Ken Maybee passed away on October 17, 2012. As CEO of the New Brunswick Lung Association, Ken was a dedicated leader and an advocate for the building of strong links between environmental and health issues. Ken was named to the Order of Canada in July 2012 for his efforts to improve air quality and the health of Canadians. In New Brunswick, Ken was involved in the development of the NB Clean Air Act and the Smoke-free Places Act. He helped to develop air quality standards, including the air quality health index used in many cities. Our condolences to Ken’s wife, his family and friends and to all the staff at the NB Lung Association who have lost a champion.

From the New Brunswick Lung Association
No words can express how devastated and sorry the New Brunswick Lung Association family is at the recent passing of Kenneth Maybee, our past President and CEO. Across the country the Lung Association staff and all those who knew Ken through his clean air advocacy work are mourning this loss.

Our thoughts, prayers, and deepest condolences go out to Ken's wife and family.

Ken left an amazing legacy both in terms of his professional work and in terms of the many lives he touched in such positive ways.
From the Conservation Council of New Brunswick
Conservation Council of New Brunswick is saddened by the passing of our respected and dedicated colleague Ken Maybee of the New Brunswick Lung Association

Ken put the NB Lung Association on the national map, with leading, high profile campaigns on clean air, anti-smoking and other environmental issues. As President and CEO of the NB Lung Association, Ken was a leader, innovator and tireless advocate for the Lung Association and the causes he championed. This is typical of the man he was.

Ken was named to the Order of Canada in July 2012. He was due to receive this prestigious award, as well as Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee Medal, on 23 November from the Governor General at Government House in Ottawa. Ken was named to the Order of Canada in the category of Social Services, for his efforts to improve air quality and the health of Canadians. His efforts have been described as follows "Mr. Maybee’s personal crusade to make human health the driving force for air quality policies and legislation has been extraordinary". He helped develop air quality standards, including the air quality health index used in many cities. He was instrumental in the introduction of the NB Clean Air Act and the Smoke-free Places Act, which, among other things, bans smoking in vehicles containing children under the age of 16. Locally, he helped the City of Fredericton organize the Canada Day parade and made the parade green by not allowing motorized vehicles to take part.
 

Obituary

MAYBEE, KENNETH H. - (1937 – 2012) - On Wednesday, 17 October, Ken Maybee passed away in tragic circumstances. Ken’s family is totally devastated at his sudden passing. Born Kenneth Hendrie Maybee in Montreal on 15 June 1937, he is survived by his wife Joan (Ingram) of 50 years and his two children, son Larry (Megan) living in Australia and daughter Kim (Gord) living in Nanaimo, BC. and four dearly loved grandchildren; Ryan, Nicole and Erin Maybee (Australia) and Molly O’Brien (Nanaimo). He also leaves behind his beloved cat, Mikey “they were buddies”. Ken was the youngest of seven children – four boys and two girls – Donald, Theresa, George, Floyd, William and Edna. He is survived by brothers Floyd (Joan) of Alberta, William (Gladys) of California and Edna (John) Tyler of Victoria, BC. He was predeceased by his parents Harry Jacob and Lillian, brothers Donald, George and sister Theresa. He is survived by his many nieces and nephews. Ken lived a 39 year career in the Canadian forces. He joined the Armoured Corps as a boy soldier in 1954. He quickly rose through the ranks, excelling at every course he attempted and appointment he was given. He served with distinction with the Royal Canadian Dragoons (RCD) in Petawawa, Germany and CFB Gagetown and with the 12e Regiment Blinde du Canada (12e RBC) in Valcartier, Quebec. During his military career, Ken served three different tours with NATO in Germany, four in Egypt and one in Cyprus. His notable appointments included Sergeant-Major of several Squadrons, in 12e RBC and at the Armoured School at the Combat Training Centre, CFB Gagetown. He was Regimental Sergeant-Major of 12e RBC, Chief Warrant Officer at Army Headquarters in St. Hubert, Quebec, and Command Chief Warrant Officer of Canadian Forces in Europe and the Middle East. In the latter stages of his career, Ken took his commission to move back to NB and as a Captain was appointed Detachment Commander of all Cadets in NB and PEI. Ken received many awards for his accomplishments in the military. In 1977 he was appointed to the Order of Military Merit, the second highest order administered by the Governor-in-Council, at the grade of Member (MMM), for distinctive merit and exceptional service. He was later upgraded to the level of Officer of the Order of Military Merit (OMM), a rare occurrence. Both awards were presented by the Governor General at Rideau Hall. Ken Maybee retired from the Canadian Forces in 1993 and took up the position of Executive Director (later President and CEO) of the NB Lung Association, one week after his retirement from the Canadian Forces. In typical fashion, Ken took the Lung Association to new heights, re-defining its focus and direction. He put the NB Lung Association on the national map, with leading, high profile campaigns on clean air, anti-smoking and other environmental issues. As President and CEO of the NB Lung Association, Ken was a leader, innovator and tireless advocate for the Lung Association and the causes he championed. This is typical of the man he was.


