Ken Hardie passed away on April 1, 2016.  Ken was dedicated to NB forests and worked tirelessly for improvements to forest policy. Through this work, he built strong links with people in the environmental community from across the province. He was executive director of the NB Federation of Woodlot Owners, and involved in the Southern New Brunswick Wood Co-op, the SNB Marketing Board and the SNB Working Woodlot program. Ken was a founding member of the New Brunswick Community Land Trust. Ken will be profoundly missed by all who are working on forest issues. Our condolences go to his family and friends.



Obituary

Kenneth Thomas Laing Hardie
1953-2016

Ken Hardie of Kars, NB, loving husband of Deborah Boles, passed away peacefully on April 1, 2016 at Saint John Regional Hospital. Born August 22, 1953, in Montreal, Ken was the son of John Laing Hardie (Selkirk, MB) and the late Alice Thompson.

Ken grew up in Dollard des Ormeaux, QC, attended high school in Pointe Claire, and university at Sir George Williams in Montreal. In 1971 Ken migrated east to study science and play varsity football at UNB where he made lifelong friendships. After university, Ken put down Maritime roots. He remained in Fredericton where he managed the UNB Student Union and played for the infamous Atlantic Rentals hockey team. However, his life soon changed when he fell in love and married Deborah Boles in 1981. The newlyweds moved to a 230 year old farmhouse in Kars on Belleisle Bay. It was here that Ken found his passion - the forest. He developed a Fundy Model woodlot on his farm and began a storied career in forestry in which he held many positions: executive director of the NB Federation of Woodlot Owners, and leadership roles in the Southern New Brunswick Wood Co-op, the SNB Marketing Board and the SNB Working Woodlot program. Ken was a proud founding member of the New Brunswick Community Land Trust.

Ken Hardie was a humble man of character and integrity who possessed a fine sense of humour. He earned the respect and admiration of all who knew him. He was passionate about environmental stewardship, nature and wildlife. His love of animals, especially his many hounds and cats, was legendary, but above all it was Deborah, his friends and family that mattered most. He will be missed. Ken was predeceased by his cherished Bernese Mountain Dog, Addie.

Besides his wife of 35 years, Ken is survived by his father; sister, Margaret (Gerald Beaudoin) of Havelock, QC; brother, Robert Hardie (Lynn Charette) of Halifax, NS; and brother-in-law, David Boles of Fredericton. Ken was the loving uncle of Mathiew and the late Jean-Luke Beaudoin; and Tyler, Jordyn and Austyn Hardie. He was much loved by cousins, Anne Maura and Mary Alice.

A memorial gathering will be held at McAdam’s Funeral Home on Wednesday, April 6th, 2016, from 1:00 to 5:00 pm. Word of remembrance to celebrate Ken’s life will occur at 3:00 pm followed by a reception. For those who wish, donations may be made in Ken’s memory to the New Brunswick Community Land Trust, the SPCA or a charity of the donor’s choice.

www.mcadamsfh.com

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Action Alerts

Resquest for letters of support: Proposed name restoration for the Wolastoq

Sunday, 30 April 2017
by Alma
 The Wolastoq Grand Council supports our YOUTH GROUPS on their proposal for changing the name of the Saint John River, back to it’s original and proper name; Wolastoq (the beautiful & bountiful river ). We see this as a good place to begin the process of implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; which was strongly recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.  

Proposed Name Restoration: 
  • The name Saint John River back to it’s original indigenous name -  Wolastoq
Purpose: 
  • Wolastoq; (the beautiful river) is the original Indigenous name of the River.
  • Wolastoq is the name sake for the real identity and unique nationality of our People; the Wolastoqiyik.  Respecting the rights of Wolastoqiyik.
  • Scientific studies have now confirmed, what our people have always known; “that water has memory”.    This river will remember its original name.   
  • This deed would begin a process for reconciliation with a show of goodwill on the part of the Government of New Brunswick, and would;
  • Create opportunities for discussions and engagement around indigenous issues.
  • Wolastoqiyik have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons. 

