• Art for the environement: Charles Thériault's response to JDI television campaign

    Check out Charles Thériault’s new video. The power that an intense look and intelligent rhymes can have is truly impressive! The arts sure have their role to play in the environmental movement. Thanks to Charles Thériault for this interesting perspective on forest issues. Click here to watch the video.

  • Beau Bear & the Acadian Forest

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  • Briefing - conservation forest

    100_5789   Dear NBEN members and associates,

    The NBEN is organizing a briefing with the Department of Natural Resources for member and associate groups. The goal of the briefing will be to fully understand the proposed changes for the 2012-2017 Crown lands management plans.  These changes will reduce the existing level of conservation forest (30.4%) to either 23% or 25%.  The new level of conservation forest, slated to begin in 2012, was a decision taken by the last government, but the current government is considering whether to proceed with these changes or not.  There is strong opposition to the changes as the conservation forest includes stream buffer zones, deer wintering areas and old growth forest habitat.

    The briefing will take place on Tuesday, May 10, 9-11 a.m. in Fredericton. Mike Sullivan and Steve Gordon will represent the Department of Natural Resources.  If you are interested in participating, please advise the NBEN by Thursday, May 5.  Thank you, Mary Ann
  • Crown lands overcut - Wood quotas must be reduced

    CCNB Action - Jim Irving, President of J.D. Irving Ltd., has been travelling the province seeking support from business audiences for keeping the wood allocations to mills at 2007 levels.  The problem, according to CCNB Action’s Executive Director David Coon, is the forest on Crown land has been overcut and can no longer sustain such high quotas.


    “The amount of wood cut from Crown land in 2006-2007 was double what was cut in 1966-1967.  We have seen the amount of wood cut from Crown lands on a five-year average increase by roughly 80%  over the past 40 years from 2.7 million cubic metres per year in the late 1960’s to almost 5 million cubic metres in the past decade ,” said Coon.    “The bottom line is we have overcut the public forest so wood quotas have got to be reduced in 2012,” he said.  “The good news is private woodlot owners across this province have plenty of wood to sell that can make up the difference and create work at the same time,” said Coon.

    Half of New Brunswick’s forest is found on Crown land, while 30% of the forest is owned by private woodlot owners.

    Five Year Average    //    Volume of Wood Cut from Crown Land (millions of cubic metres)*
    1967-1972                      2.7 million cubic metres
    1972-1977                      3.7 million cubic metres
    1977-1982                      3.1 million cubic metres
    1982-1987                      3.5 million cubic metres
    1987-1992                      4.4 million cubic metres
    1992-1997                      4.4 million cubic metres
    1997-2002                      4.9 million cubic metres
    2002-2007                      8.0 million cubic metres

    *Data from DNR’s Timber Utilization Survey

    -30-

    Contact:  David Coon, 458-8747

  • Endangered Forest- Whaelghinbran Farm

    Come see why this property is so important.

    http://forestsinternational.org/projects/conservation-of-working-lands/

     

    Since early 2009, CFI has been working with organic farmers and sustainable woodlot owners Clark Philips and Susan Tyler, as well as the New Brunswick Community Land Trust (NBCLT), in order to develop a succession plan for a unique 650 acre farm and Acadian Forest woodlot called Whaelghinbran Farm. Clark (74) and Susan (72), have been farming organically and practicing ecological forestry on their woodlot for over 40 years. By carefully harvesting and marketing timber they have begun a process of restoration, working to achieve the health and diversity found within the Acadian Forest Eco-region prior to European settlement. In order to continue this legacy, Clark, Susan, CFI and the NBCLT are working to uphold the principles and techniques employed at Whaelghinbran Farm through a working lands conservation agreement. CFI intends to steward the farm and woodlot under the conservation easement with a community of interested organizations and individuals, and is striving to establish a rural training centre on site.This training centre will provide students from the region with the knowledge, skills, and network necessary to become involved in a movement rooted in ecologically-based working lands in the Acadian Forest Eco-region. The multi-stakeholder community-based ecological forestry practiced at Whaelghinbran will also provide a strong example of alternative approaches to woodland management in the region.