Ken was named to the Order of Canada in July 2012. He was due to receive this prestigious award, as well as Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II’s Diamond Jubilee Medal, on 23 November from the Governor General at Government House in Ottawa. Ken was named to the Order of Canada in the category of Social Services, for his efforts to improve air quality and the health of Canadians. His efforts have been described as follows “Mr. Maybee’s personal crusade to make human health the driving force for air quality policies and legislation has been extraordinary”. He helped develop air quality standards, including the air quality health index used in many cities. He was instrumental in the introduction of the NB Clean Air Act and the Smoke-free Places Act, which, among other things, bans smoking in vehicles containing children under the age of 16. Locally, he helped the City of Fredericton organize the Canada Day parade and made the parade green by not allowing motorized vehicles to take part. Ken was an avid sportsman. In his younger years he enjoyed playing basketball, volleyball, tennis and curling at a competitive level, and he was a long-standing regular at the Fredericton YMCA. More recently, he enjoyed playing “Texas hold’em” poker with the boys twice a week. Ken was a long-time resident of New Maryland, a proud Frederictonian and a pillar of the local community. He was a fine New Brunswicker and an outstanding Canadian. He was charity-minded and always active in community organizations. In his earlier years, he was active in the Lions Club in Oromocto. Throughout his life he was very active in the Masonic Order, the Shriners and was a member of Royal Canadian Legion. Ken was a friend and mentor to many; he constantly looked to help those less-advantaged members of the community. He will be dearly missed by his family, friends and the many people who admired and respected him.


Ken was cremated at McAdams Funeral Home. A memorial service to honour Ken’s memory will be announced at a later date. Donations in Ken’s memory may be made to a mental health charity, if so desired. On-line condolences may be made at www.mcadamsfh.com ADSUM 21 October 2012

http://www.inmemoriam.ca/view-announcement-327353-kenneth-maybee.html

Blog Archives


This blog is for news and opinion pieces by staff.
The views expressed in these articles are the author’s personal opinion and not those of the NBEN or its member or associate groups.

Action Alerts

Resquest for letters of support: Proposed name restoration for the Wolastoq

Sunday, 30 April 2017
by Alma
 The Wolastoq Grand Council supports our YOUTH GROUPS on their proposal for changing the name of the Saint John River, back to it’s original and proper name; Wolastoq (the beautiful & bountiful river ). We see this as a good place to begin the process of implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; which was strongly recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.  

Proposed Name Restoration: 
  • The name Saint John River back to it’s original indigenous name -  Wolastoq
Purpose: 
  • Wolastoq; (the beautiful river) is the original Indigenous name of the River.
  • Wolastoq is the name sake for the real identity and unique nationality of our People; the Wolastoqiyik.  Respecting the rights of Wolastoqiyik.
  • Scientific studies have now confirmed, what our people have always known; “that water has memory”.    This river will remember its original name.   
  • This deed would begin a process for reconciliation with a show of goodwill on the part of the Government of New Brunswick, and would;
  • Create opportunities for discussions and engagement around indigenous issues.
  • Wolastoqiyik have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons. 

