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Check it out: Every Living Thing – Experiencing a bioblitz

Wednesday, 05 April 2017
by Raissa Marks
Header 1 blue owl

The documentary film, Every Living Thing -­ experiencing a bioblitz, will take you on an amazing journey of what it's like to spend four weeks over two summers exploring all aspects of nature – fish, insects, plants, fungi, reptiles, amphibians and mammals - that live in NB’s own Grand Lake Protected Natural Area.

Celebrate the UN Decade of Biodiversity – host a film screening in your community!

Unlike reality TV, this documentary film features real scientists speaking about real issues affecting real people living in real communities.

Every Living Thing was produced by NB-based company, Flower Power Production, in collaboration with the New Brunswick Museum's BiotaNB program.  BiotaNB is a 20-year biodiversity research project to identify and catalogue as many species in the province of New Brunswick, before human encroachment and climate change intensifies.  The NBEN is partnering with Flower Power Production to promote community film screenings of this film across Canada. 

Sooooo many opportunities to have your say

Tuesday, 22 November 2016
by Raissa Marks
There are so many government consultations going on that it’s hard to keep track! We’re making it a bit easier by compiling a list of those of interest to environmental groups and their deadlines:

Pre-budget Provincial
New Brunswickers are invited to attend upcoming public meetings focused on priorities for the 2017-18 budget. November 16-December 5

Electoral Reform Provincial
The Commission on Electoral Reform is looking at alternative voting systems, voting age, and other election rules. Deadline: November 30

Navigable Waters Federal
Review of the previous government’s changes to the Navigable Waters Protection Act. Deadline: December 7

Environmental Protection Act Federal
Comprehensive review of the provisions and operation of theCanadian Environmental Protection Act. Deadline: December 1

Charities Federal
Modernization of the rules governing charities and their political activities. Deadline: December 9

Environmental Assessment Federal
Comprehensive review of Canada’s environmental assessment processes. Deadline: December 18

Fisheries Federal
Review of the 2012-13 changes to the Fisheries Act made by the previous government. Comments welcome on restoring habitat protections that were lost and also on incorporating modern safeguards. No deadline mentioned but the committee responsible is submitting its report in “early 2017”.

National Energy Board Federal
A targeted review of the NEB’s structure, role and mandate under the National Energy Board Act. Deadline: January 17

Clean Air Act Operating Approval – Irving Provincial
Renewal of the Approval to Operate for the Irving Pulp and Paper Limited Reversing Falls Complex in Saint John. Deadline: March 7

Featured Group

soils center
Eastern Canada Soil and Water Conservation Centre

News From Groups

Corbett calls for caution and transparency in wake of fed’s Sisson Mine approval

Tuesday, 27 June 2017
by Jon MacNeill
The Conservation Council’s Executive Director, Lois Corbett, is calling for caution and transparency after the federal government gave its approval of the proposed open-pit Sisson Mine near Stanley.

Corbett told CBC Radio’s Information Morning Fredericton on Monday, June 26 that many details surrounding the project — such as the specific design of the tailings dam needed to protect the Nashwaak watershed and surrounding communities from toxic mine waste, or who would pay for the costs of replacing drinking water and repairing stream habitat in the event of a leak or breach like we saw at Mt. Polley, B.C. — have yet to be made public.

Northcliff Resources, the company behind the Sisson project, was given 40 conditions to meet during the provincial environmental assessment process last year. Corbett said there was talk at Friday’s announcement that the company had met all the conditions, but “I’ve yet to see any evidence of that. There’s not a spot on the website where you can go and download a detailed tailings dam design, for example.

“Perhaps the company has provided some material, so someone could check a box on a long list of conditions. I haven’t seen any evidence of that, and I would hope the government would let us all see soon, sooner as opposed to later,” she said.

Listen to the full interview with host Terry Seguin here.