  • Forest bill threatens forest and obligates us to pay companies: CCNB

    The Conservation Council of New Brunswick is raising concerns with Bill 44, An Act to Amend the Crown Lands and Forest Act. The bill, which got Royal Assent today, June 10, amends the Act so that the government "shall compensate the licensee for other expenses of forest management in accordance with the regulations (Paragraph 38.2.b). The Act currently states that it "may reimburse the licensee for other expenses of forest management as may be provided for by regulation or by agreement."

    "We are concerned that changing the law to require the Minister to compensate forest companies opens the door wide open to pay pulp and paper companies for reductions in their wood allocations. Would this mean that we would be forced to pay companies for loss of revenue for environmental protection measures? Would this mean that the forest management requirement for wildlife habitat zones in which only selection cutting is permitted would make the licensee eligible to be compensated for the difference in cost between clearcutting and selection cutting? Would it mean that forestry companies could be compensated for the value of wood fibre unavailable to it?" stated David Coon, CCNB's Executive Director.

    The Department of Natural Resources will be reducing the annual allowable cut for softwoods and hardwoods on Crown lands in 2012 as the amount of softwood plantations were supposed to yield by now has not materialized, while hardwoods have been overcut.

    "It is rare that legislation actually removes the discretion of a Minister in New Brunswick, but that is what replacing the word 'may' with 'shall' accomplishes," stated Tracy Glynn, CCNB's Forest Campaigner.  "What is the justification for this?" Glynn asked. "We need to know what regulations are being contemplated."

    "Compensation is the holy grail that the Irving's have been seeking since they and other licensee's wrote the Minister demanding compensation back in 2001, which we obtained and leaked to the media. The resulting public outcry was deafening," added Coon. "Now we see compensation being written into the Crown Lands And Forest Act itself."

    Half of New Brunswick's forest is Crown land. The right to manage New Brunswick's 3.4 million hectares of publicly-held forests has been transferred to mostly multinational companies including J.D. Irving Ltd., Fornebu Lumber Company, Twin Rivers (formerly Fraser Papers) and AV Group (AV Nackawic/AV Cell).

    -30-

    David Coon, 458-8747
    Tracy Glynn, 458-8747
  • Forest Rally on May 10th

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  • NB Naturalist - Our Forests - Nos Forêts

    The special edition of the NB Naturalist -Our Forests - Nos Forêts, is available for free andentirely dedicated to our public forests—their role, the questions that have not been answered, and the potential problems this new plan poses for biodiversity, ecosystems, and the future of our forests. Contact Vanessa (executive.director@naturenb.ca) to get copies, or download a pdf at www.naturenb.ca.

  • New Brunswick Still a Laggard on Protected Areas – New Crown Forest Plan Step Backwards

    (Fredericton)  The Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, New Brunswick Chapter (CPAWS NB)  says the new Crown forest management plan announced today by the Minister of Natural Resources is a step backwards for conservation.

    Roberta Clowater, Executive Director of CPAWS NB, said, “The new Crown forest plan reduces the overall conservation of wildlife habitats and riverbank buffers.  This is disturbing because we know that wildlife researchers believe that current conservation levels may not be enough to maintain all the kinds of native wildlife throughout the province.  The government has now approved a plan to go even further below what is needed.  This is the wrong direction for conservation.”

    Clowater said, “While the plan approves an increase in protected areas from 4% of Crown forest to 8% of Crown forest, this will result in only 4.5% of the province being protected.  This is not even in the ballpark of what is needed to ensure conservation of our rivers, wilderness areas and sensitive wildlife.  New Brunswick will still have the lowest protected areas proportion in Canada, only above PEI.  As well, the new protected areas will come from the currently conserved old forest, so there is actually a net loss in area to conservation.”

    “Given concerns about climate changes and uncertainty about how well we are currently conserving habitats and water, we are very concerned about the decision to go from a 5 year plan to a 10 year plan.  We believe this is a risky move, one that locks us into very limited conservation objectives, and doesn’t provide the flexibility to improve conservation for another decade.”

