According to a recent survey, cross-sectoral collaboration is increasingly regarded as the key driver of progress towards sustainability, more so than public-private partnerships, leadership and innovation forums, and other approaches. Here in New Brunswick, the NBEN brings together partners from a wide variety of sectors to address the complex sustainability issues we face. The sum is greater than the parts – by working together, more can be achieved than by each organization working in its own silo.

Another interesting finding from the survey is that experts believe that multinational companies will be the key drivers of broad-scale collaborations to advance sustainability. I wonder if this will be the case in New Brunswick?

The survey also compared and contrasted corporations and NGOs and the drivers that propel each to become involved in sustainable development.

Two groups in the US, Sustain Ability and Globe Scan surveyed sustainability experts from around the world. The resulting report came out in February.

Last month, the Canadian Energy Strategy Working Group, of which NB Premier Brian Gallant is one of the co-chairs, announced the Canadian Energy Strategy. The intent of this strategy is to provide a framework for provinces and territories to work together on common energy-related interests.

While the strategy speaks to climate change quite a bit, it does so in a rather non-committal manner. For example, energy efficiency and conservation is an area of focus in the strategy, but so is “Develop and enhance a modern, reliable, environmentally safe and efficient series of transmission and transportation networks for domestic and export/import sources of energy”. Sounds like pipelines to me. The strategy also discusses transitioning to a lower-carbon economy (not a low-carbon economy). 

What does all this really mean? To me, the strategy is so broad that it could mean anything to anyone. But, don’t take it from me. Check it out for yourself here.

The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment has recently published an Implementation Framework for Climate Change Adaptation Planning at a Watershed Scale.The Framework lists seven steps through which a group of individuals can come together to assess and manage vulnerabilities and risks stemming from climate change at a watershed level. 

It is expected that the impacts of climate change on Canada’s water resources will be significant. Whether you are involved directly or indirectely with climate change adaptation and/or watersheds, or are just concerned about our water resources' well being, it's definitely worth checking out! 

Click here to consult the framework. Also available in the Climate Change Adaptation section of our Reference Library (under the "Resources" tab).

 
Are you interested in knowing more about the various projects linked to climate change adaptation around the province this year? Look no further! 

On June 24th, the NBEN held a workshop for ENGOs around climate change adaptation. A total of 12 ENGOs as well as a few other organizations were represented. Over the course of the day, the participants were able to map out adaptation in the province, network with other climate change adaptation enthusiast to exchange tools and resources, and to make the links in between the various projects to be implemented over the next year.

Following the workshop, the data was compiled and transformed into interactive maps. They are now available on our website! Click here to consult them.  

The report from the workshop is also available here.  

Enjoy! 
Do you buy local? Wish there were more options for local food and beverages?

The provincial government is developing a local food and beverage strategy and they are looking for input from New Brunswickers about their local food buying habits. The survey includes questions about the importance of supporting local producers, where local food is purchased and what can be done to improve accessibility of local food and beverages for consumers.

Check out the survey here and background information about the government’s buy local initiative can be found here.

BOMW Vote Now
The NBEN’s Branch Out, Make Waves is a province-wide challenge that encourages youth and community groups to team up and take on a tree-planting and shoreline clean-up conservation project. To help raise awareness on conservation in the province, the youth groups participated in a photo and video challenge.

Together, the groups from around the province planted 1351 trees and cleaned 18 hectares of shoreline!

While the challenge ended on June 15th, you can still support them! The prizes categories are Challenge Favourite, Most Creative Artwork, Best 2 minute eco-documentary, Weirdest Item Cleaned up, and Best Teamwork. We want you to vote for Challenge Favourite!

Vote by clicking the “up” arrow at the bottom of the post for Challenge Favourite. The more votes a project has, the higher up on the page it will be. On the deadline, the publication at the top of the page will win a special prize. Voting for Challenge Favourite closes on June 22nd, so make sure your voice is heard!

You can vote HERE!

Thank you for supporting youth and community conservation efforts!
On March 30, 2015, New Brunswick citizens representing a wide range of sectors met in Fredericton to develop ideas and discuss opportunities for forest management options in New Brunswick. The report from that conference is now available online.

The event was organized in response to concerns about potential biodiversity loss under the Forest Management Strategy that was announced in March 2014. Simply put, the goal of the conference was to identify opportunities, solutions, and next steps and to provide these to the government.