For more coverage of CCNB on the Sisson Mine project, check out:

  • Corbett called for greater transparency from the provincial government in this CBC article published Friday, 23, saying “this project is a long way from being complete — a piece of paper from a federal minister saying approval is granted, with no details, doesn’t give me much confidence.”
  • The New Brunswick Telegraph-Journal reported on concerns raised by Corbett and Taymouth Environmental Action’s Jim Emberger about the risks to drinking water, river habitat, and nearby communities.
  • Corbett questioned the logic behind risking drinking water for a limited number of unsustainable jobs in this Canadian Press story, saying “I remain to be convinced that those jobs created over the life of the project are equal in weight to the risk to the water.” The story was shared by Global News, CTV, the Globe & Mail, The Financial Post, Metro News, Nanaimo News, the Red Deer Advocate,105.3 the Fox, 104.9 and K93.
  • Corbett commented on the environmental risks of the project in stories by L’Acadie Nouvelle and L’actualite.
For more information on the Conservation Council’s concerns about the Sisson Mine, see:

The Nature Trust of New Brunswick Conserves Island in Lower Wolastoq (Saint John River)

Wednesday, 21 June 2017
by Nature Trust of New Brunswick
(Maugerville, NB) The Nature Trust of New Brunswick has expanded the amount of conserved land in the Grand Lake Meadows region with the acquisition of 70 hectares (172 acres) on Middle Island in the Maugerville area of the lower St. John River. The new nature preserve will be named after the traditional Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik name for the island, Noloqonokek/Nələkwənəkek Nature Preserve. 

Long before the river was named the St. John River, it was known by Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik (Maliseet People) as ‘Wolastoq’/Wəlastəkw, meaning ‘Beautiful and Bountiful river’, a name that the nation is currently working to reclaim. ‘Noloqonokek/Nələkwənəkek’ is the traditional Wolastoqiyik/Wəlastəkwiyik name for what is now known as ‘Middle Island’. Nolomiw refers to upriver and ‘qono’ refers to a ‘long period of time’ therefore, ‘Noloqonokek/Nələkwənəkek’ is relating to upriver and a long period of time. The Maliseet language was an oral language and two linguistic spelling variations of the language have been developed and are both recognized today.

“Wolastoq ancestors wisely named each and every landscape and waterway according to a detailed description of each unique area.” Says Wolastoq Grand Chief, Ron Tremblay. “For instance, Wolastoq means “Beautiful and Bountiful River” for it once was Beautiful as well as provided everything our people needed to survive.”

For many generations, Middle Island has served the farming families of the Maugerville area as summer pasture ground. The Nature Trust acquired the new nature preserve to conserve in perpetuity the floodplain forest and Provincially Significant Wetlands that supports a diversity of plant life, birds, amphibians, and rare insects. The preserve is part of the Grand Lake Meadows, Atlantic Canada’s largest freshwater wetland complex.

“The Nature Trust is excited to work with landowners on protecting new pieces of the Grand Lake Meadows.” Says Nature Trust President, Vince Zelazny. “As the largest wetland in the Maritimes, the Grand Lake Meadows is a hotspot for a diversity of rare and endangered species. This acquisition is important to protecting the habitats that these species rely on for survival.”

On the afternoon of June 24th from 1 – 5 PM, the Nature Trust, along with Wolastoqiyik elders, and Canoe Kayak New Brunswick, will be hosting a grand opening event. Members of the public are invited to join a paddle in the big canoes, starting at Douglas Hazen Park, going past the Welamukotuk Cinerea Nature Preserve on Oromocto Island, with a stop at the shoreline of Noloqonokek. For more information and to join the grand opening event, please contact Bethany at bethany.young@ntnb.org or at (506) 457-2398.

A special thank you to those who contributed to the protection of Noloqonokek/ Nələkwənəkek Nature Preserve including major funders: The Government of Canada through the Natural Areas Conservation Program, the NB Wildlife Trust Fund, the Davis Conservation Foundation, The William P. Wharton Trust, the Sitka Foundation, and the ECHO Foundation.

About the Nature Trust of New Brunswick

Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a registered charitable conservation organization dedicated to preserving the province’s ecologically significant landscapes. To date, the Nature Trust has conserved over 2,800 hectares (7,000 acres) in 50 beautiful and diverse nature preserves in New Brunswick.

About the Natural Areas Conservation Program

The Government of Canada’s Natural Areas Conservation Program (NACP) is a unique public-private partnership managed and directed by the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC). To date, $345 million has been invested in the NACP by the Government of Canada to secure our natural heritage. Additionally, more than $500 million in matching contributions has been raised by NCC and its partners. 

Action Alerts

Resquest for letters of support: Proposed name restoration for the Wolastoq

Sunday, 30 April 2017
by Alma
 The Wolastoq Grand Council supports our YOUTH GROUPS on their proposal for changing the name of the Saint John River, back to it’s original and proper name; Wolastoq (the beautiful & bountiful river ). We see this as a good place to begin the process of implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples; which was strongly recommended by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.  