    “CPAWS NB appreciates that the Minister took the time to review the forest plan approved by the previous government, which would have severely rolled back conservation on public land.  We’re pleased that the Minister consulted widely with the conservation community, and recognized the value of habitat conservation as in important factor in his considerations,” noted Clowater.

    CPAWS had recommended that at least 17% of Crown land (8.5% of the province), including the largest patches of old forest, be designated by 2015 in permanent protected areas, where no logging or mining would take place.  This amount would move us closer to the level in other provinces, where the average amount of land protected is nearly 9%.

    -30-

    Contact:

    Roberta Clowater, 506-452-9902; cpawsnb{at}nb.sympatico.ca

    CPAWS is New Brunswick’s voice for wilderness.  For more information on CPAWS NB and our conservation work, please visit www.cpawsnb.org

  • New Brunswick's Crown Forests: A Priceless Trust - Betrayed

    .


    This video examines the JD Irving and Government of New Brunswick
    Crown Land Forestry Plan and explains why it must be stopped.


    ‪- produced by the Green Party of New Brunswick‬



  • OBITUARY OF THE ACADIAN FOREST

    OBITUARY OF THE ACADIAN FOREST - With great sadness we mourn the sudden, tragic death of more than 12,600 acres/year of Acadian Forest which, until this year, had been placed in the care of its Trustee, the Province of New Brunswick, for heritage conservation purposes. The death was caused by a routine case of what the Province of New Brunswick calls “carefully managed clear cutting." The amount cut is equivalent to cutting Mactaquac Provincial Park 10 times every year and for the next 25 years.

    This part of New Brunswick's forest had been entrusted to the Province for perpetual care by rural and urban residents alike for the benefit of all generations. Felled by the tens of thousands, primarily along rivers and streams, the premature and suspicious death means this forest will no longer be able to provide much needed water flow, temperature and flood control.

    Along with more severe soil erosion and increased flooding in its communities, this tragic 'death by clear cutting' will further reduce fish populations, notably that of the pride of New Brunswick rivers, the Atlantic Salmon. As well, thousands of deer and countless other species of animals and plants associated with Old Growth Forests will now die because the shelter and food they need to survive that had been provided by the forest was, of course, also destroyed by the clear cut.

    The Acadian Forest is survived by a very distant relative, the Tree Plantation, unable to provide the same type of life-giving function of its now dead relative. Meanwhile, yet another 'unnatural death by clear cut' in New Brunswick is prompting calls for an inquest into what has been called the reckless endangerment of all the New Brunswick Forests by their Trustee, the Province. In a stunning admission, the Province of New Brunswick has admitted to openly colluding with serial clear cutters. Adding to the concern is the fact that the Forest estate was stripped of assets by 'serial clear cutters' before its death and so left nothing to the residents of New Brunswick.

    The dead forest, more than 10,000 years old and now gone forever, was predeceased by northern cod stocks off the Atlantic coast who also fell victim to "careful management" by their Trustees.

    In lieu of flowers and other tokens of mourning for this beloved member of New Brunswick's Natural Family, letters, e-mails, tweets and other expressions of outrage directed to Premier Brian Gallant, Natural Resources Minister Denis Landry, and your MLA are requested.

    Rest in peace Acadian Forest.
  • Peace and Friendship Alliance Demands Gallant Suspend Forestry Contracts and Consult With Indigenous Peoples

    PEACE & FRIENDSHIP ALLIANCE DEMANDS GALLANT SUSPEND
    FORESTRY 
    CONTRACTS AND CONSULT WITH INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE             PRESS RELEASE              23 MARCH 2015


    Fredericton NB - Members of the Peace & Friendship Alliance are alarmed at the Gallant government’s decision to honour forestry contracts that were signed without meaningful consultation.  

    The Alliance includes non-governmental groups and Indigenous Peoples from New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Maine, in collaboration with a national and international coalition, who are all concerned about mounting assaults on our land, water, and air by governments and industry.