The Wolastoq Grand Council is requesting support letters from our Allies; as individuals, organizations, and/or Groups.  For more information, contact Alma Brooks, 506-478-1256, almabrooks.26@outlook.com

Please send support letters to the following addresses:

The Wolastoq Grand Council,
Grand Chief; Ron Tremblay
50 Maliseet Drive
Fredericton, NB, E3A 2V9


David Coon
Office of the Green Party Leader
P.O. Box 6000
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1

Additional Information

  1. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
Carolyn Bennett; Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; has assured the Wolastoq Grand Council in writing that; - “Canada is committed to a renewed nation to nation relationship with indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership.”   Carolyn Bennett also stated that ; - “Achieving full reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Canada is at the heart of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s mandate, and that the government of “Canada will engage with Indigenous peoples, provinces, territories, and Canadians on how to implement the Declaration in accordance with Canada’s Constitution”.

  1. Andrea Bear-Nicholas
As described in a 2011 article by Andrea Bear-Nicholas, Maliseet historian:  
  1. The first step in the dispossession for the indigenous peoples in the Maritimes began in earnest immediately after the British capture of the French fort at Louisbourg in 1758.   Where place names and names of First Nations in the entire region had been inscribed on earlier maps; both would soon be erased by colonial cartographers in a process described by J. B. Harley as cartographic colonialism.  The justifications for these erasures was found in the doctrine of discovery.   
  2. The second step in the dispossession of indigenous peoples in Nova Scotia began immediately after signing of the Treaty of 1760 by Passamaquoddy and Maliseet Leaders, and later the signing of the Mascarene Treaty.   Although there was no surrender of any lands in either of these Treaties; 1.5 million acres of Maliseet land which outlawed the surveying and expropriation of lands not yet ceded by the indigenous inhabitants or purchased by the Crown.    


  3. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:   Articles 1, 2, 6, & 13   support and provide a guide for the implementation leading to reconciliation.

As a distinct ‘people,’ we have a right to our accurate identity and nationality.
  • Indigenous Peoples have the right to the full enjoyment as a collective or as individuals of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and international human rights law. 
  • Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin and identity. 
  • Every indigenous individual has the right to their own nationality. 
  • Indigenous people have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons.  “States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected”.

ACTION ALERT: Reinstate funding to the Canadian Environmental Network

Friday, 03 February 2017
by Raissa Marks
The Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks need your help!

Historically, the Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks including the NBEN received annual core funding from the Government of Canada. This was used to facilitate networking on environmental issues across the country, coordinate national and provincial issue-based caucuses, coordinate ENGO participation in federal public consultation processes, and maintain open lines of communication between ENGOs and the federal government.

In 2011, as part of the across-the-board cuts to civil society organizations by the previous federal government, all federal funding to the RCEN and its provincial affiliate networks was cut. This left the national network and most of the affiliates with functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work.

There is hope that the current government will provide for renewed funding in its upcoming budget. This funding is crucial for the survival of the national network and many of the provincial affiliate networks. A proposal has been submitted. It now needs strong and immediate support from environmental groups and individuals across the country.

This is where you come in!

Please take a few minutes to write to Prime Minister Trudeau and your MP telling them why you value the RCEN, your provincial affiliate network, or environmental networking at the national level in general. Feel free to use the template letter provided below. You can personalize it based on your experience or simply copy and paste.

Trudeau’s email is justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca and you can find your MP’s email here: http://www.parl.gc.ca/Parliamentarians/en/members

Let’s show our federal politicians that a strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada!

Draft Template Letter:

Dear Prime Minister Trudeau,

I am writing to ask that annual core funding to the Canadian Environmental Network (RCEN) be reinstated.

Historically, the RCEN provided a crucial link between environmental groups across the country, both large and small. This link was vital in helping communities address environmental issues right across the country and ensuring a robust approach to the development of environmental policy in Canada.

Since funding was cut in 2011, the RCEN and most of its provincial affiliate networks have been functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work. This is not acceptable. A strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada. I urge you to reinstate core funding for this crucial work immediately.

Sincerely,
Ken Maybee