During the day, the level of expertise and know-how about both the forest economy and biodiversity was impressive, for its depth and its breadth. The highlight of the day was the Round Table, a panel of experts who raised key questions and generated new ideas. Throughout the course of the day participants contributed to expert ideas and it was exciting to see fresh thinking get posted on the wall! Throughout the course of the day opportunities were identified in three key areas:

• protecting forest biodiversity in NB;
• improving the economic approach to forests; and
• modernizing public policy for Crown lands.



The event was hosted by the Biodiversity Collaborative Steering Committee. Thank you to all the presenters, participants and those who volunteered on site during the day. 

Click here to read the report.


June 4, 2015
For immediate release

NB Green Pages Launched for World Environment Day

Button Greenpages
Moncton – In celebration of World Environment Day on June 5, the New Brunswick Environmental Network (NBEN) is launching Green Pages, a searchable on-line directory of more than 80 non-profit environmental groups in New Brunswick.

“Green Pages is the who’s who for New Brunswick environmental issues. It will help people across the province connect with community environmental groups in their region,” said Raissa Marks, Executive Director of the NBEN. “We are launching this on World Environment Day as an invitation to all New Brunswickers to step forward and join with groups in their region.”

Community-based environmental groups are found in every corner of the province. These groups work hard to protect and restore the environment and educate the public, but also have fun enjoying nature with one another. “Nature NB has eight affiliated clubs in the province,” said Vanessa Roy MacDougall, Nature NB, a member group of the NBEN, “and Green Pages will help the public get involved with us.”

“Green Pages is going to be very helpful to young people like myself who are interested in environmental issues,” said Chloé Mélanson, of Vertige, the student environmental group at Mathieu-Martin High School. “It will now be so easy to find a group to volunteer with or to join.”

“Green Pages will help people become more involved in environmental issues, and in their local communities,” said Amanda Marlin, of EOS Eco-Energy in the Tantramar area. “Whatever their environmental interests, and wherever they are in the province, New Brunswickers will be able to find a group with which to connect.”

“It’s surprising to find over 80 community-based environmental groups in a small province. From my perspective, this is because we are a rural province and people have deep connections to the land and their communities. They want to preserve and protect them. For the NBEN, supporting this drive to preserve and protect is key to our mission,” stated Marks. “Green Pages will provide an important link. What issue is close to your heart? Use Green Pages to find others who are like-minded.”

Green Pages is searchable by organization name or acronym, environmental issues addressed, location and geographical scope, and language of service. For each group, contact information is provided, as well as its purpose, activities, and services available to the public. Green Pages can be accessed at http://db.nben.ca/.

The New Brunswick Environmental Network (NBEN), established in 1991, is a communication network that links together non-profit environmental organizations. Its mission is to encourage and facilitate networking and communication among member groups in order to advance their work to protect the Earth and to promote ecologically sound ways of life, and to strengthen the environmental movement in New Brunswick.

— 30 —

Contact:
Raissa Marks, New Brunswick Environmental Network, office: 506-855-4144, cell: 506-588-2980
The workshop report from  "Running with the current: A workshop for watershed groups in NB" that was held on January 21, 2015 in Fredericton is now available to all members and associates of the NBEN in the Reference Library of our website (under the "Resources" tab).


The event attracted representatives from 24 watershed groups and seven other environmental groups. This represents 75% of all watershed groups in the province! They identified four priority areas on which they want to together: 

·         Communication strategy

·         Long-term funding strategy

·         Coordination of data collection and monitoring

·         Encouraging the completion of the water policy framework in New Brunswick (including the Water Classification Regulation)


A big thanks to all the participants who attended and to Small Change Fund for making the event possible. There is interesting work ahead!

Happy reading.
Hi everyone,

The ETF project awards have been announced!

http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/env/pdf/ETFAwards.pdf

Fingers crossed for you!

The NBEN team

Blog Archives


This blog is for news and opinion pieces by staff.
The views expressed in these articles are the author’s personal opinion and not those of the NBEN or its member or associate groups.

Action Alerts

Resquest for letters of support: Proposed name restoration for the Wolastoq

Sunday, 30 April 2017
by Alma
 The Wolastoq Grand Council supports our YOUTH GROUPS on their proposal for changing the name of the Saint John River, back to it’s original and proper name; Wolastoq (the beautiful & bountiful river ). We see this as a good place to begin the process of implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; which was strongly recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.  