    “The lands tied to those contracts are the stolen ancestral territory of our people,” says Ron Tremblay, spokesperson for Wolastoq Grand Council


    “The lands tied to those contracts are the stolen ancestral territory of our people,” says Ron Tremblay, spokesperson for Wolastoq Grand Council. “We see Brian Gallant’s endorsement of the contracts as abuse of due process. The contracts were signed without meaningful consultation with Indigenous People.”

    “Gallant should have announced he was going to suspend the contracts until Indigenous People were properly consulted,” adds Tremblay.

    “This is more of an incentive to take this government to court to finally recognize aboriginal title to the lands that have been given away for destruction,” says Alma Brooks, clan mother of the Wolastoq Grand Council.

    “This is more of an incentive to take this governmentto court to finally recognize aboriginal title to the landsthat have been given away for destruction,”says Alma Brooks, clan motherof the Wolastoq Grand Council

    Maggie Connell, co-chair of the Fredericton Chapter of the Council of Canadians, said “This forestry deal was done in secret without Wolastoq Peoples knowledge or ours.”

    “We want to prevent irreparable harm to Acadian forests which will not regenerate for hundreds of years,” adds Connell. “And after such severe weather this winter, our elected leaders can no longer hide from climate change. They have a duty of care to prevent widespread loss of forest cover. Many of these areas now allowed in the forestry contract are on steep slopes and wet areas that once cut, will not retain as much water after heavy rain events, thus increasing the risk of flooding in downstream communities.”

    “We want to prevent irreparable harm to Acadian forests
    which will not regenerate for hundreds of years”
    - Maggie Connell, co-chair of the Fredericton
    Chapter of the Council of Canadians



    A rally is being held outside the combined Annual General Meetings of three (3) NB Liberal Riding Associations this coming Wednesday, March 25th from 5:30pm to 7:00pm at Knights of Columbus Hall, 170 Regent Street, Fredericton to tell Brian Gallant to give us due process and suspend the forestry contracts through legislation. The public is invited to attend this family event.

    - 30 -
  • Planting Guide for a Climate Change Resilient Forest

    The UNESCO-designated Fundy Biosphere Reserve (FBR) has released the long awaited results of research into climate change-resilient tree species in southern New Brunswick.

    The FBR recently completed an analysis of which native tree species has the most chance to prosper under changing climatic conditions over the next 100 years, as well as those that will most probably merely persevere, and which could even decline. Northern trees species like spruces, fir, birches, and poplars will likely face more insects, disease, extreme weather, and competition, which would lead to slower growth and higher mortality. By contrast, southern species such as maples, oak, pines, beech, hemlock, and cherry should have a longer growing season and thus, faster growth. 

    The FBR has created a pamphlet that describes the eight ‘winners’ for the changing climate.  It describes the trees and their preferred growing conditions, so that woodlot owners, foresters, municipalities, and the general public are armed with the right information about what to plant and where

    As the climate changes and less-resilient species begin to decline and disappear, the Acadian Forest composition in southern New Brunswick (as well as throughout the Maritimes) will also change. This means that the forest as we know it today will later contain fewer of those northern species, and probably more of these “winners”. But the forest will need help from residents of the region, notably in planting these resilient species.

    By planning ahead for climate change and planting tree species that have a better chance to thrive, we can help ensure that there will be healthy and beautiful trees in our neighborhoods and parks as well as in the forest, to be enjoyed by generations to come. An informative brochure has thus been developed to help 

    The other component of this research is related to forest corridors. As climate change and deforestation affect the forest, wildlife can become cut-off.  The FBR is working with other organizations to try and establish forest corridors based on areas with climate change resilient trees, helping plants and animals move freely around the FBR or to and from Nova Scotia.

    More information on this project, including a detailed research report and maps showing current and projected forest composition within the Fundy Biosphere Reserve, is available at http://www.fundy-biosphere.ca/en/home/forests-of-the-future.html.
     