Proposed Name Restoration: 
  • The name Saint John River back to it’s original indigenous name -  Wolastoq
Purpose: 
  • Wolastoq; (the beautiful river) is the original Indigenous name of the River.
  • Wolastoq is the name sake for the real identity and unique nationality of our People; the Wolastoqiyik.  Respecting the rights of Wolastoqiyik.
  • Scientific studies have now confirmed, what our people have always known; “that water has memory”.    This river will remember its original name.   
  • This deed would begin a process for reconciliation with a show of goodwill on the part of the Government of New Brunswick, and would;
  • Create opportunities for discussions and engagement around indigenous issues.
  • Wolastoqiyik have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons. 

The Wolastoq Grand Council is requesting support letters from our Allies; as individuals, organizations, and/or Groups.  For more information, contact Alma Brooks, 506-478-1256, almabrooks.26@outlook.com

Please send support letters to the following addresses:

The Wolastoq Grand Council,
Grand Chief; Ron Tremblay
50 Maliseet Drive
Fredericton, NB, E3A 2V9


David Coon
Office of the Green Party Leader
P.O. Box 6000
Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1

Additional Information

  1. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada
Carolyn Bennett; Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada; has assured the Wolastoq Grand Council in writing that; - “Canada is committed to a renewed nation to nation relationship with indigenous peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership.”   Carolyn Bennett also stated that ; - “Achieving full reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Canada is at the heart of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s mandate, and that the government of “Canada will engage with Indigenous peoples, provinces, territories, and Canadians on how to implement the Declaration in accordance with Canada’s Constitution”.

  1. Andrea Bear-Nicholas
As described in a 2011 article by Andrea Bear-Nicholas, Maliseet historian:  
  1. The first step in the dispossession for the indigenous peoples in the Maritimes began in earnest immediately after the British capture of the French fort at Louisbourg in 1758.   Where place names and names of First Nations in the entire region had been inscribed on earlier maps; both would soon be erased by colonial cartographers in a process described by J. B. Harley as cartographic colonialism.  The justifications for these erasures was found in the doctrine of discovery.   
  2. The second step in the dispossession of indigenous peoples in Nova Scotia began immediately after signing of the Treaty of 1760 by Passamaquoddy and Maliseet Leaders, and later the signing of the Mascarene Treaty.   Although there was no surrender of any lands in either of these Treaties; 1.5 million acres of Maliseet land which outlawed the surveying and expropriation of lands not yet ceded by the indigenous inhabitants or purchased by the Crown.    


  3. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:   Articles 1, 2, 6, & 13   support and provide a guide for the implementation leading to reconciliation.

As a distinct ‘people,’ we have a right to our accurate identity and nationality.
  • Indigenous Peoples have the right to the full enjoyment as a collective or as individuals of all human rights and fundamental freedoms as recognized in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and international human rights law. 
  • Indigenous peoples and individuals are free and equal to all other peoples and individuals and have the right to be free from any kind of discrimination, in the exercise of their rights, in particular that based on their indigenous origin and identity. 
  • Every indigenous individual has the right to their own nationality. 
  • Indigenous people have a right to retain their own names for communities, places and persons.  “States shall take effective measures to ensure that this right is protected”.

ACTION ALERT: Reinstate funding to the Canadian Environmental Network

Friday, 03 February 2017
by Raissa Marks
The Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks need your help!

Historically, the Canadian Environmental Network and its provincial affiliate networks including the NBEN received annual core funding from the Government of Canada. This was used to facilitate networking on environmental issues across the country, coordinate national and provincial issue-based caucuses, coordinate ENGO participation in federal public consultation processes, and maintain open lines of communication between ENGOs and the federal government.

In 2011, as part of the across-the-board cuts to civil society organizations by the previous federal government, all federal funding to the RCEN and its provincial affiliate networks was cut. This left the national network and most of the affiliates with functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work.

There is hope that the current government will provide for renewed funding in its upcoming budget. This funding is crucial for the survival of the national network and many of the provincial affiliate networks. A proposal has been submitted. It now needs strong and immediate support from environmental groups and individuals across the country.

This is where you come in!

