it does nothing of the sort.” The classification program, he concluded, “exists primarily as a mirage, misleading observers to their detriment.”

That’s certainly a far cry from what was expected by conservationists and departmental officials alike when the program was first unveiled. The Water Classification Program was brought forth under Regulation 2002-13 as a progressive attempt to set water quality standards for New Brunswick rivers. The regulation allows community-based organizations to collect water samples, analyze water quality, and set goals to maintain or improve the water quality of rivers. It was the final piece of a progressive regulatory regime put in place by the provincial government, complementing the Wellfield Protected Areas Designation passed in 2000 and the Watershed Protected Areas Designation enacted in 2001.

Over time, the department received 19 separate proposals for classification from groups across the province. Among them was an application from the Nashwaak Watershed Association, which had been exceptionally proactive on the file, having secured funding from the government to conduct water quality tests before the regulation had even been passed.

In his report, the ombudsman noted the department had all the necessary documentation required to classify the Nashwaak by no later than 2003. What followed were years of correspondence between the department and the Nashwaak association, during which officials described the river and other provincial watercourses as being “provisionally” classified, giving the impression that full classification was just around the corner.

Frustrated by the lack of movement on the program, the Nashwaak Watershed Association and its supporters, including the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, filed a complaint to the office of the ombudsman in February 2013, spearheading Murray’s investigation.

“I think New Brunswickers were blindsided and even surprised to learn our rivers were not being protected,” said Stephanie Merrill, freshwater protection program coordinator for the Conservation Council of New Brunswick. “And we should be. It’s a shame that in a province like New Brunswick, where so much of our culture, heritage, and recreation is based around our rivers, that we do not have fundamental protections for our waters. It’s so basic. New Brunswickers have assumed that’s covered.”

In an interview with the Conservation Council for this article, the ombudsman said the most troubling finding from his investigation was simply that government gave citizens a false impression for so many years that watercourses were being protected.

“That speaks to a really fundamental failure,” Murray said. “It can’t really be a larger failure than that.”

His report offered some explanations—citing confusion within the Department of Environment over the legal authority of the regulation and the troubling misuse of ministerial discretion by successive ministers to avoid approving the applications—but above all else, Murray said a lack of focused political will is primarily 
to blame.

But therein lies the hope for New Brunswick’s waterways moving forward.

A new provincial government, under the leadership of Liberal Premier Brian Gallant, was sworn into power on October 7. During the fall election campaign, the Liberal Party of New Brunswick pledged to “take steps to help ensure the health of our rivers and drinking water.” What better opportunity, Murray said, then moving swiftly to approve the 19 rivers submitted under the Water Classification Program?

“Why not be proactive and make yourself the champion of that change?” Murray said of the new government. “To me, this is an opportunity for the Minister of Environment to demonstrate competence, good faith, and to rebuild some bridges of trust between the department and the communities.”

With some focused attention and priority, by the time New Brunswickers set out with their fishing rods or swimming suits to indulge in our waterways next summer, they’ll hopefully do so with the full confidence that regulations are in effect to ensure rivers will remain safe and healthy for them to enjoy.  WC

Jon MacNeill is the communications officer for the Conservation Council of New Brunswick. This article appears in Water Canada’s November/December 2014 issue.



                                                              MEDIA RELEASE

60+ Groups Call for a Climate Review of Energy East

Leading environmental organizations & community groups call for the National Energy Board to consider the upstream climate impacts of the pipeline

Full Letter: http://350.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Final-NEB-Letter-PDF.pdf
 

Montreal, QC – Today, more than 60 environmental and community groups from across Canada sent a letter to Peter Watson, head of the National Energy Board, demanding that the NEB include climate change in its review of the Energy East project. This letter comes in addition to 60,000 messages sent from people all across Canada to the NEB calling for a climate review.

“By failing to consider climate change, the National Energy Board is overlooking what should be Question One for a review of the pipeline — does it even make sense in a world trying to reduce its dependence on oil and make deep cuts in carbon pollution?” says Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick. 

The Energy East project would release 30 to 32 million tonnes of carbon dioxide each year, the same as adding seven million cars to Canada’s roads. This is more than any single Atlantic province, and bigger than the emissions saved in Ontario’s entire coal phase out. In comparison, the Keystone XL pipeline, which now faces a climate test from U.S. President Barack Obama, would increase emissions by 22 million tonnes.

“The best scientific minds on the planet are telling us that we need to rapidly transition off of fossil fuels to address climate change, and Energy East would be a step in the exact opposite direction,” says Patrick Bonin, Climate & Energy campaigner with Greenpeace Canada. “Without considering the upstream climate impacts of Energy East, the NEB’s review will be incomplete and illegitimate.”

