Congratulations to this year’s Environmental Leadership Award winners!

I want to add a special shout out to Meagan Betts, who has taken an active role in the Youth Environmental Action Network, acting as the chair and representative for Fredericton High School Green Team and now EcoAction. I have seen Meagan in action and feel this is a much deserved honour.

Government text here

Winners of Environmental Leadership Awards

FREDERICTON (GNB) – A presentation was held today in Fredericton to honour the 2012 Environmental Leadership Award recipients and poster contest winners.

“Through this initiative, we are able to recognize these achievements as we highlight the importance of protecting our environment,” said Environment and Local Government Minister Bruce Fitch. “Sharing these initiatives will encourage further environmental stewardship and will have a positive impact on our province. Others can be motivated to follow in the footsteps of those recognized today.”

This year's recipients are:

●    Individual Youth – Meagan Betts, Youth Environmental Leader;
●    Youth Group – The Sacred Garden Team, Devon Middle School;
●    Individual – Pamela Fowler, Municipal Nature Park;
●    Business – Rhoda Welshman, ReAction Events;
●    Communities, Groups and Organizations – Tobique River Team, Tobique First Nation Community Clean-Up; and
●    Lifetime Achievement – Ralph Simpson, Youth Mentorship.

Fitch also announced the winners of the poster contest who illustrated an environmental theme. The winners are:

●    Sophie Landry, Save the World; and
●    Natasha Barna, Je suis ta Terre.

The awards are presented annually to individuals, communities, groups and businesses that demonstrate exceptional leadership in the enhancement and protection of the environment. A panel of independent judges selected the recipients.

Information about the awards is available online.

2012 Environmental Leadership Award recipients

Individual Youth


Meagan Betts – Fredericton

Youth Environmental Leader: A former student of Fredericton High School, Betts dedicated much of her time to enhancing environmental awareness at her school and in her community. She led the school Environmental Club and introduced such ideas as Motorless Mondays, vermiculture composting and a reduced car prom. Outside of school, Meagan chaired the Youth Environmental Action Network.

Youth Group

Devon Middle School – Fredericton

The Sacred Garden Team: In 2011, the Sacred Garden Project was established at Devon Middle School. While promoting a sustainable organic garden, this Outdoor Classroom aims to educate the students and the community about the importance of traditional First Nations' medicines. As students move through the process of germinating the seeds, maintaining and tracking their growth, and transplanting their seeds into the Garden Classroom, they also discover, through traditional teachings, a connection to the Earth, agriculture, history and sustainability.

Individual


Pamela Fowler – Riverview

Municipal Nature Park: An environmental science teacher at Riverview High School, Fowler is committed to teaching her students about the environment while using applied approaches to help them identify with the high school curriculum. She initiated the Mill Creek Project, which had her class propose a nature park in Riverview that would connect to the Fundy Biosphere Reserve. Her students surveyed the proposed park, completed water testing and botanical surveys, and presented their findings to the town council.

Business


Rhoda Welshman – Saint John

ReAction Events: Concerned for the environment and seeing a niche that needed to be filled, Welsman launched a business, ReAction Events. Focusing on environmentally-friendly parties and events, she aims to reduce the use of plastic products while providing unique, personalized party supplies for her clients. Welshman offers eco-friendly products that are handcrafted and sustainable. Not only are the decorations, table ware, and treat bags environmentally friendly but her parties promote both creative and physical activity.  

Community, Group and Organization

Tobique Riverbank Team – Tobique First Nation

Community Clean-up: The Riverbank Team of Tobique First Nation was formed after a need for riverbank stabilization work was identified. Following this project, the team started to look at the community as a whole, and when an opportunity to work with the Valley Solid Waste Commission arose, they led the way. Working together, the team and the commission cleaned up illegal dumpsites in the community, posted signs discouraging dumping and cleaned streams and banks along the river. This spurred the community to promote a clean environment and to hold community clean-up days as well as the clean-up of the demolition site of an old school.

Lifetime Achievement


Ralph Simpson – Fredericton

Youth Mentorship: An ecologist and forest pathologist, Ralph Simpson is committed to environmental restoration and youth mentorship. For more than 20 years he has volunteered to develop, obtain funding, lead and execute environmental projects. He has been involved with The Fredericton Backyard Composters, the Fredericton Area Watersheds Association, TD Friends of the Environment Foundation, and in 2006 he was the recipient of the Canadian Environment Awards Community Award. Simpson also worked on the Bur Oak Project, where he trained and worked with youth to restore at-risk native species of trees, and the Children's International Summer Villages, where he was an environmental mentor, leading annual trail and stream clean-ups.

http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/elg/news/news_release.2012.11.1040.html

Spotlight

Blog

Bringing communities and schools together, one tree planting at a time!

Monday, 25 September 2017
by Pascale Léa Ouellette
For immediate release
Date: September 18th, 2017

Dundas, NB - This past Friday, the New Brunswick Environmental Network in collaboration with École Notre-Dame and the Pays de Cocagne Sustainable Development Group launched the 2017 Branch Out, Make Waves challenge at École Notre-Dame.

“Branch Out, Make Waves” challenges youth and community groups to work together in their local community to help conserve New Brunswick landscapes and shorelines. Over 400 young New Brunswickers participated last year, together planting 1254 trees and cleaning 20 hectares of shoreline!

“This is a great opportunity for youth to contribute to conservation and to create partnerships with environmental groups in their community. I look forward to the 2017 challenge and what it will bring,” said Pascale Ouellette, Education and Outreach Programs Coordinator with the New Brunswick Environmental Network.

