Over the past six weeks or so, the NBEN has brought together groups from across the province to develop a joint submission to the Education Plan Secretariat that focuses on integrating sustainability education into our K-12 education system.  We are super excited about the resulting document, which provides a great framework for transforming our education system for a sustainable future.

This idea was born out of the most recent Sustainability Education Alliance conference, which was held at the end of October.

Click here to read the submission.

Live Wild Eng Bilingual

The Communications Team of the Biodiversity Collaborative has been working hard to develop a logo – and the final product is gorgeous. The logo was developed to help create awareness of the importance of New Brunswick’s biodiversity and to build public interest in preserving it. This logo can be used by all collaborative partner organizations to demonstrate solidarity and connect various efforts to advance biodiversity conservation, stewardship, and education. The logo is intended to supplement organizations’ brands by demonstrating a collaborative spirit.

Everyone is invited to use this logo!

  • Put it on your website and highlight your biodiversity work
  • Raise awareness through your social media and enhance your brand
  • Use it in your education materials and celebrate nature
Kudos to everyone who was involved in developing this logo!

Check out all the versions – and then get on board to build a brand for NB biodiversity!

This year marks the 10th anniversary for the NB Children’s Environmental Health Collaborative!  And to feature this event, we are hosting a workshop "Children's Health, Equity and the Environment: Creating Action" which looks at the issue through a new lens that brings together health, equity and the environment.  The workshop is themed around the questions:

What are the links between social inequity, the environment and children’s health?
What actions can happen, now on the ground, to immediately improve health outcomes for NB children?

Highlights

·         Experiential learning – a child-led tour of where North End Saint John children live and play
·         Children’s Health, Social Equity and Environment Fair

Speakers

·         Children's Health and the Environment - The Problem and the Solution, Philip Landrigan, Professor of Preventive Medicine and Pediatrics and Dean for Global Health, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY
·         Serious about equity? Thinking and working differently, Jeffrey Masuda, Director,  The Centre for Environmental Health Equity, and
Associate Professor, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies and Department of Geography, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario
·         Making our towns and cities healthier, Anne Roué Le Gall, Professor, Ecole des hautes études en santé publique, Rennes, France
·         NB Snap Shot: Associations and Trending, Michelina Mancuso, Executive Director of Performance Measurement, NB Health Council

Round Table

How is equity linked to children's health, socially, economically and environmentally?
What can be done?

Moderator: Bernard Richard

Round Table Contributors:
·         Jennifer Carhart, Principal, Princess Elizabeth School
·         Randy Hatfield, Executive Director, Human Development Council
·         Rob Moir, Professor of Economics and the Chair of the Department of Social Sciences, UNBSJ
·         Silvia Borsic, Executive Director, Saint John Family Resource Centre

Join us as we envision a different future for children’s health in New Brunswick. We will dream, and then we will get down to brass tacks and work together to determine real actions.

For more information and to register: http://www.nben.ca/index.php/en/cycling-article-event-01-nb-children-s-environmental-health-workshop

Brought to you by the organizing committee:

Barb McKinnon, NB Lung Association
Brigitte Lapointe, Health Canada
Céline Surette, Université de Moncton
Karen White-Masry, Scott Giffin and Todd Arsenault, NB Department of Health
Mary Ann Coleman, NB Environmental Network
Mary Britten-Belding, VON- Healthy Baby and Me
Mélanie LeBlanc, NB Department of Environment
Sharon Murphy, PEACE-NB
According to a recent survey, cross-sectoral collaboration is increasingly regarded as the key driver of progress towards sustainability, more so than public-private partnerships, leadership and innovation forums, and other approaches. Here in New Brunswick, the NBEN brings together partners from a wide variety of sectors to address the complex sustainability issues we face. The sum is greater than the parts – by working together, more can be achieved than by each organization working in its own silo.

Another interesting finding from the survey is that experts believe that multinational companies will be the key drivers of broad-scale collaborations to advance sustainability. I wonder if this will be the case in New Brunswick?

The survey also compared and contrasted corporations and NGOs and the drivers that propel each to become involved in sustainable development.

Two groups in the US, Sustain Ability and Globe Scan surveyed sustainability experts from around the world. The resulting report came out in February.

Last month, the Canadian Energy Strategy Working Group, of which NB Premier Brian Gallant is one of the co-chairs, announced the Canadian Energy Strategy. The intent of this strategy is to provide a framework for provinces and territories to work together on common energy-related interests.