The Wolastoq Grand Council is requesting support letters from our Allies; as individuals, organizations, and/or Groups.  For more information, contact Alma Brooks, 506-478-1256, almabrooks.26@outlook.com

Please send support letters to the following addresses:

The Wolastoq Grand Council,
Grand Chief; Ron Tremblay
50 Maliseet Drive
Fredericton, NB, E3A 2V9


David Coon
Office of the Green Party Leader
P.O. Box 6000
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1

Additional Information

  1. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
Carolyn Bennett; Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; has assured the Wolastoq Grand Council in writing that; - “Canada is committed to a renewed nation to nation relationship with indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership.”   Carolyn Bennett also stated that ; - “Achieving full reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Canada is at the heart of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s mandate, and that the government of “Canada will engage with Indigenous peoples, provinces, territories, and Canadians on how to implement the Declaration in accordance with Canada’s Constitution”.

  1. Andrea Bear-Nicholas
As described in a 2011 article by Andrea Bear-Nicholas, Maliseet historian:  
  1. The first step in the dispossession for the indigenous peoples in the Maritimes began in earnest immediately after the British capture of the French fort at Louisbourg in 1758.   Where place names and names of First Nations in the entire region had been inscribed on earlier maps; both would soon be erased by colonial cartographers in a process described by J. B. Harley as cartographic colonialism.  The justifications for these erasures was found in the doctrine of discovery.   
  2. The second step in the dispossession of indigenous peoples in Nova Scotia began immediately after signing of the Treaty of 1760 by Passamaquoddy and Maliseet Leaders, and later the signing of the Mascarene Treaty.   Although there was no surrender of any lands in either of these Treaties; 1.5 million acres of Maliseet land which outlawed the surveying and expropriation of lands not yet ceded by the indigenous inhabitants or purchased by the Crown.    


  3. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:   Articles 1, 2, 6, & 13   support and provide a guide for the implementation leading to reconciliation.

As a distinct ‘people,’ we have a right to our accurate identity and nationality.
  • Indigenous Peoples have the right to the full enjoyment as a collective or as individuals of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and international human rights law. 
  • Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin and identity. 
  • Every indigenous individual has the right to their own nationality. 
  • Indigenous people have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons.  “States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected”.

ACTION ALERT: Reinstate funding to the Canadian Environmental Network

Friday, 03 February 2017
by Raissa Marks
The Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks need your help!

Historically, the Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks including the NBEN received annual core funding from the Government of Canada. This was used to facilitate networking on environmental issues across the country, coordinate national and provincial issue-based caucuses, coordinate ENGO participation in federal public consultation processes, and maintain open lines of communication between ENGOs and the federal government.

In 2011, as part of the across-the-board cuts to civil society organizations by the previous federal government, all federal funding to the RCEN and its provincial affiliate networks was cut. This left the national network and most of the affiliates with functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work.

There is hope that the current government will provide for renewed funding in its upcoming budget. This funding is crucial for the survival of the national network and many of the provincial affiliate networks. A proposal has been submitted. It now needs strong and immediate support from environmental groups and individuals across the country.

This is where you come in!

Please take a few minutes to write to Prime Minister Trudeau and your MP telling them why you value the RCEN, your provincial affiliate network, or environmental networking at the national level in general. Feel free to use the template letter provided below. You can personalize it based on your experience or simply copy and paste.

Trudeau’s email is justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca and you can find your MP’s email here: http://www.parl.gc.ca/Parliamentarians/en/members

Let’s show our federal politicians that a strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada!

Draft Template Letter:

Dear Prime Minister Trudeau,

I am writing to ask that annual core funding to the Canadian Environmental Network (RCEN) be reinstated.

Historically, the RCEN provided a crucial link between environmental groups across the country, both large and small. This link was vital in helping communities address environmental issues right across the country and ensuring a robust approach to the development of environmental policy in Canada.

Since funding was cut in 2011, the RCEN and most of its provincial affiliate networks have been functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work. This is not acceptable. A strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada. I urge you to reinstate core funding for this crucial work immediately.

Sincerely,
Ken Hardie