     
  • Scientists Concerned Upcoming New Brunswick Forestry Plan will Eliminate too Much Habitat

    Commentary - February 27, 2014
    Scientists Concerned Upcoming New Brunswick Forestry Plan will Eliminate too Much Habitat

    We are writing as a collective of concerned scientists and professionals who have spent many decades studying the needs of wildlife, healthy forests, and rivers in New Brunswick. Less than two years ago (March 2012), the Minister of Natural Resources announced a new 10-year Crown forest management plan that, while not acceptable to all, at least attempted to hold the line on keeping a minimum amount of habitat for wildlife, and appropriate buffers along rivers and streams. This was a plan that the Department developed after a year of consultation with wildlife researchers, forest companies, hunting and angling groups, environmental groups and First Nations. It was supposed to have set the amount of forest managed for conservation goals at 28% of the public forest. This was the bare minimum deemed necessary by government wildlife managers to make sure we have enough old forest to maintain healthy populations of our wildlife. The 2012 plan would have reduced clearcutting in certain Acadian mixed-forests, and reduced the amount of wood logged from hardwood stands to make sure there will be enough hardwoods to log in the future.

    We thought the 2012 plan was the path forward. Now we are deeply concerned to learn that a new plan has been in development behind the scenes, government is apparently ignoring previous recommendations from their own staff, and did not ask for input or feedback from wildlife researchers or others who could speak on behalf of the public’s stated priority values - water, wildlife and basic sustainability of the forest.

    The Premier in his 2014 State of the Province address, and Minister of Natural Resources in recent media interviews, both alluded to a new strategy that will allocate more wood to the province’s mills. Having not been part of the discussions that led to these decisions, we cannot be sure where this wood will come from. Since all Crown forest is already allocated, we are concerned the wood will come from buffer strips on brooks and wetlands, from deer yards, and from the small pockets of forest used to maintain wildlife and old forest. We are left to wonder if the wood will come from these previously conserved habitat areas, taking us below the minimums that are deemed necessary for wildlife and the health of our rivers. If this is what is being proposed, we believe it would be an irresponsible plan that will have serious negative consequences for the sustainability of our public forests for a long time to come.

    Roberta Clowater (Executive Director, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society-NB Chapter); Dr. Tom Beckley (Professor, Forestry and Environmental Management, UNB); Dr. Tony Diamond (Research Professor of Wildlife Ecology, Biology Dep’t and Faculty of Forestry & Environmental Management, UNB); Dr. Graham Forbes (Director, New Brunswick Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Centre, Faculty of Forestry and Environmental Management, Faculty of Science, UNB); Dr. Roger Roy (Professor and Interim Director, School of Forestry, UdeM); Dr. Marc-André Villard (Professor, Biology, Université de Moncton).

    www.cpawsnb.org



  • SSNB (StopSprayingNB) Petition Submission/ Présentation de la pétition SSNB

    SSNB needs your support us as we step forward to let our voices be heard. Join us at the Legislature for the submission of the SSNB petition signatories. Bring your loud voice and all the signs, noisemakers and conviction you can muster.

    SSNB petitions will be delivered to the Legislature May 18 at noon with over 10,000 signatures from people across the province. MLA's David Coon and Gilles LePage will accept the petitions. We need anyone who is able to come down and support the petition submission to join us in solidarity.

    It is time to act. 
    Please spread the word and thank you for your support..
    https://www.facebook.com/events/850055331766330/


    ------

    Le groupe nommé Stop Spraying New-Brunswick - Arrêter l'épandage d'herbicides au NB, a besoin de votre soutien pour faire entendre les 10,000 voix de citoyens à travers la province qui ont signé une pétition demandant au gouvernement de cesser cet épandage.

    Joignez nous à l'Assemblée législative le 18 mai à midi. La pétition sera présentée aux députés David Coon et Gilles LePage. Apportez votre voix forte, vos affiches et tous les gens que vous pouvez.

    Venez montrer votre appui et solidarité lors de la soumission de cette pétition.