While the strategy speaks to climate change quite a bit, it does so in a rather non-committal manner. For example, energy efficiency and conservation is an area of focus in the strategy, but so is “Develop and enhance a modern, reliable, environmentally safe and efficient series of transmission and transportation networks for domestic and export/import sources of energy”. Sounds like pipelines to me. The strategy also discusses transitioning to a lower-carbon economy (not a low-carbon economy). 

What does all this really mean? To me, the strategy is so broad that it could mean anything to anyone. But, don’t take it from me. Check it out for yourself here.

The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment has recently published an Implementation Framework for Climate Change Adaptation Planning at a Watershed Scale.The Framework lists seven steps through which a group of individuals can come together to assess and manage vulnerabilities and risks stemming from climate change at a watershed level. 

It is expected that the impacts of climate change on Canada’s water resources will be significant. Whether you are involved directly or indirectely with climate change adaptation and/or watersheds, or are just concerned about our water resources' well being, it's definitely worth checking out! 

Click here to consult the framework. Also available in the Climate Change Adaptation section of our Reference Library (under the "Resources" tab).

 
Are you interested in knowing more about the various projects linked to climate change adaptation around the province this year? Look no further! 

On June 24th, the NBEN held a workshop for ENGOs around climate change adaptation. A total of 12 ENGOs as well as a few other organizations were represented. Over the course of the day, the participants were able to map out adaptation in the province, network with other climate change adaptation enthusiast to exchange tools and resources, and to make the links in between the various projects to be implemented over the next year.

Following the workshop, the data was compiled and transformed into interactive maps. They are now available on our website! Click here to consult them.  

The report from the workshop is also available here.  

Enjoy! 
Do you buy local? Wish there were more options for local food and beverages?

The provincial government is developing a local food and beverage strategy and they are looking for input from New Brunswickers about their local food buying habits. The survey includes questions about the importance of supporting local producers, where local food is purchased and what can be done to improve accessibility of local food and beverages for consumers.

Check out the survey here and background information about the government’s buy local initiative can be found here.

BOMW Vote Now
The NBEN’s Branch Out, Make Waves is a province-wide challenge that encourages youth and community groups to team up and take on a tree-planting and shoreline clean-up conservation project. To help raise awareness on conservation in the province, the youth groups participated in a photo and video challenge.

Together, the groups from around the province planted 1351 trees and cleaned 18 hectares of shoreline!

While the challenge ended on June 15th, you can still support them! The prizes categories are Challenge Favourite, Most Creative Artwork, Best 2 minute eco-documentary, Weirdest Item Cleaned up, and Best Teamwork. We want you to vote for Challenge Favourite!

Vote by clicking the “up” arrow at the bottom of the post for Challenge Favourite. The more votes a project has, the higher up on the page it will be. On the deadline, the publication at the top of the page will win a special prize. Voting for Challenge Favourite closes on June 22nd, so make sure your voice is heard!

You can vote HERE!

Thank you for supporting youth and community conservation efforts!
On March 30, 2015, New Brunswick citizens representing a wide range of sectors met in Fredericton to develop ideas and discuss opportunities for forest management options in New Brunswick. The report from that conference is now available online.

The event was organized in response to concerns about potential biodiversity loss under the Forest Management Strategy that was announced in March 2014. Simply put, the goal of the conference was to identify opportunities, solutions, and next steps and to provide these to the government.

During the day, the level of expertise and know-how about both the forest economy and biodiversity was impressive, for its depth and its breadth. The highlight of the day was the Round Table, a panel of experts who raised key questions and generated new ideas. Throughout the course of the day participants contributed to expert ideas and it was exciting to see fresh thinking get posted on the wall! Throughout the course of the day opportunities were identified in three key areas:

• protecting forest biodiversity in NB;
• improving the economic approach to forests; and
• modernizing public policy for Crown lands.



The event was hosted by the Biodiversity Collaborative Steering Committee. Thank you to all the presenters, participants and those who volunteered on site during the day. 

Click here to read the report.


Blog Archives


This blog is for news and opinion pieces by staff.
The views expressed in these articles are the author’s personal opinion and not those of the NBEN or its member or associate groups.

Upcoming Events


Peace and Friendship Alliance Gathering
Fri, Nov 24th, 2017


A Tale of Two Necessities: Children and Resource Development
Tue, Nov 28th, 2017
New Maryland

Deadline for ETF submission
Thu, Nov 30th, 2017

Action Alerts

Have your say on Draft Water Strategy!