“If we can’t talk about tar sands expansion and climate change at the NEB, where can we?” says Andrea Harden-Donahue, Energy and Climate Justice Campaigner. “Pipeline infrastructure is nearing capacity in Alberta. Adding 1.1 million barrels every day, Energy East will absolutely spur tar sands expansion and significant carbon pollution.”

In late November, the NEB’s refusal to consider the climate change impacts of tar sands pipelines came under even more intense criticism as over 100 people were arrested on Burnaby Mountain. Many of those arrested protesting the proposed Trans-Mountain project cited climate change, and that the NEB had refused to hear climate concerns, as the reason for their actions.

“The tar sands are Canada’s fastest growing source of emissions, and building projects like Energy East will only make that worse,” says Catherine Abreu, Energy Coordinator with the Ecology Action Center. “If Canada is going to be a part of the solution when it comes to climate change, we need to apply a climate test to projects like Energy East, and reject them if they will make climate change worse.”


Groups signed on: 350.org, Alerte Pétrole Rive Sud, Alternatives, Association québécoise de lutte contre la pollution atmosphérique (AQLPA), Canadian Unitarians for Social Justice, Canadian Voice of Women for Peace, Center for Sustainble Economy, Centre de recherche en éducation et formation relatives à l’environnement et à l’écocitoyenneté de l’UQAM, Citizens Climate Lobby Montreal, Citizen’s Climate Lobby Canada, ClimateFast, Coalition québécoise pour une gestion responsable de l’eau Eau Secours, Coalition vigilance oléoducs, Collectif scientifique sur la question du gaz de schiste au Québec, Comité de vigilance environnementale de l’Est de Montréal, Concerned Citizen's Coalition - North Bay, Conseil Central du Montréal Méopolitain-CSN, Conservation Council of New Brunswick, Council of Canadians, Council of Canadians - Fredericton Chapter, Council of Canadians - Halifax Chapter, Council of Canadians - Montreal Chapter, Council of Canadians - Moose Jaw Chapter, Council of Canadians - Ottawa Chapter, Council of Canadians - Regina Chapter, Council of Canadians - Saint John Chapter, Council of Canadians - Thunder Bay Chapter, Council of Canadians-Winnipeg Chapter, Ecology Action Center, Ecology Ottawa, Environnement Jeunesse, Equiterre, Fondation David Suzuki / David Suzuki Foundation, For Our Grandchildren, ForestEthics Advocacy, Fossil Free Lakehead, Friends of the Earth Canada, Green 13, Green Neighbours 21, Greenpeace Canada, Greenspiration, JustEarth- a Coalition for Environmental Justice, Lakehead University Environmental Law Students' Association, Leadnow.ca, Making Peace Vigil - Regina, Natural Resources Defense Council, New Brunswick Anti Shale Gas Alliance, Non à une marée noire dans le Saint-Laurent, Polaris Institute, Regroupement national des conseils régionaux de l’environnement du Québec, Regroupement vigilance hydrocarbures Québec, Sacred Heart School of Halifax Environment Committee, Saskatchewan Eco Network, Saskatoon350.org, SaveCanada, Sierra Club BC, Sierra Club of Québec, Stop the Energy East Pipeline Halifax, Toronto350 org, Transition Initiative Kenora, Voters Taking Action on Climate Change

More info:

-       350.org/EnergyEast

-       http://canadians.org/energyeast

-       http://bit.ly/MOOWmP

Media contacts:
 

Jon MacNeill – Conservation Council of New Brunswick, jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca, 506-458-8747

Cameron Fenton - 350.org - cam@350.org, 604-369-2155

Andrea Harden-Donahue - Council of Canadians, aharden@canadians.org, 613-793-5488

Ben Powless - Ecology Ottawa - ben.powless@ecologyottawa.ca - 613-601-4219

Patrick Bonin - Greenpeace Canada, 514-594-1221

Geneviève Puskas - Equiterre, gpuskas@equiterre.org 514-792-5222

Conservation Council of New Brunswick
180 St. John Street, Fredericton NB E3B 4A9
506.458.8747 ::  www.conservationcouncil.ca


                                                               MEDIA RELEASE

Conservation Council pleased to see government raising bar on accountability and transparency around public forests

(Fredericton, N.B.) — The Conservation Council of New Brunswick is commending the provincial government for releasing the details of the forestry agreements signed last year by the previous government.

“We’re pleased this government has cast some transparency and light on deals New Brunswickers should know about,” says Lois Corbett, Executive Director of the Conservation Council.

“The documents that came out today are a good first step toward fulfilling the new government's promise to review both the unfair contracts and the unsustainable forest management plan released in March.”