The launch on the 15th was also one of the 150 tree planting events across the country in 2017 to commemorate Canada’s 150th. This project is made possible in part by the Government of Canada, Tree Canada, the EcoAction Community Funding Program, UNI Coopération FInancière, and the many dedicated volunteers across the province.
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Contact Person:
Pascale Ouellette, Education and Outreach Programs Coordinator, NBEN
Tel: 506-855-4144
Email: nben@nben.ca

 
image1
Tree Canada representative, Fabrice Parisi, speaking on Tree Canada’s role in tree planting events through Canada.

 image2
Students of École Notre-Dame welcoming ceremony attendees.

Check it out: Every Living Thing – Experiencing a bioblitz

Wednesday, 05 April 2017
by Raissa Marks
Header 1 blue owl

The documentary film, Every Living Thing -­ experiencing a bioblitz, will take you on an amazing journey of what it's like to spend four weeks over two summers exploring all aspects of nature – fish, insects, plants, fungi, reptiles, amphibians and mammals - that live in NB’s own Grand Lake Protected Natural Area.

Celebrate the UN Decade of Biodiversity – host a film screening in your community!

Unlike reality TV, this documentary film features real scientists speaking about real issues affecting real people living in real communities.

Every Living Thing was produced by NB-based company, Flower Power Production, in collaboration with the New Brunswick Museum's BiotaNB program.  BiotaNB is a 20-year biodiversity research project to identify and catalogue as many species in the province of New Brunswick, before human encroachment and climate change intensifies.  The NBEN is partnering with Flower Power Production to promote community film screenings of this film across Canada. 

Upcoming Events


Roundtable on Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation
Mon, Oct 23rd, 2017
Halifax

Government Pre-Budget Public Consultation
Mon, Oct 23rd, 2017
Moncton

Bea Johnson on Zero Waste Living
Tue, Oct 24th, 2017

Action Alerts

Call for nominations for the NBEN Awards - 2017

Monday, 31 July 2017
by Annika Chiasson
Every day people and environmental groups take action to protect and restore New Brunswick’s environment.  

Over this past year, who stands out in your mind? 

We invite you to nominate a group or individual deserving of one of the NBEN awards which will be presented in style at Eco-Confluence 2017.  Send an e-mail to nben@nben.ca describing your nominee’s work.  Nominees must be members or associates of the NBEN*.

Nomination deadline is September 13, 2017.

*Current NBEN Steering Committee members are not eligible for awards.

Resquest for letters of support: Proposed name restoration for the Wolastoq

Sunday, 30 April 2017
by Alma
 The Wolastoq Grand Council supports our YOUTH GROUPS on their proposal for changing the name of the Saint John River, back to it’s original and proper name; Wolastoq (the beautiful & bountiful river ). We see this as a good place to begin the process of implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; which was strongly recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.  

Proposed Name Restoration: 
  • The name Saint John River back to it’s original indigenous name -  Wolastoq
Purpose: 
  • Wolastoq; (the beautiful river) is the original Indigenous name of the River.
  • Wolastoq is the name sake for the real identity and unique nationality of our People; the Wolastoqiyik.  Respecting the rights of Wolastoqiyik.
  • Scientific studies have now confirmed, what our people have always known; “that water has memory”.    This river will remember its original name.   
  • This deed would begin a process for reconciliation with a show of goodwill on the part of the Government of New Brunswick, and would;
  • Create opportunities for discussions and engagement around indigenous issues.
  • Wolastoqiyik have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons. 

The Wolastoq Grand Council is requesting support letters from our Allies; as individuals, organizations, and/or Groups.  For more information, contact Alma Brooks, 506-478-1256, almabrooks.26@outlook.com

Please send support letters to the following addresses:

The Wolastoq Grand Council,
Grand Chief; Ron Tremblay
50 Maliseet Drive
Fredericton, NB, E3A 2V9


David Coon
Office of the Green Party Leader
P.O. Box 6000
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1

Additional Information

  1. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
Carolyn Bennett; Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; has assured the Wolastoq Grand Council in writing that; - “Canada is committed to a renewed nation to nation relationship with indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership.”   Carolyn Bennett also stated that ; - “Achieving full reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Canada is at the heart of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s mandate, and that the government of “Canada will engage with Indigenous peoples, provinces, territories, and Canadians on how to implement the Declaration in accordance with Canada’s Constitution”.

  1. Andrea Bear-Nicholas
As described in a 2011 article by Andrea Bear-Nicholas, Maliseet historian:  
  1. The first step in the dispossession for the indigenous peoples in the Maritimes began in earnest immediately after the British capture of the French fort at Louisbourg in 1758.   Where place names and names of First Nations in the entire region had been inscribed on earlier maps; both would soon be erased by colonial cartographers in a process described by J. B. Harley as cartographic colonialism.  The justifications for these erasures was found in the doctrine of discovery.   
  2. The second step in the dispossession of indigenous peoples in Nova Scotia began immediately after signing of the Treaty of 1760 by Passamaquoddy and Maliseet Leaders, and later the signing of the Mascarene Treaty.   Although there was no surrender of any lands in either of these Treaties; 1.5 million acres of Maliseet land which outlawed the surveying and expropriation of lands not yet ceded by the indigenous inhabitants or purchased by the Crown.    


  3. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:   Articles 1, 2, 6, & 13   support and provide a guide for the implementation leading to reconciliation.

As a distinct ‘people,’ we have a right to our accurate identity and nationality.
  • Indigenous Peoples have the right to the full enjoyment as a collective or as individuals of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and international human rights law. 
  • Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin and identity. 
  • Every indigenous individual has the right to their own nationality. 
  • Indigenous people have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons.  “States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected”.

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