The NBEN organized a meeting yesterday with 15 environmental groups and the Minister of Environment and Local Government and his senior staff. It was a great meeting during which we explored ways to work more closely together on water, climate change, regional planning, and other issues. Thank you to everyone who attended!

mtg Minister Kenny 2016 Mar 2
Photo: Ann Pohl
newbanner
Monday, February 22, 2016, 9:00 - 4:30
Fredericton Inn

·           What can we learn from other Canadian jurisdictions?
·           What resonates with the public in NB? With decision-makers?
·           What works well? And what doesn’t work at all?
·           How do you balance conservation with recreational and educational opportunities?

Highlights
-          Protected Areas: Lessons from Across Canada – Hear from Nova Scotia, Quebec, Alberta and others!
-          Increasing public support in NB – a panel of home-grown experts share their experience and know-how.
-          Establishing Coastal and Marine Protected Areas in NB - What are the challenges and how can support be built?
-          Building a case for protected areas in NB – throughout the day, work with others to identify what will resonate in NB and build the case!

Join us! For more information and to register, click here!

Hosted by the NB Biodiversity Collaborative. Brought to you by the Planning Committee:
-          Al Hanson, Canadian Wildlife Service
-          Barb Brown
-          David MacKinnon, Nova Scotia Environment
-          Eric Tremblay, Kouchibouguac National Park
-          Paula Noel, Nature Conservancy of Canada
-          Peter McLaughlin, NB Department of Environment and Local Government
-          Renata Woodward, Nature Trust of NB
-          Roberta Clowater, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, NB Chapter
-          Steve Gordon, NB Department of Natural Resources

With thanks to the NB Wildlife Trust Fund, Department of Natural Resources and the Canadian Wildlife Service.

Over the past six weeks or so, the NBEN has brought together groups from across the province to develop a joint submission to the Education Plan Secretariat that focuses on integrating sustainability education into our K-12 education system.  We are super excited about the resulting document, which provides a great framework for transforming our education system for a sustainable future.

This idea was born out of the most recent Sustainability Education Alliance conference, which was held at the end of October.

Click here to read the submission.

Live Wild Eng Bilingual

The Communications Team of the Biodiversity Collaborative has been working hard to develop a logo – and the final product is gorgeous. The logo was developed to help create awareness of the importance of New Brunswick’s biodiversity and to build public interest in preserving it. This logo can be used by all collaborative partner organizations to demonstrate solidarity and connect various efforts to advance biodiversity conservation, stewardship, and education. The logo is intended to supplement organizations’ brands by demonstrating a collaborative spirit.

Everyone is invited to use this logo!

  • Put it on your website and highlight your biodiversity work
  • Raise awareness through your social media and enhance your brand
  • Use it in your education materials and celebrate nature
Kudos to everyone who was involved in developing this logo!

Check out all the versions – and then get on board to build a brand for NB biodiversity!

This year marks the 10th anniversary for the NB Children’s Environmental Health Collaborative!  And to feature this event, we are hosting a workshop "Children's Health, Equity and the Environment: Creating Action" which looks at the issue through a new lens that brings together health, equity and the environment.  The workshop is themed around the questions:

What are the links between social inequity, the environment and children’s health?
What actions can happen, now on the ground, to immediately improve health outcomes for NB children?

Highlights

·         Experiential learning – a child-led tour of where North End Saint John children live and play
·         Children’s Health, Social Equity and Environment Fair

Speakers

·         Children's Health and the Environment - The Problem and the Solution, Philip Landrigan, Professor of Preventive Medicine and Pediatrics and Dean for Global Health, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY
·         Serious about equity? Thinking and working differently, Jeffrey Masuda, Director,  The Centre for Environmental Health Equity, and
Associate Professor, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies and Department of Geography, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario
·         Making our towns and cities healthier, Anne Roué Le Gall, Professor, Ecole des hautes études en santé publique, Rennes, France
·         NB Snap Shot: Associations and Trending, Michelina Mancuso, Executive Director of Performance Measurement, NB Health Council

Round Table

How is equity linked to children's health, socially, economically and environmentally?
What can be done?

Moderator: Bernard Richard

Round Table Contributors:
·         Jennifer Carhart, Principal, Princess Elizabeth School
·         Randy Hatfield, Executive Director, Human Development Council
·         Rob Moir, Professor of Economics and the Chair of the Department of Social Sciences, UNBSJ
·         Silvia Borsic, Executive Director, Saint John Family Resource Centre

Join us as we envision a different future for children’s health in New Brunswick. We will dream, and then we will get down to brass tacks and work together to determine real actions.