Proposed Name Restoration: 
  • The name Saint John River back to it’s original indigenous name -  Wolastoq
Purpose: 
  • Wolastoq; (the beautiful river) is the original Indigenous name of the River.
  • Wolastoq is the name sake for the real identity and unique nationality of our People; the Wolastoqiyik.  Respecting the rights of Wolastoqiyik.
  • Scientific studies have now confirmed, what our people have always known; “that water has memory”.    This river will remember its original name.   
  • This deed would begin a process for reconciliation with a show of goodwill on the part of the Government of New Brunswick, and would;
  • Create opportunities for discussions and engagement around indigenous issues.
  • Wolastoqiyik have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons. 

The Wolastoq Grand Council is requesting support letters from our Allies; as individuals, organizations, and/or Groups.  For more information, contact Alma Brooks, 506-478-1256, almabrooks.26@outlook.com

Please send support letters to the following addresses:

The Wolastoq Grand Council,
Grand Chief; Ron Tremblay
50 Maliseet Drive
Fredericton, NB, E3A 2V9


David Coon
Office of the Green Party Leader
P.O. Box 6000
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1

Additional Information

  1. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
Carolyn Bennett; Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; has assured the Wolastoq Grand Council in writing that; - “Canada is committed to a renewed nation to nation relationship with indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership.”   Carolyn Bennett also stated that ; - “Achieving full reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Canada is at the heart of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s mandate, and that the government of “Canada will engage with Indigenous peoples, provinces, territories, and Canadians on how to implement the Declaration in accordance with Canada’s Constitution”.

  1. Andrea Bear-Nicholas
As described in a 2011 article by Andrea Bear-Nicholas, Maliseet historian:  
  1. The first step in the dispossession for the indigenous peoples in the Maritimes began in earnest immediately after the British capture of the French fort at Louisbourg in 1758.   Where place names and names of First Nations in the entire region had been inscribed on earlier maps; both would soon be erased by colonial cartographers in a process described by J. B. Harley as cartographic colonialism.  The justifications for these erasures was found in the doctrine of discovery.   
  2. The second step in the dispossession of indigenous peoples in Nova Scotia began immediately after signing of the Treaty of 1760 by Passamaquoddy and Maliseet Leaders, and later the signing of the Mascarene Treaty.   Although there was no surrender of any lands in either of these Treaties; 1.5 million acres of Maliseet land which outlawed the surveying and expropriation of lands not yet ceded by the indigenous inhabitants or purchased by the Crown.    


  3. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:   Articles 1, 2, 6, & 13   support and provide a guide for the implementation leading to reconciliation.

As a distinct ‘people,’ we have a right to our accurate identity and nationality.
  • Indigenous Peoples have the right to the full enjoyment as a collective or as individuals of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and international human rights law. 
  • Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin and identity. 
  • Every indigenous individual has the right to their own nationality. 
  • Indigenous people have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons.  “States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected”.

ACTION ALERT: Reinstate funding to the Canadian Environmental Network

Friday, 03 February 2017
by Raissa Marks
The Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks need your help!

Historically, the Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks including the NBEN received annual core funding from the Government of Canada. This was used to facilitate networking on environmental issues across the country, coordinate national and provincial issue-based caucuses, coordinate ENGO participation in federal public consultation processes, and maintain open lines of communication between ENGOs and the federal government.

In 2011, as part of the across-the-board cuts to civil society organizations by the previous federal government, all federal funding to the RCEN and its provincial affiliate networks was cut. This left the national network and most of the affiliates with functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work.

There is hope that the current government will provide for renewed funding in its upcoming budget. This funding is crucial for the survival of the national network and many of the provincial affiliate networks. A proposal has been submitted. It now needs strong and immediate support from environmental groups and individuals across the country.

This is where you come in!

Please take a few minutes to write to Prime Minister Trudeau and your MP telling them why you value the RCEN, your provincial affiliate network, or environmental networking at the national level in general. Feel free to use the template letter provided below. You can personalize it based on your experience or simply copy and paste.

Trudeau’s email is justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca and you can find your MP’s email here: http://www.parl.gc.ca/Parliamentarians/en/members

Let’s show our federal politicians that a strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada!

Draft Template Letter:

Dear Prime Minister Trudeau,

I am writing to ask that annual core funding to the Canadian Environmental Network (RCEN) be reinstated.

Historically, the RCEN provided a crucial link between environmental groups across the country, both large and small. This link was vital in helping communities address environmental issues right across the country and ensuring a robust approach to the development of environmental policy in Canada.

Since funding was cut in 2011, the RCEN and most of its provincial affiliate networks have been functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work. This is not acceptable. A strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada. I urge you to reinstate core funding for this crucial work immediately.

Sincerely,
Blogue