    Il est temps d'agir.
    S'il vous plaît passer le mot et nous vous remercions pour votre soutien https://www.facebook.com/events/1373955082630042/




  • Take Action: Use of public land against the public’s wishes

    Public Forest Conservation Campaign – Fall 2011

    The provincial government will be deciding this fall whether to go ahead with the previous government’s plan for public forest use and conservation. The plan that was on the table would decrease the amount of forest that is managed specifically to conserve deer wintering habitat, old forests and stream bank buffer zones.

    Based upon what we have learned from the Department of Natural Resources, this could mean a reduction of as much as 25% (one quarter) of some of these habitats. At the same time, the amount of plantations on public land would be increased to 28% of Crown forest.

    The new Minister of Natural Resources has announced he will re-examine the previous plan this fall, and will announce a new forest plan after December.

    New Brunswickers have rejected this before

    The majority of the public told the Select Committee on Wood Supply in 2004 that they do not want fish and wildlife habitat to be sacrificed to increase wood supply. The Select Committee rejected industry’s request to put a cap on conservation zones, and instead recommended that the amount of clear-cutting be reduced.

    A 2007 survey of the New Brunswick public showed that the overwhelming majority of people surveyed place highest priority on the forest’s protection of fresh water, air and wildlife habitat (Public views on forest management in New Brunswick: Report from a provincial survey).

    Both the Select Committee hearings and the survey of New Brunswickers showed that our citizens expect government to stand up for what the people want, and to work with the natural forest we have.

    The public also expressed they want more say in how forests are managed. Government has still not implemented any real public consultation strategy to involve the public in the public’s forest.

    Will the government listen this time? We think yes.

    We believe there is a real opening for New Brunswickers to speak up on behalf of our forests once again. This is a new government, and the Minister said he wants to hear more from conservationists and First Nations.

    Please write a letter that tells government what is important to you about our forest, and what you expect government to do.

    Send your letter to: Bruce Northrup, Minister of Natural Resources, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1, and a copy to your MLA. We can provide a list of MLAs if you are not sure.

    Make a short version of your letter and send it as a letter to the editor to your local newspaper, or one of the daily newspapers.

    If you are part of a community group or NGO that would like to invite one of us to speak to your group on this topic (to answer questions, provide more detail), please contact us, as below.

    For more information, please contact forest@ccnbaction.ca. More detailed information can be found on the following web sites: www.acadianforest.ca; www.cpawsnb.org.

    Prepared by Crown Lands Network steering committee (CCNB Action, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society-NB Chapter, Meduxnekeag River Society, Nature NB, Public for the Protection of the Forests of NB), a caucus of the NB Environmental Network.

  • The clock is ticking for New Brunswick's nature - Take Action Now

    We've been waiting over a year since many hundreds of people who care about New Brunswick's wilderness submitted comments to the provincial government on a proposal for new protected natural areas. The candidate areas included old forests, sensitive wildlife habitats, and wild rivers located in all corners of New Brunswick. More than a year later, the province still hasn’t announced what will happen with those candidate areas and while we wait for them to decide, industrial development approvals are proceeding at a rapid pace.

    We need your help to keep the pot boiling so these proposed protected areas don’t drop off the province’s agenda. Please take a moment right now to send a simple letter to the Minister of Natural Resources, asking about the status of these candidate protected areas.

    Take Action Now - Go to this link to write a letter: http://org.salsalabs.com/o/2463/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=14746kedgwick river small

    Currently, only 3% of New Brunswick is under any form of permanent protection. With your help, we can change that.Take action today!

  • Upper Miramichi Forest Festival

    The Rural Community of Upper Miramichi, Central NB Woodmen’s Museum and the Conservation Council of New Brunswick are proud to present the Upper Miramichi Forest Festival on Sunday, August 21st from 11am-4pm at the Woodmen’s Museum and Upper Miramichi Community Park (6342 Route 8, Boiestown). The first ever forest festival will also mark the official opening of the Upper Miramichi Community Park.

    The forest festival will feature:

    Morning run with the Miramichi River Runners

    Wild blueberry pancake brunch

    Vendors displaying wild berry jams & jellies, fiddleheads, crafts, wreaths and soaps.