For more information and to register: http://www.nben.ca/index.php/en/cycling-article-event-01-nb-children-s-environmental-health-workshop

Brought to you by the organizing committee:

Barb McKinnon, NB Lung Association
Brigitte Lapointe, Health Canada
Céline Surette, Université de Moncton
Karen White-Masry, Scott Giffin and Todd Arsenault, NB Department of Health
Mary Ann Coleman, NB Environmental Network
Mary Britten-Belding, VON- Healthy Baby and Me
Mélanie LeBlanc, NB Department of Environment
Sharon Murphy, PEACE-NB
According to a recent survey, cross-sectoral collaboration is increasingly regarded as the key driver of progress towards sustainability, more so than public-private partnerships, leadership and innovation forums, and other approaches. Here in New Brunswick, the NBEN brings together partners from a wide variety of sectors to address the complex sustainability issues we face. The sum is greater than the parts – by working together, more can be achieved than by each organization working in its own silo.

Another interesting finding from the survey is that experts believe that multinational companies will be the key drivers of broad-scale collaborations to advance sustainability. I wonder if this will be the case in New Brunswick?

The survey also compared and contrasted corporations and NGOs and the drivers that propel each to become involved in sustainable development.

Two groups in the US, Sustain Ability and Globe Scan surveyed sustainability experts from around the world. The resulting report came out in February.

Last month, the Canadian Energy Strategy Working Group, of which NB Premier Brian Gallant is one of the co-chairs, announced the Canadian Energy Strategy. The intent of this strategy is to provide a framework for provinces and territories to work together on common energy-related interests.

While the strategy speaks to climate change quite a bit, it does so in a rather non-committal manner. For example, energy efficiency and conservation is an area of focus in the strategy, but so is “Develop and enhance a modern, reliable, environmentally safe and efficient series of transmission and transportation networks for domestic and export/import sources of energy”. Sounds like pipelines to me. The strategy also discusses transitioning to a lower-carbon economy (not a low-carbon economy). 

What does all this really mean? To me, the strategy is so broad that it could mean anything to anyone. But, don’t take it from me. Check it out for yourself here.

The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment has recently published an Implementation Framework for Climate Change Adaptation Planning at a Watershed Scale.The Framework lists seven steps through which a group of individuals can come together to assess and manage vulnerabilities and risks stemming from climate change at a watershed level. 

It is expected that the impacts of climate change on Canada’s water resources will be significant. Whether you are involved directly or indirectely with climate change adaptation and/or watersheds, or are just concerned about our water resources' well being, it's definitely worth checking out! 

Click here to consult the framework. Also available in the Climate Change Adaptation section of our Reference Library (under the "Resources" tab).

 
Are you interested in knowing more about the various projects linked to climate change adaptation around the province this year? Look no further! 

On June 24th, the NBEN held a workshop for ENGOs around climate change adaptation. A total of 12 ENGOs as well as a few other organizations were represented. Over the course of the day, the participants were able to map out adaptation in the province, network with other climate change adaptation enthusiast to exchange tools and resources, and to make the links in between the various projects to be implemented over the next year.

Following the workshop, the data was compiled and transformed into interactive maps. They are now available on our website! Click here to consult them.  

The report from the workshop is also available here.  

Enjoy! 
Do you buy local? Wish there were more options for local food and beverages?

The provincial government is developing a local food and beverage strategy and they are looking for input from New Brunswickers about their local food buying habits. The survey includes questions about the importance of supporting local producers, where local food is purchased and what can be done to improve accessibility of local food and beverages for consumers.

Check out the survey here and background information about the government’s buy local initiative can be found here.

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This blog is for news and opinion pieces by staff.
The views expressed in these articles are the author’s personal opinion and not those of the NBEN or its member or associate groups.

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Action Alerts

Conserve Our NB

Friday, 09 February 2018
by Nature Trust of New Brunswick

For countless generations, people in New Brunswick have cherished the wildlife and beauty of their natural surroundings. We have adopted many deeply rooted outdoor traditions that take us to the rivers, lakes, wetlands, forests, and coastlines of our beautiful province in all seasons of the year. Help protect the wild places that you love so that your family, children, and grandchildren will be able to enjoy them forever.

Over 95% of New Brunswick is currently unprotected and open to exploitation that could harm wildlife and damage the natural beauty of our province, and we need to act now to change that.

Through the Convention on Biological Diversity, Canada has signed on to conserve 17% of land and freshwater by 2020.  As Canadians, it is our shared responsibility to hold the government accountable to achieving this target. The Nature Trust of New Brunswick is urging you to speak out to your provincial representatives to declare your support for increased land conservation in the province, and encourage them to set set their own conservation goals for the province and develop an action plan to achieve these goalsThrough Pathway to Canada Target 1, an Indigenous Circle of Experts (ICE) has been identified to ensure all elements of the initiative are guided by Indigenous experts across Canada, which should be reflected in New Brunswick’s efforts as well.