The Forest Management Agreements, signed by industry and the former provincial government last July, drew widespread criticism from biologists, conservationists, hunters and fishers who said the deals give industry an unsustainable amount of public forest and allow companies to clearcut in areas that were previously off-limits.

The Conservation Council is confident Minister Landry will soon release another series of forestry planning documents that will clearly show where the increased logging will occur.

“We’re certain that with that information in hand, and in the public domain, the provincial government will revise the plan to ensure the new strategy will never put the environment or the sustainability of the public forests at risks,” Corbett says.

CCNB says a revised plan would protect sensitive areas like along riverbanks and streams, preserve old growth stands, protect areas that are important for deer, lynx and other woodland creatures, and discontinue herbicide spraying like governments in Nova Scotia and Quebec have done for years.

                                                                                                                                             -30-

To arrange an interview, contact:

Jon MacNeill, Communications Officer | 458-8747 | 261-1353 | jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca

Conservation Council of New Brunswick
180 St. John Street, Fredericton NB E3B 4A9
506.458.8747 ::  www.conservationcouncil.ca
FREDERICTON, NB: Le 19 novembre 2014, pour célébrer la Journée nationale de l’enfant au Nouveau-Brunswick, les groupes ont annoncé leur intention de présenter une nouvelle Déclaration des droits pour que gouvernement l’adopte. Ce projet de loi protègerait la santé des enfants des menaces environnementales comme les produits chimiques omniprésents dans l’air, l’eau et la nourriture et dans les produits de consommation sans oublier les impacts des changements climatiques.



Jusqu’ici, les célébrités canadiennes Raffi Cavoukian et David Suzuki, ainsi que des chercheurs réputés, des physiciens, vingt-quatre organisations et plus de 200 personnes au Canada et d’ailleurs ont authentifié leur appui à cette historique déclaration des droits.



Récemment en septembre, la Fondation David Suzuki a présenté le projet de loi proposé lors d’un évènement tenu à Saint John et faisant partie de la Tournée transcanadienne du point bleu qui fait la promotion d’un environnement sain pour tous les Canadiens. David Suzuki a déclaré : « Il est temps que le Canada se joigne à plus de 110 nations qui reconnaissent le droit des citoyens de vivre dans un environnement sain. La proposition de la Déclaration des droits pour protéger la santé des enfants des menaces environnementales est un pas positif et marquant vers la reconnaissance des droits environnementaux à tous les niveaux des gouvernements au Canada. »



Pour sa part, en juin dernier, Raffi Cavoukian, chanteur, auteur et fondateur du Centre pour le respect des enfants et champion du Collectif pour la santé des enfants et l’environnement au Nouveau-Brunswick a aidé au lancement du projet de loi au Centre des ressources régionales pour la famille de Fredericton.



« Présenter ce projet de loi au gouvernement pour son adoption est la prochaine étape logique, » confirme Raffi. « Cette proposition d’une déclaration des droits confirme le devoir de la société de nourrir et de protéger les jeunes au meilleur de nos capacités. Ce projet de loi encourage nos efforts pour créer des collectivités bienveillantes qui appuient le développement sain des enfants. Et cela renforcit nos efforts pour fournir des environnements salutaires à la fois à l’intérieur comme à l’extérieur, partout où les enfants vivent, apprennent, jouent et grandissent. C'est pourquoi nous avons besoin de cette Déclaration des droits. »



De son côté, Sharon Murphy de PEACE NB a souligné qu’il existait maintenant suffisamment de preuves que l’exposition à la pollution de l’air et de l’eau, à la contamination de l’alimentation et l’exposition aux produits chimiques toxiques dans les produits de consommation sont des causes de maladies chroniques chez les enfants, notamment l’asthme, la leucémie, les anomalies congénitales, l’obésité infantile, le diabète de type 2, le cancer du cerveau ainsi que les lésions cérébrales qui se traduisent en retard de développement, en difficultés d’apprentissage, en QI plus faibles, en déficit d’attention et en troubles d’hyperactivité avec déficit de l’attention.



Murphy poursuit en déclarant que : « En protégeant la santé de nos enfants, nous nous protégeons aussi. Les enfants sont beaucoup plus vulnérables aux produits toxiques et aux effets des changements climatiques que les adultes. Nous avons le devoir comme adultes de protéger nos enfants parce qu’ils sont incapables de se protéger eux-mêmes. Et la protection de la santé des enfants et de la salubrité de l’environnement va économiser d’importantes sommes destinées aux soins de santé. Des écosystèmes salubres bénéficient de plusieurs manières aux générations actuelles et futures. »



Ce projet de loi a été initié par le Collaboratif sur la santé de l’enfant du Nouveau-Brunswick en 2009. Il a été rédigé en consultation avec le Bureau du défenseur des enfants et de la jeunesse du Nouveau-Brunswick, Écojustice et l’Association pour le droit environnemental de la côte Est, avec des contributions et de l’appui de la part du Centre pour le respect des enfants l’Association des troubles d’apprentissage du Nouveau-Brunswick, le Centre de ressources familiales de Fredericton, PEACE-NB et l’Association Pulmonaire du Nouveau-Brunswick.