    A “Taste of Metepenagiag Tour” with berry teas and a demonstration of sealing a birch bark canoe with spruce gum.

    Learn how to make cedar shingles, inoculate logs for shitake mushrooms and make soap.

    Laugh out loud at a play by the The Saplings Theatre Production.

    Join a forest scavenger hunt designed for all ages and learn how to identify the variety of flora and food in our forest.

    Enjoy a game of horseshoes or washers, face-painting, tours of the Museum grounds and forest games for kids.

    Learn about Upper Miramichi’s community forest initiatives. Check out a showcase of maps of Upper Miramichi’s forest produced by Mojo Mapping, Fundy Model Forest, the Rural Municipality of Upper Miramichi & the Conservation Council. Videos and literature on community forestry initiatives will be on hand for you to check out.

    Enjoy a great day with family and friends and discover the many wonders and opportunities that our forest provides.

    For more information, visit Upper Miramichi Community Forest Partnership at http://www.uppermiramichic​ommunityforest.org/

    Detailed schedule coming soon!

  • VOICE OF THE PEOPLE TOUR: Red Dot Poll Results for Rexton NB and area May 14 2014

    VOICE OF THE PEOPLE TOUR: Red Dot Poll Results for Rexton NB and area May 14 2014

    Two hundred and more enthusiastic and engaged people from the Rexton and Kent County areas attended a standing room-only Voice of the People Tour stop at the Bonar Law High School Wednesday evening.

    Aboriginal, Acadian, English and other friends and neighbours spoke their minds on the issue of fracking and how they choose to take a stand in rejecting the shale gas industry while pursuing viable and locally-based solutions and alternatives to our 'Dig it Up, Cut it Down, Ship it Out'economy.


    Below are the results of the VOICE OF THE PEOPLE TOUR Red Dot Poll for Rexton NB

    1. People of NB will not stand by and allow this (fracking) to happen (112 dots)

    2. Boycott Irving (83 dots)

    3. More emphasis on food security for Kent County (64 dots)

    4. On election day make a statement by voting for a party opposed to fracking (59 dots)

    5. SLAPP suits by SWN (South Western Energy) are unacceptable and will be challenged by individuals and by class action (53 dots)

    6. Honour Aboriginal land and rights (51 dots)

    7. Exploration test wells need to be opposed/stopped. "We have to stop before they drill" (36 dots)

    8. We need to get behind local & provincial politicians who have opposed shale gas (33 dots)

    9. Tools and incentives (e.g. community economic development investment funds) need to be made more available to assist communities to develop renewable energy programs (29 dots)

    10. Greater transparency from government regarding costs incurred from shale gas industry (impacts to air quality, water quality, public health, road maintenance, etc.) (18 dots)

    11. Organized tours of Penobsquis are available. It is important that we see and smell what the industry creates (17 dots)

    12. Speak out not only for yourself but for your wider community (11 dots)

    13. Phased environmental impact assessments (EIA) will be ineffective tools of a regulatory process (9 dots)

    14. Make personal submissions or complaints if medical conditions are potentially at risk by operations that may be planned to happen near or around your community (4 dots)

    15. Challenge the establishment and their use of words to obscure the truth & take away our rights (2 dots)
  • VOICE OF THE PEOPLE TOUR: Red Dot Poll Results for Sussex NB and area May 8 2014

    VOICE OF THE PEOPLE TOUR: Red Dot Poll Results for Sussex NB and area May 8 2014


    1)  NB's democratic deficit is stifling our ability to have an effective public voice to counter government and industry control

    2)  Something needs to be done about corporate media control in NB

    3)  We need better transparency about what has been happening in Penobsquis

    4)  (Tie)
         - Stop subsidizing large corporations
         - Regulations will not protect us

    5)  NB needs more emphasis on sustainable industry incentives

    6)  Proportional representation is needed for electoral reform

    7)  (Tie)
        - Community economic development investment funds and other investment tools are needed to support local community development
        - Concern for lack of accurate information and industry truth

    8) Reduce toxins - Take NB out of a sacrifice zone