Wednesday, 15 November 2017
by Conservation Council of New Brunswick
A Water Strategy for New Brunswick

On October 6, 2017, the department of Environment and Local Government released a draft water strategy for comments. The draft strategy is available on the government website. Comments can be submitted by email to: waterstrategy-strategiedeleau@gnb.ca or by mail to: Department of Environment and Local Government, Policy and Planning Division, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, N.B., E3B 5H1. Comments will be accepted until November 20, 2017.

In order to help groups with their submissions, the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, in cooperation with watershed groups, has put together key elements of a watershed strategy and a sample letter to send to the Department.

Summary​ ​of​ ​8​ ​Key​ ​Elements​ ​of​ ​a​ ​Strong​ ​Water​ ​Protection​ ​Strategy

New​ ​Brunswick​ ​deserves​ ​a​ ​water​ ​protection​ ​strategy​ ​that:
    1. is​​ ​​science-based;​ ​(involving​ ​baseline​ ​data,​ ​tracking​ ​and​ ​taking​ ​into​ ​consideration cumulative​ ​impacts,​ ​environmental​ ​flows)
    2. sets​ ​water​ ​quality​ ​standards​ ​within​ ​a​ ​working,​ ​legal​ ​mechanism;
    3. conserves​ ​all​ ​water​ ​within​ ​​watersheds​ ​including​ ​surface​ ​waters​ ​(lakes,​ ​streams,​ ​rivers) and​ ​groundwater,​ ​by​ ​developing​ ​good​ ​conservation​ ​plans,​ ​policies​ ​and​ ​practices,​ ​and uses​ ​the​ ​precautionary​ ​principle​ ​as​ ​a​ ​guiding,​ ​legally​ ​enforceable​ ​tool;
    4. protects​ ​our​ ​marine​ ​coastal​ ​areas​ ​in​ ​law;
    5. has​ ​a​ ​meaningful​ ​form​ ​of​ ​​co-governance​ ​with​ ​First​ ​Nations;
    6. includes​ ​the​ ​development,​ ​implementation​ ​and​ ​enforcement​ ​of​ ​watershed​ ​protection plans,​ ​developed​ ​in​ ​a​ ​transparent​ ​manner,​ ​involving​ ​government,​ ​businesses,​ ​watershed organizations,​ ​farmers,​ ​municipal​ ​officials,​ ​and​ ​citizens;
    7. is​ ​accountable,​ ​which​ ​includes​ ​ongoing​ ​monitoring​ ​and​ ​annual​ ​reporting​ ​to​ ​the​ ​public​ ​on the​ ​progress​ ​of​ ​goals​ ​and​ ​objectives​ ​outlined​ ​in​ ​the​ ​water​ ​protection​ ​strategy;​ ​and,
    8. is​​ ​enforceable​ ​through​ ​a​ ​modern​ ​legal​ ​framework
Sample Letter
 My name is ______, and I am writing to express my support for a strong Water Strategy in New Brunswick.

I live near ______ OR I live in ___________ watershed

Describe your favourite spot to fish/swim/paddle etc.

Share your favourite water memory.

Clean, healthy water is important to me because _____________.

Have you recently experienced a boil water order? Blue-green algae? Extreme weather? Describe what is of concern to you.

I applaud the provincial government for moving forward on its commitment to protecting our water; however I believe the draft strategy does not go far enough to ensure healthy water for my watershed.

We need a water protection strategy that (Insert one or multiple key elements).

I am afraid that if left unattended, my watershed will face ongoing and increasing treats from (pollution, wetland and coastal estuary loss, loss of adequate environmental flow to sustain aquatic life, and increasing climate change impacts such as floods, droughts, and high temperatures.)

Please protect my watershed by implementing a strong water protection strategy with modern legislation that (note key element(s)) to ensure the health of our water and people.

Thank you,
Your name.

For more information, visit the CCNB's website.

Call for nominations for the NBEN Awards - 2017

Monday, 31 July 2017
by Annika Chiasson
Every day people and environmental groups take action to protect and restore New Brunswick’s environment.  

Over this past year, who stands out in your mind? 

We invite you to nominate a group or individual deserving of one of the NBEN awards which will be presented in style at Eco-Confluence 2017.  Send an e-mail to nben@nben.ca describing your nominee’s work.  Nominees must be members or associates of the NBEN*.

Nomination deadline is September 13, 2017.

*Current NBEN Steering Committee members are not eligible for awards.
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