Please take a few minutes to write to Prime Minister Trudeau and your MP telling them why you value the RCEN, your provincial affiliate network, or environmental networking at the national level in general. Feel free to use the template letter provided below. You can personalize it based on your experience or simply copy and paste.

Trudeau’s email is justin.trudeau@parl.gc.ca and you can find your MP’s email here: http://www.parl.gc.ca/Parliamentarians/en/members

Let’s show our federal politicians that a strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada!

Draft Template Letter:

Dear Prime Minister Trudeau,

I am writing to ask that annual core funding to the Canadian Environmental Network (RCEN) be reinstated.

Historically, the RCEN provided a crucial link between environmental groups across the country, both large and small. This link was vital in helping communities address environmental issues right across the country and ensuring a robust approach to the development of environmental policy in Canada.

Since funding was cut in 2011, the RCEN and most of its provincial affiliate networks have been functioning primarily on a voluntary basis with limited capacity to do their work. This is not acceptable. A strong, well-connected grassroots environmental community is essential to a strong Canada. I urge you to reinstate core funding for this crucial work immediately.

Sincerely,

Green Jobs

EOS Eco-Energy Watershed Coordinator

Thursday, 08 June 2017
by EOS Eco-Energy
Watershed Coordinator

EOS is an award winning not-for-profit organization focused on helping local communities reduce and adapt to climate change in the Tantramar region. We are looking for a dynamic individual who will develop a water quality monitoring program and coordinate outreach and education for the Inner Bay of Fundy and part of the Cape Tormentine Peninsula watershed composites. The watershed coordinator will work out of our Sackville, NB office.

Duties:

  • Supervised by the executive director, you will be responsible for coordinating public education and outreach on watershed issues including flooding, creating a watershed committee of local people, developing a water quality monitoring program with project partners, and building capacity in monitoring techniques.
  • Collect, review and assess existing watershed data.
  • Communicate with the public and raise awareness about watershed, flooding, water quality and adaptation issues, etc. at community events in Tantramar, as well as with news articles, and social media posts, etc.
  • Explore the role of citizen science in watershed quality monitoring.
  • Prepare regular reports of project activities, write newsletter articles, prepare public relations materials, update databases and webpages, maintain volunteer lists, etc.
Experience required:

  • Knowledge of or experience with watershed & water quality issues and climate change adaptation. Knowledge of the Tantramar area and local climate issues would be an asset.
  • Knowledge of or experience with watershed monitoring, water-testing and associated data analysis, and GPS.
  • Experience coordinating community-based projects.
  • Committee and/or event coordination.
  • Experience working independently as well as part of a team.
  • Experience with community outreach, public education including children/youth.
  • Watershed habitat identification and species identification (birds, plants, etc.) would be an asset.
  • Marketing/advertising, social media, website maintenance (using Wordpress) would be an asset.
Qualifications

  • Post-secondary degree in biology or environmental sciences or related field.
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills. Fluency in English. Valid drivers licence and vehicle.
  • Dynamic, creative, organized, diligent, attention to detail, responsible, energetic, excellent time management skills, strong leadership and interpersonal skills, team player, able to take initiative.
Contract details:

9 month contract from July 2017 to March 2018. 35 hours a week. Possibility of extension, depending on funding.


Application procedure and deadline:  

Please forward your cover letter, resume and three references to eos@nb.aibn.com by 4pm Friday, June 16th, 2017. If you have questions, please contact Amanda Marlin at (506) 536-4487 or eos@nb.aibn.com.

The Conservation Council is now hiring summer students!

Thursday, 18 May 2017
by Corey Robichaud
Do you have a SEED voucher for the summer? Are you looking for a fun placement? The Conservation Council is now hiring summer students!

We’re looking for young people who are interested in engaging with the public, informing New Brunswickers about our work, blogging about events and workshops, helping out with the pollinator garden at Conserver House, organizing our seasonal BBQs, and more!

Interested applicants can apply by emailing a resume and cover letter to jon.macneill@conservationcouncil.ca.

Responsibilities include: Coordinating production and distribution of CCNB promotional materials (including informational leaflets, posters, videos, audio playlists and other innovative marketing resources) at public events and in the community; Supporting CCNB involvement with and presence at community events and summer festivals across N.B.; Developing social media marketing campaigns and content for our website; and conducting research on the history of CCNB and topics related to our program areas.

Find our job listing at www.nbjobs.ca by searching for “Conservation Council.”

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