- 30 –



Contact:

Céline Surette

celine.surette@umoncton.ca

858-4854

Archives des nouvelles des groupes

Évènements à venir

Atlantic Stormwater Conference
Mon, May 22nd, 2017
Musquash Trailblazers - Nature Conservancy of Canada Volunteer Events
Fri, May 26th, 2017
Corn Hill Nursery: Honey Blossom Festival
Sat, Jun 3rd, 2017
Corn Hill Nursery

Appels à l'action

APPEL À L'ACTION: Rétablir le financement au Réseau canadien de l’environnement

vendredi 3 février 2017
by Raissa Marks
APPEL À L’ACTION - Le Réseau canadien de l’environnement (RCEN) et ses réseaux provinciaux affiliés ont besoin de votre aide !

Dans le passé, le Réseau canadien de l’environnement et les réseaux provinciaux affiliés incluant le RENB ont reçu un financement annuel de base du gouvernement du Canada. Ce financement était utilisé pour faciliter le réseautage sur les questions environnementales nationales, pour coordonner les caucus nationaux et provinciaux sur les enjeux spécifiques, pour coordonner la participation des ONGE aux processus de consultation publique du gouvernement fédéral, et pour maintenir actives les lignes de communication entre les ONGE et le gouvernement fédéral.

En 2011, à la suite des réductions systématiques de budget des organisations civiles par l’administration fédérale précédente, toutes les subventions fédérales au RCEN et à ses réseaux provinciaux affiliés ont été coupées. Ce qui a laissé le réseau national et la plupart des réseaux affiliés se débrouiller principalement grâce au bénévolat avec des moyens limités pour accomplir leur travail.

On espère que l’administration actuelle va renouveler le financement du RCEN lors du prochain budget. Ce financement est essentiel pour la survie du réseau national et pour plusieurs des réseaux provinciaux affiliés. Une proposition a été soumise. C’est le temps maintenant de démontrer l’appui solide et immédiat des groupes environnementaux et de la population partout au pays.

C’est ici que vous entrez en jeu !

Veuillez prendre quelques minutes pour écrire au premier ministre Trudeau et à votre député pour leur dire pourquoi vous estimez le RCEN, votre réseau provincial affilié, ou le réseautage environnemental à l’échelle nationale en général. N’hésitez pas à utiliser le modèle de lettre inclus ci-dessous. Vous pouvez la personnaliser en vous fondant sur votre expérience ou simplement la copier-coller.

L’adresse électronique du premier ministre Trudeau est justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca et vous pouvez trouver l’adresse électronique de votre député au http://www.parl.gc.ca/Parliamentarians/fr/members.

Démontrons à nos politiciens fédéraux qu’une communauté environnementale de base bien connectée est essentielle pour un Canada fort !

Modèle de lettre suggérée :

Monsieur le premier ministre,

Je vous écris pour vous demander que le financement annuel de base accordé au Réseau canadien de l’environnement (RCEN) soit rétabli.

Traditionnellement, le RCEN a fourni un lien essentiel entre les groupes environnementaux grands et petits à travers le Canada. Ces liens sont vitaux pour aider les collectivités à s’occuper des enjeux environnementaux dans tout le pays et pour s’assurer qu’une approche robuste au développement d’une politique environnementale existe au Canada.

Depuis que les subventions ont été éliminées en 2011, le RCEN et la plupart de ses réseaux provinciaux affiliés ont dû fonctionner principalement en se fondant sur le bénévolat avec une capacité réduite pour accomplir leur travail. Ce n’est pas acceptable. Une communauté environnementale de base bien connectée est essentielle pour un Canada fort. Je vous encourage à rétablir immédiatement le financement de base pour ces travaux importants.

Recevez, monsieur le premier ministre, l’expression de notre haute considération.

Still Time to Submit Comments - Snowmobile Trail Development up Mount Carleton

lundi 21 novembre 2016
by Roberta Clowater, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - New Brunswick Chapter
You can still send in your comments until end of day Nov 21 (Monday) on the environmental assessment report about the proposed snowmobile trail at Mount Carleton Provincial Park. If you're not sure what to say, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - NB Chapter has summarized some of our key messages here: http://cpawsnb.org/images/upload/key_messages_EIA.pdf

Please send comments or questions to: lynn.white@gnb.ca or mail to: Lynn White, Department of Tourism, Heritage and Culture, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1.
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