A vast majority of Canadians agree that protecting the environment is one of the most important issues currently facing our country. In a recent national conservation survey, 87% of Canadians support increasing the amount of natural areas protected from development, including at national parks. Join the growing movement of people who are speaking out in support of land conservation.

We’ve made it easy for you to take action! It takes less than a minute with our online template to send a letter to your local MLA. To learn more about what you can do to support land conservation, download the Conserve Our NB toolkit.  

Printable pledge link: http://www.naturetrust.nb.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Conserve-Our-NB-Pledge.pdf  Please help by joining the movement and collecting signatures from your corner of the province to show support for increased land and freshwater protection in NB. 

Please return pledge sheets with original signatures to the Nature Trust of New Brunswick office.
Next Deadline: March 13, 2018

By mail:
P.O. Box 603 Station A,
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A6 

In person: 404 Queen St. 3rd floor,
Fredericton, NB

Have your say on Draft Water Strategy!

Wednesday, 15 November 2017
by Conservation Council of New Brunswick
A Water Strategy for New Brunswick

On October 6, 2017, the department of Environment and Local Government released a draft water strategy for comments. The draft strategy is available on the government website. Comments can be submitted by email to: waterstrategy-strategiedeleau@gnb.ca or by mail to: Department of Environment and Local Government, Policy and Planning Division, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, N.B., E3B 5H1. Comments will be accepted until November 20, 2017.

In order to help groups with their submissions, the Conservation Council of New Brunswick, in cooperation with watershed groups, has put together key elements of a watershed strategy and a sample letter to send to the Department.

Summary​ ​of​ ​8​ ​Key​ ​Elements​ ​of​ ​a​ ​Strong​ ​Water​ ​Protection​ ​Strategy

New​ ​Brunswick​ ​deserves​ ​a​ ​water​ ​protection​ ​strategy​ ​that:
    1. is​​ ​​science-based;​ ​(involving​ ​baseline​ ​data,​ ​tracking​ ​and​ ​taking​ ​into​ ​consideration cumulative​ ​impacts,​ ​environmental​ ​flows)
    2. sets​ ​water​ ​quality​ ​standards​ ​within​ ​a​ ​working,​ ​legal​ ​mechanism;
    3. conserves​ ​all​ ​water​ ​within​ ​​watersheds​ ​including​ ​surface​ ​waters​ ​(lakes,​ ​streams,​ ​rivers) and​ ​groundwater,​ ​by​ ​developing​ ​good​ ​conservation​ ​plans,​ ​policies​ ​and​ ​practices,​ ​and uses​ ​the​ ​precautionary​ ​principle​ ​as​ ​a​ ​guiding,​ ​legally​ ​enforceable​ ​tool;
    4. protects​ ​our​ ​marine​ ​coastal​ ​areas​ ​in​ ​law;
    5. has​ ​a​ ​meaningful​ ​form​ ​of​ ​​co-governance​ ​with​ ​First​ ​Nations;
    6. includes​ ​the​ ​development,​ ​implementation​ ​and​ ​enforcement​ ​of​ ​watershed​ ​protection plans,​ ​developed​ ​in​ ​a​ ​transparent​ ​manner,​ ​involving​ ​government,​ ​businesses,​ ​watershed organizations,​ ​farmers,​ ​municipal​ ​officials,​ ​and​ ​citizens;
    7. is​ ​accountable,​ ​which​ ​includes​ ​ongoing​ ​monitoring​ ​and​ ​annual​ ​reporting​ ​to​ ​the​ ​public​ ​on the​ ​progress​ ​of​ ​goals​ ​and​ ​objectives​ ​outlined​ ​in​ ​the​ ​water​ ​protection​ ​strategy;​ ​and,
    8. is​​ ​enforceable​ ​through​ ​a​ ​modern​ ​legal​ ​framework
Sample Letter
 My name is ______, and I am writing to express my support for a strong Water Strategy in New Brunswick.

I live near ______ OR I live in ___________ watershed

Describe your favourite spot to fish/swim/paddle etc.

Share your favourite water memory.

Clean, healthy water is important to me because _____________.

Have you recently experienced a boil water order? Blue-green algae? Extreme weather? Describe what is of concern to you.

I applaud the provincial government for moving forward on its commitment to protecting our water; however I believe the draft strategy does not go far enough to ensure healthy water for my watershed.

We need a water protection strategy that (Insert one or multiple key elements).

I am afraid that if left unattended, my watershed will face ongoing and increasing treats from (pollution, wetland and coastal estuary loss, loss of adequate environmental flow to sustain aquatic life, and increasing climate change impacts such as floods, droughts, and high temperatures.)

Please protect my watershed by implementing a strong water protection strategy with modern legislation that (note key element(s)) to ensure the health of our water and people.

Thank you,
Your name.

For more information, visit the CCNB's website.
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